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Full text of "Year book ... City of Charleston, So. Ca"

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L892 
L691927 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02301 0835 



YEAR BOOK-1892. 





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CITY OF CHARLESTON^.c 1 

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1691927 






WalkeFv, Evans & Cogswell Co., Printers, 
3 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. ^ 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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CITY GOVERNMENT. 



MAYOR AND ALDERMEN, 

Elected Dec'r Stk, 1891, Inaugubated Dec'r 14tii, 189L 



MAYOPx. 
Hon. JOHN F. FICKEN. 

MAYOR Pro Tem. 1892. 
Dr. H. BAEE. 



ALDERMEN- 
WARD I— G. W. WILLIAMS, Jr., A. B. MURRAY. 
Ward 2— A. A, KROEG, ZBIMERMAN DAVIS. 
Ward 3— K. S. CATHCART, O. FRISIUS. 
W^ARD 4-JOHNC. TIEDEMAN, J. H STEINMEYER. 
Ward 5-C. 8. G ALSDEN, P. BRODERICK. 
Ward 6— H. BAER. T. GRANGE] SIMONS, Jr. 
Ward 7— L D. MAHLSTEDT, T. G. MAIN. 
Ward 8~J0HX B. REEVES, -J. ELMORE MARTIN. 
Ward 0-JOHN L MURPHY, A. J. RIEEY. 
Ward 10— HENRY HAESLOOP, W. F. STRONG. 
Ward U-T. S. WILBUR. L. C. A. ROESSLER. 
Ward 12-L. E. WILLIAMS, H. L. CADE. 

♦Resigned January 26, 1S92; succeeded by 1. V. Bardiu, June 14, 1892, 



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1 



IV Oiiij Goi'enrnwid. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF CITY COUNCIL; 

APPOINTED DECEMBER 14TII, ] 891. 



Ways and Means— Dr. H. Baer, Chairman ; C. S. Gadsdon, George 
W. Williams, Jr., John B. Keeves, A. E. Mm ray, John 0. Tiedeman 
and the IMayor. 

Seweragc—Dr. T. Grange Simons, Jr., Chairnian ; Dr. H. Baer, H. 
L. Cade, A. B. Murray, A. A. Kroeg and the Mayor. 

Streets— Geo. W. Williams, Jr., Chairman ; *J. Elmore Martin, J. 
IT. Steinmeyer, Zimmerman Davis, J. D. Murphy, L. D. Mahistedt 
and the Mayor. 

AccOunts--T\ G. Main, r:hairman ; T. S. Wilbur and the Mayor. 

Lighting the City— G. S. Gadsden, Chairman; Dr. H. Raer, CJeo. 
W. Williams, Jr., T. S. AVilbur, L. E. Williams. 

Contracts— John B, Keeves, Chairman ; A. A. Kroeg and the 
Mayor, 

Engrossed Bills— T. S. Wilbur, Chairman ; C. Frisins, T. G. Main. 

Fire Escapes— A. J. Eiley, Ciiairman ; R. S. Cathcart, P. ]3roderick. 

Steam Engines— J. D. Murphy, Chairman ; L. E. Williams, A. J. 
Kiiey. 

Eetrenchment and Relief— E[. Haesloop, Chairman ; J. H. Stein- 
meyer, L C. A, Koessler. 

Eailroads- John C. Tiedeman, Chairman; R. S. Cathcart, T. G. 
Main. 

Tidal Drains— H. L. Cade, Chairman ; Dr. T. G. Simons, Jr., I. V. 
Bardin. 

Artesian V/ells and Lot — L. C. A. Roessler, Chairman ; A. J. Eiley, 
I. V. Bardin. 

V/ood and Brick Buildings— H. L. Cade, Chairman ; W. F. Strong, 
L. E. Williams. 

Journals and Vacant Offices— A. B. Murray, Chairman ; L. D. 
Mahistedt, J. H. Steinmeyer. 

Port and Harbor Improvements— Zimmerman Davis, Chairman ; 
H. Haesloop, P.Broderick. 

Water Supply— A. A. Kroeg, Chairman; C. S. Gadsden, John B, 
Reeves. 

City Lands — C. Frisius, Chairman; L. C. A. Roessler, Zimmer- 
man Davis. 

Printing— John H. Steinmeyer, Chairman ; A. A. Kroeg, H. 
Haesloop. 



*Kesignecl January 26, ib92; T. S. Wilbur uppoiuted. 



OiUj (roveo'nmcni. V 

fJity H".]!, C^o"]' and Chimes— L. D. Mohlsfedt, Cbairman; P. 
]irodcrick, L. C. A. Roessler. 

riea sure Grounds, Lower Wards — R. S. Catlicart, Chidrman ; A. 
B. Murray, A. A. Kroeg. 

Pleasure Grounds, Upper Wards— L. E. Williams, Chairman ; L. 
D. Mablstedt, W. F. Strong. 

Public Buildlugs— P. Broderick^ Chairman ; J. D. JM"rphy, C, 
Frisius. 

Fire Loan Bonds— W. F. Strong, Chairman; T. G. Main and the 
Mayor. 

CLERK OF COUNCIL. 

W. \V. SIMONS. 

MESSENGER OF COUNCIL. 

EOBT. G. O'NEALE. 

, CITY COURT, 

Recokder, WM. ALSTON PRINGLE. 

CoRPOKATiox Counsel, CHARLES INGLESBY. 

Sheriff, GLENN E. DAVIS. 

Clerk, EDW. ST. J. GRIMKE. 

BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 

Dr. H.B.ier, C. S Gadsden, A. B. Murray, J, C Tiedeman, J. B. 
Reeves, George \V. Vviliiams, Jr. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

Treasurer— W. L. Campbell, 

Assessor— W. Aiken Kelly. 

Superiiitendent of Streets— T. A. Huguenin. 

City Civil Engineer— L. J. Barbot. 

Tidal Drain Keeper— John E. Koster. 

Guagers of Liquor— G. W. Bell, 

Flour Inspector 

Inspectors and Surveyors of Timber— S. P. Bennet, C. S. Jenkins, 
P. Devereux. 

Chimney Contractors— Wards 1 and 2, John J. Kiley ; Wards 3 
and 4. Wm. Sheltou ; Wards 5 and 6, Daniel Lanigan ; Wards 7 and 
^, W. Y Lovctt ; W ards 9 and 10, John J. Noland ; Wards 11 and 
E', M.Mood. 



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VI City Government. 

POLICE. 

Chief— J. Elmore JNIartin. 
Pirst Lieut snant—F, J. Heidt. 
Second Lieutenant— E. A. Mollenliauer. 
Third Lieutenant—J. H. Fordhara. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. ' 

' J. L. Tobias, Chairn-an ; Middleton Michel, M. D., Allard Mem- 

minger, M. D., G. E Mar.igaiiU, M. D., C. P. xVimar, R. M. Marshall, 

M. A. Connor, A. Sydney «mith, Hall T. McGce, W. P. Carnngton, 

T. R. MeGahan. 

•Health Officer and Secretary of the Board— H. P>. Horlbeck, M. D. 

Clerk— Henry F. Faber. 

Sanitary Inspectors— District No. 1, I\I. Bolger ; District Xo. 2, J. 
P. O'Keill ; District No. 3, A. A. Barbot ; District No. 4,.E. S. Mikell, 

Health Detective— F. Nipson. 

City Dispensary Physicians— Health District No. 1, XjancMulIally, 
M. B.; Healih District No. 2, Barnard E.}3aker, M. D,; Health Dis- 
trict No. 3, E.J. Kinloch, M. D.; Health District No. 4, Joseph 
Maybank, :\L D.; Health District No. 5, W. Taylor Edmunds, M. D.; 
Health District No. 6, W. B. Byan, M. D. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Board of Fire Masters— F." S. Eodgers, Chairman ; G. 11. "\Yalter, 
E. F. Sweegan, A. Stemmerman, R. C. Barkley, O. E. Valk, and the 
Mayor. 

Chief— F. L. O'Neill. 

First Assistant Chief— W. H. Smith. 

Second Assistant Chief— T. S. Sigwald. 

Clerk— B. M. Strobel. 

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Trustees — The Mayor and City Recorder are ex-ojjicio members of 
the Board ; Hon. G. S. Bryan, Alderman C. S. Gadsden, and W. St. 
Julien Jervey, with the e.v-<\iJicio members, represent the City in the 
Board. The remaining members of the Board are, Messrs. Ch. Rich- 
ardson Miles, President of the Board ; Rudolph Siegling, Vice-Pre- 
sident ; G. W. Dingle, G. Lamb Buist, Rev. C. C. Pinckney, D. D., 
C. n. Simonton, John F. Ficketi, H. A. M. Smith. 

Secretary and Treasurer— Jacob Williman. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON. 

Trustees— Julian jMitchell, President ; Rev. C. C. Pinckney, D. D., 
C, R. Miles, J. H. Steiumeyer, Zimmerman Davis, A. B. Rose, J. P. 
K. Bryan, Dr. H. Baer, T. P. Lowndes, Hon. Wm. A. C^urtenay, and 
the Mayor ex-ofilcio. 

Secretary— il. G. O'Neale. 



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Qity (jovermneni. vii 



. DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES. 

WM. ENSTON HOME. 

Trustees of tlie Fund for Surviving Anniiitants—IIon, Wni. A. 
Oourlenay, Clinlrniau ; John F. Ficken. W. Enston Butler. 

Trustees of the Home— Hou. Wm. A. Cointonay, Presidejit ; Alva 
Gage, Vice-President ; W. G. iMuckenfuss, E. H. Jacksou, G. W. Wil- 
liams, Jr., W. Enston Butler, A. B. Rose, Clias. R. Valk, C. P. Aiinar, 
J. P. K. Bryan. W. J. :\Iillcr, W. E. Huger, and the IVlayor cx-officio. 

Secretary— iNl. B. Paine. 

ORPHAN HOUSE. 

Commisioners— Jacob Small, Chairinan ; Dr. J. S. Buist, V. C. 
J3ibble, PL PI. PeLeon. J. M. Eason. T. D. Jervey, T. G. Main, Dr. B. 
"a. Muckeufuss, F. J. Pelzer, L. C. A. Poessier, T. A. Wilbur, G. \V. 
Williams. 

Principal and Superintendent—Miss A. K. Irving. 

Teachers— Miss M. L. LeQueux, Mrs. A. L. Reilly, Miss C. Arnold, 
Miss M. McNeill, Miss K. Lent, assistant. 

Matrons— Mrs. M. F. Perry, IMrs. M. P. Shav/, J^Irs. M. D. Lucas, 
Miss L. McDermid. 

Sewing Department— Mrs. A. V. Webb. 

Engineer— A. L. Barton. 

Secretary of the Bopad and Treasurer of the Private Fund— IC. 
iMontaguo Grimke. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

Commissioners— Dr. J. L. Ancruni, Chairman ; G. W. Dingle, Vice- 
Chairman; Thomas Delia Torre, Secretary ; A. Stemmermann, Zim- 
merman Davis, R. A. Pringle, A. W. Taft, H. ^Y; Hummel, T. T. 
Hyde, Hall T. McGee- 

Superlntendent— C. L. DuBos. 

ALMS HOUSE. 

Commissioners— E. S. Burnham, Chairman ; H. Klatte, Vice- 
Chairman ; J. M. Connelley, Secretary and Treasurer, J. H. Graham, 
Morris Harris, A. Johnson, Dr. B. M. Lebby, J. D. Murphy, A. B. 
Murray, K. C. Stello, J. A- Tiencken, C Wulbern. 

Master— H. G. Frazer. 

Matron— Mrs. E. M, Frazer. 

Clerk-M.B. Rysan. 



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viii City Goven-amml. 



ASHLEY RIVER ASYLUM. 

Coinmlssioners of Public Lands— R. S. Cathcart, Cbairmiui; \V. 
J. Purker, Vice Chairinau ; F. A. Lord, Secretary and Treasurer ; 
E. J Beaird, J. P. Collins. H. Haesloop, James Laffaii, C. C. Leslie, 
L. D. Mablstedt, W. G. Relikopf, J. P,. Siramoiis, L. K. Williams. 

Steward Ashley River Asjdum— Thomas M. Holmes. 

Matron Acliley Itiver Asyliim— Mrs. Adeline J. HDlmes. 

Grave Digger, Potter's Field—Boston Sweeper. 

■ MARKET AND GREEN GROCERIES. 

Commissioucrs ~T. Campbell, Chairman ; J. PI. Graman, John 
Burns, S. C.Gilbert, Robt. Graham, J. G. Gradcliek, A. A. Kroeg, 
George M. Lavaek, John ]\rcP:]ree, W. J. Miller, W. F. Strong, T. S. 
Wilbur, I>. C. Pobertson. 

Chief Clerk- G. W. Rouse. 

Assistant Clerk— J. M. Axson. 

Clerk Weights and Measures— John E. Thames. 

MARION SQUARE. 

Commissioners -Col. A. Coward, Chairman; Maj. B. H. Rutledge, 
Gen. R. Siegling, Maj. G. B. Edwards, Gen. T. A. Huguenin, Capt 
Alex. W. Marshall. 



COLONIAL COMMON AND ASHLEY RIVER 
EMBANKMENT. 

Commissioners — Casper A. Chisolm, Chairman ; S- S. Buist, Secre- 
tary and Tieasuier; A. B. Hose, F. E. Taylor, Dr. Wm. P. O'NeilJ, 
C. U. Shepard, Jr., C. 11. Miles, Eugene P. Jervey, A. DeCaradeuc, 
Lanier Eason, and the Maj^or. 

COMMISSIONERS OF BATHING HOUSES. 

Dennis O'Neill, Chairman; John C. Tiedeman, Secretary; L. E. 
Williams, Zimmerman Davis, J. B. Reeves, J. D. Murphy, C. Frisius. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FOR THE 

MANAGEMENT, CUSTODY AND 

CARE OF CONVICTS. 

A. A. Kroeg, Chairman ; J. D. Murphy, Vice-Chairman ; Gadsden 
Phillips, Secretary ; Benjamin Mclnnes, Jr., Henry Sohl. 
Superintendent' of the Guard — W. H. Ha^sall. 



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INDEX. 



Page. 

MAYOli FlCKEN'S KeVIHW... , , 1 

Treasury Department IG 

Report of City Assessor 24 

Iveport of City Sberiff. 47 

Keport of Corporatiuii Counsel V.) 

Report of Street Department 52 

Department of Health CO 

Report of llcaltli f^fTicer , 88 

Report of Tidal Drain Keeper , 132 

])kpaktment of Charities — 

Orpban House 113 

Shirras Dispensary 125 

City Hospital 131 

Alms House 13^ 

William Huston Home 142 

Old Folks' Home 115 

Dei'aktment of Police— 

Report of Fire Department. 147 

Report of Chief, of Police ..152 

Report of Commissioners, jNIanagement of Convicts. ,.167 

Peea.suke CJkouxds— 

Marion Square 170 

Colonial Common and Lake 171 

Lower Wards Pleasure Grounds.....' 172 

Tapper Wards Pleasure Grounds 174 

Public Markets 175 

Harbor Ma-ter's Report... 175 



i 



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X Indc.r. 

EDurATiDX IX Chaiu.kstox— Fagr 

Suporintendeut Archer's RejK)rt 170 

High School of Charleston ...L'>-') 

The College of Charleston ISS 

■ Ordinaxces Ratified Dukixg Yeak 1892 103 

Acts of the LECriSEATUKE ReExVTixg to the Crrv of Chakles- 

Tox, Passed Dueixg Year 1802 201 



APr^KNE)i:><:. 



Sketch of The South Carolina Military Academy 205 



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^aijoi^ Ficl^en'^ Annual ?fm^. 



CITY OF CHAELESTOiS^, 

Executive Depaetment, 

February 2cl, 1S93. 
2h the OUij Council of Charleston : 

It is prescribed by ordinance that " it shall be the duty of 
tlie IMayor, as soon after the close of eacli year of liis term of 
office, as is practicable, to present, to the City Council the an- 
nual reports of tlie several dej)art]nents of the City govern- 
ment for the previous year, reviev/ing tlie same vith sncli re- 
commendations in relation thereto, as may seem to him advan- 
tageous to the public service." The first year of my term of 
office has expired, and pursuant to the above cited requireinent 
of the law, I ask leave to submit hcrevv-ith for your informa- 
tion, the annual reports of the several departments of the 
municipal government for the year 1S92, together with my 
review of the same. 

• DEPxiKTMEXT OF THE CITY TEExiSUKY. 

Tlie annual report of the City Treasurer is both interesting 
and encouraging, and will repay a careful examination. Our 
obligations have been met as they became due; the interest 
on the public debt has been promptly paid, and all expendi- 
tures were kept safely within the current income of the year, 
leaving a small surplus which was covered into the treasury, 
and placed to the credit of the general income account of the 
year 1893. 

The total income of the City from all sources, for the year 
ending 31st December, 1S92, amounted to 6639,742.38, which 
with the surplus of 810,887.8^, brought forward from i\\Q last 
year of the preceding administration, (which surplus included 
$2,094.77 in bonds receivable,) made the total cash resources 
for the year, §050,630.20. 



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2 Mo.yor Fichenh Jv/nnal Review. 

T]ie total expenditures dnrin«r the year ending 31>t I)e- •, 

ceiiiber, 1S92, including unexpenrled halanccs of a])propria- j 

lions, sunnncd up J^03S,S20.o5, leaving in tlic treasury at the j 

close of tlie said year, a sui-plus, including bonds receivable, of j 

Sll,809.65. j 

The total net receipts and the expenditures for tlie year | 
1892, may be briefly stated as follows : 

Surplus brought forward from the year 1S91 S 10,887 82 

Ket collections of iha tax of 22 mills 451,599 lY - 

Net Collections of License Tax 107,770 50 

Collectiojis of unpaid Taxes of previous years 15,757 51 

Proceeds of ■ sale of K5<:y:)00, 5 per cent, bonds, 
issued for redemption of a like amount of 7 per 

cent, bonds 50,331 25 

Eeceipts from miscellaneous sources 14,283 ^2 

Total receipts §^650,630 20 

Total expenditures, including unexpended bal- 
ances of appropriations, and the redemption of 
$50,000 of 7 per cent, bonds, which matured 
on October 1st, 1892 $638,820 55 

Surplus balance 31st December, 1892. . Sll,S09 65 

The public debt -was reduced during the past year, by the 
payment of $18,600 of 7 per' cent, bonds, which matured on 
October 1st, 1892. This payment was made out of the pro- 
ceeds of the one mill tax, which was levied for the pur- 
poses^ of the sinking fmid. There remain outstanding 7 
per cent, bonds, which matured on the date last named, 
amounting to $1,400, none of which were presented for pay- 
ment. The cash to meet these is on hand, and, when paid, 
there will be a total reduction of the debt footing up the sum 
of $20,000. 

There has also been a reduction of two per cent, in the rate 
of interest on $50,000 of the bonded indebtedness, thus saving 
to the city annually the sum of one thousand dollars in inter-- 



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Mayor Fichen^s Annual Tlcvieiu. 



est. Tlii.'i reduction was brought aLoiit by the issue of ^50,000 
ui .J |>ui' ctMLt. buuds, vN'bich ueie sold and the proceeds of 
wldcli Avere used in tlie I'edeniption of a hke amount of T per 
cent, bonds, Avhicli matured on 1st October, 1S92. 

Tlie Coininissioners of tlic Sinkijig Fund deemed it a inore 
prudent policy to cancel and' destroy the city bonds Avhich, 
during the ]>ast year, were purchased by them with the pro- 
ceeds of the one mill tax, and with yoirr concnrrence this' 
policy was adopted. By pursuing this course the great re- 
sponsibility of safely keeping these negotiable securities was 
avoided, and that much of the de1>t was paid and absolutely 
retired. The cancellation by the Sinkhig Fund Commission 
of the sold 82<->,000 of 7 per cent, bonds makes a further 
aimual saving of 81,4()0 in interest. 

The total bonded indebtedness of the city, as it existed on 
the 31st December, 1S92, will appear in the following state- 
ment : 

4 per cent, bonds due 1909 - §3.390,200 00 

5 per cent, stock due October 1st, 1923 ^ 50,000 00 

-0 per cent, bonds dne October, 1SS3 1,000 00 

per cent, bonds due October, 1S98.. .§1S,000 

6 per cent, bonds due April, 189S 91,500 109,500 00- 

^^G per cent, old city stock 772 61 

-^7 per cent, bonds due October, 18S3, $ 500 00 
^>7 per cent, bonds due October, 1891, 600 00 
••7 percent, bonds dne October, 1892, 1,900 00 3,000 00 

7 per cent, bonds dne October, 1893,§62,100 00 
7 per cent, bonds due October, 1894, 73^700 00 
7 per cent, bonds due October, 1895, 91,500 00 
7 per cent, bonds due October, 1896, 67,000 00 

7 per cent, bonds due October, 1897, 20,000 00 314,300 00 

5 per cent, stock College of Charleston 23,000 00 

$3,891,772 61 

'^^ These amounts should be deducted as they 
are jjast due, and the cash for the payment of 
the same is in the treasury \ , 4,772 61 

Leaving a total bonded indebtedness of $3,887,000 00 



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4 Mayor Fichn^s Annual Bcvlno. 

In tills coTiiiGction it is cricoura<j'-ni£z: to note tlie jrradual 
reduction of liio public dchtj Avliich iuis taken place since tlie 
year ISVO. Much of this reduction was accomplished some 
years ago by ap]">lying tliereto the proceeds of the sale of cer- 
tain raih-oad stocks held by the city. Tlie reduction made 
during the past year will foot up §20,000, as aboye stated. 



In January, ISTO, the City debt amounted to. .85,241,709 77 
In Jaimary, 1893, the City debt amounted to. . 3,891,772 61 



Decrease. $1,349,937 IG 

' The saving in the annual outlay for interest on the public 
debt is equally encouraging. 

In 1870 tlie appropriation for interest was $314,557 58 

In 1893 the appropriation for interest was 167,829 00 



Decrease 8146,728 58 



The contribnlion made by the present administration to this 
very desirable improvement in onr finances is small, but if 
each administration will see to it that the work of reducing our 
indebtedness is carried on to the same extent, the time will 
soon arrive when our debt will cease to be burdensome. 

defaht:\ient of the city assessor. 

The City Assessor presents a full and carefully prepared 
report containing much valuable information. The duties of 
this department have been largely increased by the transfer 
from the Treasurer to the Assessor of the entire work of re- 
ceiving and preparing applications for licenses, and assessuig 
the license tax of delinquents. 

I commend the Assessors's report to your careful study. It 
will be seen that the increase in the assessments of real estate 
over those of the year 1891 amounts to $83,496 and of per- 
sonalty to $471,596. 

The assessor has appended to his report a tabulated statement 
setting forth the annual assessmeutf> of real and personal prop- 



THE STEEET DEFAETMENT. 

The report "of the Superintendent of Streets conveys full 
information as to the character and amount of work done in 
1892. It will be seen that the total casli receipts of the de- 
]>artment for the year including the appropriations for the 
scavenger division, and for general- maintenance amounted to 
8101,400.44:. This of course includes the j)roceeds of the two 
Jiiili betterment tax which yielded $40,782.62. 

During the last decade a large amount of valuable and en- 
during work has been done, in the construction of long lines 
•'f l>elgi;\u block stone roadvrays through the principal traflic 



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Mayor Fichm^s Animal tlcvicw. 5 

crty, together with the rate of taxation, for each year, of the 
cpvif^o. r>f yp^rs oxte7idin<>; from the year 1S70 to the year 1892 
inclusive.. The information contained in this table is as valua- 
ble as it is interesting. From an examination of tlie diflereiit 
levies it will be seen tliat the rate of taxation — 22 niills— levied 
in 1892, is as low as any levy. which has been made since the 
year 1887. 

DEPAETMETnT of THE CITY SHEEIFF. 

The report of the City Sheriff shows a collection of delin- 
fpient general taxes amomithig to $19,326.81, of delinquent 
license taxes amounting to $1,468 and of delincpient school 
taxes amounting to §1,159.49. These collections cover arrear- 
ages extending as far back as 1SS2. Under the changes made in 
tlie license ordinance for tlie 3^ear 1892 in the mode of collecting- 
license taxes, the duties of the City Sheriff have been largely ni- 
creased, inasmuch as he is required without the delay incideiit 
to legal proceedings, to collect delinquent license taxes directly 
through a simple tax execution. A ])rompt levy and distraint 
under a tax execution is a summary proceeding, which will 
probably prove to be a more expeditious method of collection, 
than a tedious suit at law. The municipality, however, will 
still have the choice of either method, as occasion may require. 
The City Sheriff has discharged his important duties with 
iirmness, fidelity and accuracy. 



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6 Mayor I^icheih Anmial Bcvlcvj. 

streets of the city. Tills work, altliough cosily, was nccessnry, 
Riirl hvs pn^yor? to liavc hceii iu iv.iuiy ways an excelleiit in- 
vestment. 

Inasmncli, Jiowcver, as most of oni' business tlioroughfares 
liave been ])aved in the manner above referi-ecl to, it was 
thought best to curtail tliis ])articu]ar class of sti-ect irnprove- 
meiit with a view to the constructioii of a greater amount of 
flagstone sidewalks or footways for pedestrians. The Com- ' | 

mittee on Sti'cets accordingly determined to devote the greater \ 

part of the betterment ap])ropriation to the latter purpose. It ? 

was generally recognized that a YQvy large portion of the city | 

stood in need of better sidewalks, nevertheless, l;)ut little could \ 

be d.one in any one year towards satisfyhig this great iieed. ] 

The happy thought occurred to Alder}nan "Williams, the ener- ] 

getic and most efficient chairman of the Committee on Streets, \ 

that a stone footway of the uniform width of three feet might } 

be laid on the sidewalks of some of the sti-eets, instead of cov- i 

ering the entire width of each sidewalk with flagstone as had \ 

heretofore been the practice. There would of course reinain \ 

.uupaved on both sides of the footway a small margin of the 
sidewalk, ^vhich could be planted in grass or covered with 
shell at a small cost. The Committee promptly adopted the 
suggestion, and it was at once carried into elfect, 

A large amount of this work was done during the past year 
and it has given general satisfaction. The work is quickly | 

done at, of course, much less cost for labor and material than | 

by the other method, and good pavements have in this way I 

been laid in many streets, v.'hich otherwise would not be | 

reached for a lono- time to come. Most of the sidewalks so % 

improved were also supplied with blue stone curbing. | 

- It will be noticed, however, that in some streets which are -J 

great thoroughfares, the entire width of the sidewalk was cov- 
ered with flagstones. This was notably the case on the north 
side of Line Street, from ]^[eeting Street to the tracks of the 
S. C. Eailway Company, on tlie north side of Broad Street, 
from Meeting to King street, on the north side of "Wentworth 
Street, from Coming to Smith Street, and on the east side of 
Church Street, from Erc^ad to Queen Street, all of which work 



. '-r ■■!'■, ^'i 



>«iR?.Wi(^.a-ftj'?r^".jf**i^Jiw^.i 



2 fay or Fichen^s Annual JRevietv. 7 

was clone during tlie past }"oai'. Farts of the sid(3walks of 
lint] 0(1 !.:e, ivlazyck, Calhoun, JMarket, Ladson, Ilasell, Frank- 
lin, and Hudson streets have also, during the year, been 
paved the entire width., with Ihigstones. 

]Notwithstanding the large amount of improvements to side- 
wall:s, a considerable deal of work was also done in laying 
Belgian block stone roadway's. Fortions of the roadways of 
Line, Chapel, King, Archdale, Church and Queen Streets were 
paved witli Belgian blocks. The parts of the roadways of 
Archdale and Queen Streets so inijjj'oved, were laid with a 
margin of cobble stones, on both sides of the central pave- 
ment of Belgian blocks, forming a combination roadway. 

It will thus be teen that a large amount of excellent and 
permanent work was done on the streets during the past 
year. 

The continued improvonent of the drainage of our streets 
has also been maintained, and a largo amount of pipe drains 
was laid during the year in various parts of the City, a par- 
ticular account of which appears in the report of the Superin- 
tendent of Streets. 

Early in the year, our esteemed fellow citizen, Maj. Geo. A. 
Wagoner, drew my attention to the value of the cinders of iron 
pyrites, as an inexpensive material, well adapted for the con- 
struction of smooth and noiseless roadways in our residence 
streets. He kindly procured a donation from the Chicora 
Fertilizer Compaliy, of some seventy-five tons of the material 
in order that the experiment might be made, and in the month 
of April last, upwards of one hundred square yards of the 
roadway of Spring Street, immediately east of Chestnut 
Street, were paved Avith the cinders. 

I believe that this material, if properly manipulated, will 
make a smooth and substantial roadway, and the Committee 
on Streets has resolved to experiment with the material next 
year on a larger scale. 

The scavenger division has been managed most satisfac- 
torily, and the streets have been kept clean. Mr. J. C. "W . 
BischolT,. the zealous and efficient head of the division, has 
kept his force under excullent discipline, md has secured the 



w W W P ^fW g Wg f ^^ 



S MmjoT Fichen^s Annual Review. 

best results. Tlie garbage was jiroinptly removed eacli day, 
and tlirowTi ont into tbe rnnrslios m tlie iiortb-enstern section 

• of the City, at points far removed from Imman habitations. i 

Se-s'eral new streets were opened during the year. Ladson I 

Court was not only widened, but has been extended through j 

to King Street. Ashley Sti-eet has been extended from its ! 

former terminus just west of Spring Street, up to Line Street, I 

where it forms a junction with Payne Street. The extension - \ 

of Lynch Street to Tradd, will thus give us a continuous j 

drive^vay from the water's edge on Tradd Street, through | 

]^ynch and Ashley Streets, far up into the farm territory on j 

the -northern boundary of the City. As the name Ashley is ! 

preserved, in that of the river which forms the western boun- \ 

dary of our City, it has been suggested that we perpetuate an • f 

historic name, by calling the drive Lynch Avenue. Jvracke 1 

and Eosemont Streets have also been opened as will be seen ! 

in the report. \ 

The levels and grades for the street work were furnislied 

by Mr. L. J. Barbot, the City Civil Engineer. j 

THE COl^YICT FOKCE. | 

On the J 6th June, 1892, the City Council duly ratified an 
Ordinance to create a Eoard for the management, custody and 
care of convicts, sentenced to hard labor on the public streets, 
squares, alleys and lanes of the City, for violations of City 
Ordinances, or for other offences. At the same meeting of 
tlie City Council, the following Commissioners for the man- 
agement of convicts were elected under the provisions of the 
said Ordinance : — Aldermen A. A. Kroeg and J. D. i\Iurphy, 
and. Messrs. Benj. Mclimes, Jr., Gadsden Phillips and Henry 
Sold, Thus was inaugurated for the first time in our history, 
a system by which the cruninal classes, whose care and custody 
annually cost the taxpayers large sums of money, are com- 
pelled to render useful labor hi return for the food which j 
they consume. \ 

The first squad of convicts v/as put to work in the month of | 

July last, under the direction of i^lr. W. II. Ilalsall, who bad | 

been elected Superintendent of the Guards, and from that \ 



flil^jiw^yyyy»g^«'i?« ^ 



Mayor Fichn^^ Annual Ucmeiv. 9 

time, Sundays, liolidays ciiid rainy days excepted, there lias 
bo.nn coidijnuillv in active service, a force s]io\vin['^ a daily 
average of iiftceu prisoners. 

It has been thought best to confine tbtC convicts to work on 
tlie streets and roads north of Sheplierd street, wliere tlie 
population is sparse, and great improvenients liave been made 
in that section, at no cost to the xtlnnicipality, other than the 
original outlay for tools, uniforms and weapons for the 
Guards, and sundry other small incidental expenses. 

The experiment is being watched by the taxpayers with 
great interest. Our thanks are due to the Commissioners and 
to their able Chairman, Alderman Kroeg, for the successful 
manner in wliich thc^^ have managed this important depart- 
ment. A vast amount of work has been done on the neck, at 
less than one-half of the usual cost.' 

THE REPOllTOF THE COIIPOEATIOX COUlN^SEL. 

Several important cases have been conducted in behalf of 
the city by the Corporation Counsel during the past year, the 
particulars of wliich are set out in his excellent report. The 
cases have been managed v/ith the usual skill and iidelit}' 
which characterize the work of this official. One of these cases 
was brought to enforce the collection of the cost of tilling low 
grounds within tlie city limits, and the others for the collec- 
tion of license taxes. All of these cases are still pending in 
one phase or another, and are of great importance to the 
]nib]ic. The Corporation Counsel has also been called upon 
frequently during the year for opinions on questions of great 
concern to the taxpayers, and invariably^ responded promptly 
and with satisfactory results. 

THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The vigilance and energy which for years have characterized 
the management of the Health Department, have during the 
p;i"^t season secured for our city the best results. 

During last summer great care was exercised in all the sea- 
l"-'rts of the Atlantic coast to prevent the introduction of 



1 



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10 Mayor Fidxn\^ /hinual Picvicw. 

cholera whiclv had become epidonilc in llainhurf!:, Germany, 
an<i liad modo. its appcarajicc in other European ports. In 
order to make sure that all private premises within tlie limits 
of our city were put and kept in the most cleanly condition, I 
organized a system of volunteer Sanitary Insjiectors at no cost 
to the Municipality. I named two residents of each block in 
the city who at my recpiest consented to ser\'e as -volunteer hi- 
spectors of each lot in their respective blocks, and to report to. 
the Health officer all nuisances, and other matters requiring 
the attention of the department. By this means in a remark- 
ably short space of time we had full reports of the existence 
O'f evils requiring immediate attention, and were enabled to j 

apply such remedies as were needed. Happily for us no in- i 

fectious or contagious disease found lodging within our | 

limits. The appointments of tliese inspectors have all been t 

revoked, and I take this opportunity of again thanking them * 

in behalf of tlie city fur their valuable services. I 

In the early part of the year the City Couiicil in its wisdom f 

saw fit to make a radical change in the law relating to the Dis- I 

pensary Physicians, by which, these excellent officials were al- | 

lowed to take private practice. I took occasion at the time | 

of the passage of the ordiiutnce to express my objections to ^ 

the system, and I still liold the same views. I 

The city as usual has been free from any epidemic during | 

the summer, and the number of deaths from typhoid fever I 

w^as only twenty-seven, being a smaller number of deaths from | 

this catise than iji any one season since 1SG5. | 



The number of deaths from diarrhceal diseases was large, 
and it would seem that the causes are removable. If these 
causes are impure and unwholesome food, it argues neglect on 
our part not to have a proper food inspection. I commend to 
yotir earnest consideration the views expressed on this subject 
by our able and experienced Health officer. 

A renewed interest has been, manifested in the matter of 
securing a proper method for promptly conducting all sewer- 
age from the city to some general place of disposal where the 
same may be burned or otlierwise disposed of in an elfective 
manner. 

The Committee on Sewerage are giving the subject the 



|;piy.'»LtP!w ^ u' -J^ < r. W" ? T»i!'< Wg ! ** r' S^^ m tfi Uf.t'V'W i k " i.»iii^ <> w ' , I ' ..m, fj ' .* ' . % .. i tWH|,iwy , ' 



Mayor FichcrCs Annual Pwrievj. 11 I 

most careful study, and luive taken active steps to secure a 
pv'p''^ f^^r-oy ;>f tlio city with a view to tlie ])]'e]iaration of a 
]iia]:» sliowing levels, grades aud the like infonaation as a basis 
for making plans and estimates for a sev/erage system, ^o 
more important matter can engage our attention. 

THE TIDAL DEAI^S. ^ f 

The report of tliis department shows the items of cx])endi- f 

ture made during the year. The condition of the tidal drains * 

is snch that in the near future it may become necessary to ^ 

provide the same with more substantial bottoms than they now \ 

have. It appears that great irregularities in the levels of ', 

these bottoms exist, rendering it ahnost impossible to thorough- • 
ly cleanse the same by Hushing the drains with tide water. 

The present mode of cleaning these drains is highly objection- ] 
able and some other method sJiould be devised. 

Tlie tidal drain keeper has been attentive to his duties and ■ 

has rendered efficient service. « | 

DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES. • 

The Orphan Ilou^e as will appear froiu the report of the | 

Connnissioners continues to be maintained in excellent condi- l 

tion. The grade of the school is kept up to its nsual staiidard. i 

The health of the children has been good. The accomplished { 

and efficient principal continnes to render the best of service. ;. 

The Sliirras Dispensary has done good ser^dce during the | 

year, and through its instrumentality a useful charity has been ! 

dispensed. The report of the Treasurer shows an increase iu I 

the investments. - j 

The City Hospital continues to sup23ly a most necessary > 

service to the 2:)ublic. " A large number of people are annually ; 

treated there for a variety of diseases. During the past year . ; 
1,001 free patients and 115 pay patients w^ere admitted. The 
total earnings of the hospital for the year footed up ^3,557. Tl^, 
and tlie total cost of running the institution for the twelve 

months was §23,611.37. Although the expense of maintain- -; 

ing this institution ^6'r OAipita of patients will compare favor- :' 

ably with other institutions of like character, the present board ; 

of (Commissioners i.-^ ende;ivoring to rednce the cost of maiTi- ■ 
ti'iuiuee without impairing the efficiency of the hospital. 

s' 
\ 
\ 



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1^ Mayor FicJccn^s Armual Review. 

TJic ])ericficeTit cliaritj of our Alms House lias been care- 
fully n.^rl c:;Tti::f:,r.torily clispeiised diii-iiigthc past year. Tlie 
3iiajority of tlio inmates are aged per^'.ons who are entirely 
without means. The average number who found liomes in the 
institution during the year was eighty, and besides these, there 
were one Inmdred and sixty-two out-door pensioners who 
simply draw I'ations. 

The AYilliaiu Enston Home lias, during the past year, af- 
forded a comfortable home, with light and fuel, to fiom 
seventy-five to eighty persons. This is indeed a magjiificent 
charity, wliich, for generations to come, will remain as an 
enduring jnomiment to its noble and generous founder. The 
account of the Trustees shows the receipts from all sources, 
and how the same have been expended. A schedule of tlie 
assets is appended thereto. 

The Trustees of the 'William Enston Anmntants' Fund in 
their account make an encouraging exhibit. The face or par 
value of the assets constituting the fund amount in the aggre- 
gate to $217,700, and the cost of the same to §vi9S,l-25. 

The Ashley Iviver Asylum has been managed with care and 
efficiency during the past year. An abundance of wholesomxC 
food and also comfortable lodgings were furnished to the 
inmates, who are aged colored persons. IsTearly five hundred 
dollars of the appropriation remaiiied unexpended iat the close 
of the yeai"j and all proper wants were satisfied. 

THE FIKE DEPAETMEKT. | 

This useful and efficient depa^rtnient has been well managed j 

under the careful supervision of the excellent Board of Fire | 

Masters. The cost of this branch of tlie service is great, but | 

it cannot in my judgment be reduced without seriously | 

impairing its efficiency. Indeed, if we could afford to do so, ! 

an increase in the appropriation, so as to enlarge the force of | 

active men, might very properly be made. ! 

During the year a serious lire occurred at the South Carolina I 

Military Academy greatly damaging the building of that insti- | 

tution, but the insurance on the lu'operty enabled the Board of - 

Yisitors to make a complete restoration of the buildings. } 



IjffijgBj^iyBlfflpyfi y t> : 5 ! y;»^ " "i'^y^*^ 



Mayor Ficken's Annual Rcviau. 13 



THE POLICE DEPAHTMENT. 

Tills necessary and useful department luis been niaintaiucd 
in a higli state of efficiency. The zealous and indefatigable 
Chief, Capt. J. Ehnore ]\Iartin, and his experienced Lieuten- 
ants, liave rendered most acceptable service. 

Tlie force is kept under excellent disciplijie, and peace and 
good order have been ])reserved. 

The report of tlie Chief contains full and valuable informa- 
tion, I would call attention to the fact that the space for 
stables is so contracted that arrangements had to be made 
for quartering the horses on a lot in the vicinity. 

PAKKS AKD PLEASITKE GROUNDS. 

These public resorts are in good condition. They all could 
be greatly improved and beautified. Y/'hite Point Garden is 
the popular resort of our own people, and is visited by all 
strangers who come to ou.r city. Tlie roadways of East Bat- 
tery and South Battery which connect with this resort need 
improvement, and it is to be hoped that we will be able to give 
this subject early attention. 

Our city needs more and larger Parks, and this want should 
be kept in view. 

JSTo better investment can be made than the purchase of 
several lumdred acres of land in our suburbs for the purpose 
of converting the same into a beautiful and attractive park ; 
and I trust that it will be in the power of the present admin- 
istration to carry this suggestion into effect. 

PUBLIC MARKETS. 

The account of the Clerk of the Market shows an increase 
of revenue over the previous year, and the net earnings 
turned into the treasury amount to nearly six thousand dollars. 

I regard the increase of Green Groceries as an evil, requir- 
ing attention. It would be far better to have, say three or four 
Market Houses under careful inspection, than a large number 
of Green Groceries so scattered at distant points as to render 



p y,j>piyM y^ /v.i fy^ i ey' jl H ! H^ f ^^^ 



■ . ■ I 

\ • ! 

14 Mayor Fichcn's Anmlat Picvlev). \ 

i 

a proj^er meat inspection inipi-actic;i1)le, if not in'i])Ossible. T j 

coiiiiiiond ihis subject to your curetiil con.-ideration. j 

IIAEBOR ]\IASTEE'S EEPOKT. ; 

The report of CoL James Armstrong, tlic skilled and efil- 
cient Ilai'bor 7^[aster of onr Port;, is full and clear. It shows 
the tonnage arrivals for the ])ast year, which, it is to be - ob- 
served, do not equal those of 1S91. 

The facilities vrhich tliis port now furnishes must bring to 
\is a large increase in our business in the near future. The 
•work on the Jetties has been en ergeticallv prosecuted during 
the year, under the able supej" vision of Capt. F. Y. Abbott, 
United States Engii^eer, and tlio new channel is already in 
use. The outlook for deep water on our Bar is in every way 
encouraging. ; 

EDUCATIOISi. I 

i 

Xo subject ca]i be of deeper interest than the education of ; 

our children. Its value and importance are univei'sally recog- \ 

nized and need no encomium. Our Common School system \ 

is the pride and glory of the city, and together wntli other ; 

scliools and institutions of learning wliicli vre possess, all'ords i 
facilities for educating our youth which are exceptionally 
good. 

The High School of Charleston has done a noble work in 
the past, and continues to nuiintain its high standard. The j 
building, however, is no longer adequate to the wants of the | 
School. The attendance of pupils is now so large that it is \ 
with difficulty that proper accommodations can be had in the 
School house. For this reason an appeal was made to us for 
funds witli which to enlarge the present structure, or to erect 
a new one. That ap])eal has not been in vain, and it is earn- 
estly hoped that in the near future the rccpiisite amount will j 
,beinhand. } 

The College of Charleston- — that ancient seat of learning — . j 

continues to dispense the benefits of a classical education in | 

our communitv. To no sins^le institution in our midst do the \ 

people owe more than they do to tliis one. Within its classic | 



t'- jrf -h 



>^.^i«j ? ii y ?jt^fftiw.' ^ tej '' ^;f^y^^ ^ ^ 



Mayor Ficl:cn\'i Annual Review. ' 15 

jialls Lave been educated sons of Charleston, wlio liave slicd a 
liistre and a ii;iury upon their Alma l)Jate/A)y the fame they 
liavo won in professii'nal life, and in tlic marts of eoinnierco 
and linanee. Posscrising an endowment wliich well nigli 
makes it self-snstaining, this venerable school of learning has 
survived the calamities of war and the vast destruction of 
proj^erty which, war entailed. Having smTcndered to the 
City of Charleston years ago, valuable property, an under- 
standing was had with the College by ^^'hich the municipality 
imdertook to supplement its income Avith sncli annual a]:)pro- 
priations as might be found requisite to maintain the institu- 
tion at its high standard. This obligation we liave endeavored 
to m'eet. 

Disappointment is soiiietimes manifested at the small num- 
bc]' of students ^\'ho are educated at tlie College. It should 
be remembered, however, that in all communities it is l)ut a 
very small per centage of the population who are able, pecu- 
niarily, to make the sacrifices necessary to obtain a collegiate 
education. Few young men can aft'ord to spend the required 
period of four years in study. The vast majority are com- 
i)elled at an earlv ag-e to be2;in the strug-o-le for bread. 

Let us keeij the vestal fires burninii' bric;htlv on the altars 
of this time-honored seminary of classic learning ! 

I ask leave here to make oiir acknowledgments of the many 
courtesies extended to the municipality by Mr. L. X. Jesu- 
nofsky in furnishing tlie useful information disseminated from 
time to time by tlie U. S. Weatlier Bureau, and also for the 
^aluable table of statistics compiled by him and appended 
to the reports of this year for publication. 

Having thus bi'iefly reviewed the several re];)orts which have 
been preseiited, permit me gentlemen, in conclusion, to return 
thanks to our officials, one and all, for faitliful vrork, and to 
the Commissioners of our various Boards for their gratuitous 
service and unselfish devotion to duty. 

JOim F. FICKE]N", 

Mayor, 



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. -EbQ . G ;^3-" t. t. t:. J- g 
• : v« -'X' i>:^-2 o :;:) i ri -3 









"" ; S 2 5 ^ 
1 c c c^ 



- ^ r '-^ ^ 



^ 2 :i l;^ 



c/r -D -.-^ 



s |ri|7-H|^ 



c .X u c p c c c . 



^yt. yij,, W i »B .)g l! J jg;^r^ /f, m>ltH ;, ^^ 



20 Mayor Ficken's Annual Review. 

Cash Transactions of the Co>fMissiONKRS Sinking Fund 
(EoiiFEiTED Lands), from Januaky 1, 1892, to Decem- 
BEK 31, 1892. 

RECEIPTS. 

To balance from ktst aunual statement % 232 09 

" arrears State taxes 100 00 

" State taxes 5 51 

" City taxes 136 81 

*' Peualties.... ,,.. 25 41 

" Commissioner Public Schools. 14 22 

"•Rents 80 40 

$644 44 

EXPENDITURES. 

By Insurance 9 00 

" Commissioners' Sinking Fund s.naount turned 

over 59 70 

" State taxes 1891 120 10 

" Balance.... 455 64 

_ $644 44 

ASSETS. I 

1 

Personal bonds $211 50 | 

Cash 455 64 | 

January 1, 1892, there \yere on hand 38 pieces of property | 

assessed at 23,375 00 " | 

Settled during the year 1802 2 pieces assessed at.. 1,325 00 f 

Unsettled December 31, 1892, 36 pieces assessed at 22,050 00 1 

_ _ ^ . I 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. 0. LEA, 
Deputy City Treasurer. 
Examined and found correct : 

H. BAER, 
Ohairviaii Committee Ways and Means. 



iiiij,.! ■^.iij^inj'T^ 



1 

f 

\ 



Financial department. 21 

(UsH Tkansactioins of the CoxMMissroNEKS Sinking Fund 
FROM January 1, 1S92, to Dkoembek 31, 1892. 

RECKIPTS. 

To balance from last annual statement ....% 80 30 

Sinking Fund Forfeited Lands 59 70, 

Appropriation Acc't, from one mill tax „ 20,391 29 

___ $20,531 29 ' 

EXPENDITURES. | 

By Stock Acc't, ^140 City Stock. $140 00 | 

Bond Acc't, $18,600 7 per cent. Bonds 18,600 00 \ 

Balance.... 1,791 29 \ 

. $20,531 29 

STATEMENT. , 

7 per cent. Bonds purchased during the year 

1892.,. $18,600 00 I 

Cancelled and destroyed 18,600 00 | 

. I 

City Stock, purchased during year 1892 §140 00 ; 

Cancelled 140 00 \ 

, \ 

CASH ? 

This Fund had January 1, 1892 $ 80 30 . j 

Received from all sources 20,450 99 I 

— ~ ' $20,531 29 1 

Fxpended for all purposes 18,740 00 | 

Balance $1,791 29 \ 

_: 1 

ASSETS. ' ! 

Cash. : 1,791 29 

• ___ — - — — I 

Respectfully submitted, ? 

J. 0. LEA, ; 

Deputy City Treasurer. . 

Examined and found correct : ) 

H. BAER, [ 

Chairman Committee Ways and Means, ] 



s?rf??';!«ff?^f^ro?!Rpp^^^ •==T^fiJ»5P"^S»WFT 



cent. Consols 1,912 24 



- 8,984 24 
19,027 15 



EXPENDITURES. 



1 



22 Mayor Ficlrn^^ Annual llcmew. \ 

Cash Transactions of the Trustees OKrnAN House Funds ] 

AND Jl^STATE, FROM J ANUAKY "IST, 1892, TO DECEMBER \ 

31sT, 1S92. __^ I 

RECEIPTS. I 

To Balance from last Annual Statement..... % 42 91 

To Interest Account— 

12 months' interest on $176,800 Four per Cent. 
Bonds, $7,072 00 

12 months' interest on $31,870 47 State 6 per 



By Amount paid over to City $8,984 | 

Balance 42 91 I 

$9,027 15 I 

— I 

ASSETS. ' I 

Four per Cent. Bonds City of Charleston $176,800 00 I 

State South Carolina 6 per cent. Consols 31,870 47 | 

Cash 42 91 | 

Respectful!}^ submitted. J. 0. LEA, | 

Deputy City Treasurer. \ 

Examined aud found correct : \ 

JACOB SMALL, \ 

Chainnaji Conuiirs. 0>pha?i House a?id Tnistee Orphan House % 

Funds and Estate. \ 



,p^^,mmf^^.>-'' r ^. ^ '.' '^ - mw^'^AS^^M^^ ] 



Finmidal JkparimcnL 23 

Cash Transactions CiTi^ College Fund from January ist, 

1892, TO DLCEMliKK 3 I ST, I 892. 
RECEIPTS. 

To Balance from last annual statement ? 21S 00 

To Ai^propriation Account from City for current 

expenses \ 2,000 OO 

To Interest Account on $75,500 Four per Cent. 

Bonds 3,020 00 

Interest on $23,000 Five per Cent Stock 1,150 CO 

$6,418 00 

EXPENDITURES, 

By amounts paid Jacob \V il lima n, Treasurer $6,418 00 

ASSETS. 

Four per Cent. Bonds City of Charleston .S75,5(K) 00 

Five per Cent, Stock City of Charleston 23,000 00 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. 0. LEA, 

Deputy City Treasurer, 
Examined and found correct : 

CHARLES H. SLMONTON. 

President Board Trustees College of Charleston. 



8J<?B^W!PPPS5^WP«^^ 



2^i Mayor Ficl'mi'>i Annucd Reviao. 



CITY ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



Assessor's Office, City Hall, 1 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st 1892. / 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council^ ' | 

of Charleston^ S. C. ! 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit my Annual s 

Report of this Department, for the fiscal year ending De- | 

cember 31st, 1892. " | 

The assessed value of Real and Personal Property re- \ 

turned for taxation, is as follows : \ 

Real Eestate : $14,960,920 / I 

Personal Property 7,02G,19G 1 

Total $21,987, 122--@ 22 Mills $483,716 68 



As compared with the returns for year 1891, the follow- 
ing increase is shown in assessments : 



Total gain over i^ssessmeats for 1891 1554,091 00 



The amount of regular applicatioDS issued for Licenses is..$107,175 50 



The amount of Licenses assessed is , $5,097 50 



169 New Buildings .Reported cost ?300,050 00 

137 Old Buildings Improved '' " 115,850 00 



Real Estate % 82.496 00 i 

Personal Property 471,595 00 ? 



Amount of Penalty assessied is $2,548 75 I 

Tiie number of Permits issued during the past year, for i 

the erection of buildings, and old buildings improved, is | 

as follows : I 



Total 306 Permits ** " $424,900 00 I 



S pfs : yW , ' !! ^iyjSU^ i ^.'l'j,U ' . v t ! ^'^*^^^ 



Olty Assessoi-^s Picpcyri. 25 \ 

i 

A detailed siatemeni showing the number of Pennits \ 
k^Awd iu the dillereut Wards, is atlaclied to tliis report, to 

which I refer. I 

The record of the sales of Real Estate kept during the \ 

year, shows an advance over assessraents in all the Wards j. 

of the city. | 

479 pieces, assessed for $535,285, sold for $876,390, an \ 

advance over assessments of 63.72 per cent. I 

I have prepared a statement showing the comparison of i 

assessments with sales in the different Wards, and the gene- I 

ral average in the city, w'hich is also appended to this re- \ 

port. I 

In addition to the usual statements furnished with my t 

Annual Reports, I have also prepared a recapitulation of • 
the rates of assessments and taxation for the years 1870 to 

1802, inclusive, to which I beg to call your attention as a .; 

matter of comparison. ^ 

1 also annex a recapitulation of the tax returns of the ] 

city for the year 1860. i 

xVecompanying this report I beg leave to hand the follow- ■; 

ing annexed statements, wdiich will furnish statistical in- ; 

formation of interest to your honorable body and all cor- I 

porators, to which I respectfully invite your attention. I 

Very respectfully your ob'dt servant, j 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, j 

Citi/ Assessor. 



?: ' t,y ^ yv^ j^;! pptf^:?!j ' ^^^^^^ 



26 Mayor Flckeiis Annual Ilcoicw. 



A. 

Statement of the Description and Yalue oe Personal 
Property Peturned for Taxation for Year 1892. 

1523 Horses and Mules : § 119,285 

261 Cows C,555_ 

831 Gold and Silver Watches and Plate 68,490 

477 Piano Fortes, Melodecns and Cabinet Organs 39,900 

436 Carriages, Buggies, &c 36,760 

1062 Wagons, Drays, Carts, &c 41,610 

589 Dogs 6,039 

Merchandise, IMoney and Credits pertaining to busi- 
ness of Merchants 1,997,271 

i\Iaterials, Jtlachinery, Engines, Tools and Fixtures 

of Manufacturers 925,197 

iVIoneys, Bank Bills and Circulating Notes on hand 

or deposit, and all Credits -" 202,644 

Receipts of Insurance Agencies 416,700 

Receipts of Express, Telegraph and Telephone Com- 
panies 35,262 

Capital Stocks of Banks 1,425,050 

Stocks of Phosphate Companies 66,285 

Stocks and Bonds of all other Companies, Corpora- 
tions and persons 1,109,513 

Vessels, Boats and other Floating Property 110,520 

All other Property, including Household Furniture... 419,115 



Total value of Personal Property $7,026,196 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

City Assesso7\ 
Charleston, S. C, December 1st, 1892. 



!! »>TOiuv^« a y ' y' yi r 'j^- <w ? rw^ 



City As.^essor's licpovL 27 



B. 

Statement of the Returns of Keal and Personal Pko- 
PERTT, Assessed for City Taxes for Years 1891 and 
1892. 



Total Real and Personal.. . $21,433,031— @22 Mills r>-i71,52G 68 



1892. 

R^alEoiate... $14,960,926 

Personal Property, ,... 7,026,196 

Total K^al and Fe?soDaL..S21,9S7,122-~@22 Mills $483,716 68 



As compared with Assessments for 1891 — 

'Gain on Eeal Estate is $ 82,496 

Gain in Personal Property is 471,595 

Total gain for 1892, as compared v/ith 1891 ?554,091 00 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Oiij/ Assessor. 
Chjirlestoiij S. C, December 3ist, 1892, 



1891. 

R<^al Estate $14,878,430 ] 

Personal Property 6,554,601 \ 



^«wB«ffi^?agy^^!!;w^«3^ ' ■ ■ ^^n^ 



28 



Mayor Ficl-en\s A'uriual Piemmo. 



C. 

Api'LiCATioxs Foil Licr:xsi:s Issued m Crrv Assessoii for 

Ykae 1892. 



BUSINESS. 




CLASS 1. 

Agencies or Companies, each— 
Acadeiuy of Music, Theatre or Opera 

House ^ 

Bagging Manufacturing Companies,! 

each..." I 1 

Banks, State or Savings, each i 12 

Breweries or Agencies of Brev/eries,! 

each ...J 3 

Building and Loan Associations,! 

each } 17 

Cotton Manufacturing Companies,! 

each j 1 

Express Companies or Agencies, each| i 

Electric Liglit Companies, each | i 

Oil Eefmeries. each j l 

Ferry (other than steam) Companies! 

or'x^gencies, each , I l 

Gas Cc>mpanie3, each ! i 

Insurance Companies or Agencies 

whose business is less than S^ 1,000... 31 
For each addition'l $1,000 or fractional 

part of §] ,000 of business, each@§10 ; 

14@$30 ; 10@.$40 ; lOf^ $50 ; 8f^?60 ; 

4@§70; 4(^'§S0; l(^t-$T00; 3^^110; 

1@>;150; l(a;S170: 1@§200; l(«)$580i 58 
Mercantile Agencies-- Dunn, Brad- 
street's and others I 3 

Phospliaie Rock Mining and Manu-I 

facturing Companies or Agencies, j 

each, also Fertilizer Companies ori 

Agencies, each 12 

Railroad Companies, each ! 3 

Bailroad Ticl^et Agencies, bieng all| 

persons buying or selling Railroad; 

Tickets, other than authorized! 

agents of Railroad Companies, each' 1 
Rent Agencies or Collectors of Rentsj 

or other claims, each.... j 7 

Steamships (regular lines) Agencies! 

or Companies, each 1 

Steam Ferry Boat Agencies or Com-! 

panics, each \ 1 

Steam Cotton Press, where one is lo-| 

cated and worked, each | 2 

Steam Cotton Press, where more than} 

one is located ar.d worked, each j 1 

Steamship (otlier than regular lines)! 

Companies or Agencies, each i 1 



200 

500 
250 

100 

25 

500 

500 

500 

50 

10 

500 

20 



150 



500 
500 



500 
25 
250 
100 
200 
300 
150 



Total. 



400 

500 

3,000 

300, 

I 

425 1 

I 
500! 
oOO! 
500 1 

1 

lOj 
500| 

620 ! 



I 
3,9301 

450 



0,000 
1,500 



500; 

175: 

I 

250j 
100 
400 

30o; 

i 
150! 21,000 00 



BWip.^g3y»y»! .iii»ya i W 



' 7 «* ^j T * yM ? t W' ! i'f^; ' y " ' f j ^ v ' "? 



0/^?/ yl.s.sY's.s'0/-',s' Rfport. 29 

Licenses Issued 1892. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



Sailiiig "Vessel Companies or Agen- 
cies, eich 

Street Railv/ay Companies, each 

Telephone CoDipanies or Agencies, 
each , 

Terminal Warehouse Companies or 
Agencies, each 

Waterworks Companies, each 

Oi], Creosote or Pemoline Companies, 
each 

Kerosene Oil Companies or Agencies, 
each .". 



© i Amount. 



CLASS 2. 

Auctioneers, Real Esiste Erokers, 
Brokers of Stocks, Bonds and other 
personal property, at auction or pri- 
vate sale, each 



CLASS 3. 

Artists, Ambrotypists, Daguerrean or 
Photographists, each 



CLASS 4. 
Architejcts, Civil Engineers or Sur^ 



CLASS 5. 

Brokers, Pawn, each ,... 

Brokers, Stock and other Personal 
Property and Eeal Estate, at pri- 
va,te sale, each 

Brokers, Ship 

Brokers, dealing in chemicals, fertili- 
zer materials, etc 



CLASS 6. 

Bankers, who are all persons or firms! 
other than banks, buying and sell-l 
ing domestic or foreign exchange,! 
or discounting notes" or other evi- 
dence of debt, each 



CLASS 7. 
rJilliard or Pool Tables, for each table! 



11 



50 
500 

500 

500 
100 

too 

500 



2.5 



300 



loO 



251 



Total 



100 
1,000 



I 

I 
500| 

Looo; 

100; 



100 



500. 3.300 00 



825 00 



150 00 



25 00 



300 



225 
150 

200 



875 00 



600 00 



50 00 



,..'* 



'l^?w?< ;{Wff r '*S!j^'a i j!^ ^ i'.'f«V Tf M' 'w ;^4ii»i»yjL;r-! f Wt>tfcw^,j.'* y ..j |"^ 



30 Mayor Fickcn^s Anaval Jlcvlew. 

• Licp:nsj:s Issued 1892. — Continued. 














BUSINESS. 


5" 


® 


Amount. 


Total. 


CLASS 8. 










• Boarding Houses or Hotels- 
Other than Sailor, having less than 

10 rooms, each 

Other than Sailor, having 20 and less 

than 50 rooms, each 


4 

1 

1 


10 

50 
100 


40 

50 

100 


5 


Those having over 100 rooms each 


190 00 


CLASS 9. 






Bakeries, Steam, each 


1 

24 


60 

25 


60 
600 




Bakeries, other than steam, each 


660 00 


CLASS 10. 










Barbers, for each chair 


G9 


2 50 




172 50 


CLASS 11. 




Bill-posters and distributors, each 


2 


40 




80 00 


CLASS 12. 










Butchers, for each stall 


24 


5 




120 OO 


CLASS 13. 




Builders, Master Mechanics & Work- 
men of all trades and employments 
not specially named elsewhere — 

Those employing not over 10 hands 
each , 


16 

6 


25 
10 


400 
60 




Kngravers each 


460 00 




CLASS 14. 






Cotton Presses worked by hand, each 


1 


35 




35 00 


CLASS 15. 










Circuses each ..-. 


1 


500 




600 00 


CLASS 16. 




Cook-shops, each 


11 


10 




110 00 


CLASS IS. 










Owners of Steam Tugs, for each Tug.. 


4 


25 




300 00 



v^mmm9r!^«sfm!TV' 



r??i^;i!fPP?*^f<?»^^ ■ 



City As.'^essurs Bcpori. 31 

Licenses Issued 1892. — Contixued. 



1 

• BUSINESS. 1 


Si 


® 


Amount 


Total. 


CLASS 19. 
Dye Houses, each 


1 

oo 
2 

22 

5 
1 

3 

1 
1 

8 
4 


$ 10 

100 
100 

100 

200 
300 

' 350 

400 
500 

50 
100 


2,200 
200 

2,200 

1.000 
300 

1,050 

400 
500 

400 
400 


$ 10 00 


CLASS 20. 

Dealers who are all persons, Firms or 
Companies, buying or selling any 
articles of trade or merchandise. 

Dealers in Fresh Meats (sold else- 
where than in the market,) or 
Green Grocer, on production of re- 
ceipt for one year's rent of stall in 
the market in advance, each 




Other dealers in Fresh Meats, sold 
el.5e\Yhere than in the market and 
not Green Grocers, and who are not 
required under the provisions of 
this Ordinance, to take out any 
other license .. . ... . 


2,400 00 


CLASS 21. 

Dealers in Upland Cotton, or Rice in 
tierces, or its equivalent in barrels. 

Those buying csr selling less than 5000 
packages, each !". 




Those buying or selling 5000 pack- 
ages and less than 8000 packages, 
each i 




Those buying or selling 8000 packages 
and less than 15,000 packages each.. 

Those buying or selling 15,000 pack- 
ages and less than 20,000 packagies, 
each 




Those l)uying or selling 20,000 pack- 
ages and less than 30,000 packages, 
each 




Those buying or selling 30,000 pack- 
ages or more each 


5,450 00 


CLASS 22. 

Dealers in Sea Island Cotton or Long 
_ Staple Cotton. 

TIjoso buying or selling less than 1000 
packages, each 




Those buying or selling 1000 packages 
and less than 2500 packages, each... 


800 00 



'J^^^!^'^^: 



jn^w,.^ ^ .. , ^»jf 9 ^ > fi !f nj i ^wni < ^^^^ 






Mayor Ficken's uinnual Rcviclv. 
Lici:nses Issued 1802. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 



CLASS 23. 

Cotton Pickeries or buyers and pack- 
ers of loose Cotton, eacb 



® 



Amourjt. 



Total 



CLASS 24. 
Dealers in Sewing Machines, each. 
CLASS 25. 



Importers and Dealers in Fertilizers, 
Cotton Seed ]Mea1, Kainit, Goano 
Phosphate Kock, jMarl, Lime, and 
all or ikwy other like articles used! 
or sold as Fertilizers, or whicii are! 
used for manufacturing Fertilizers.! 

Those selling not over 1000 tons, each 

CLASS m. 

Dealers in Lie u or, wholesale and re- 
tail. 

Retail Liquor or Bar-rooms, each 

Dealers whose sales do not exceed 



Bottlers of Beer and Ale, or agencies, 
each 



CLASS 27. 

Dealers in Books and Pictures, on 
streets, or canvassers for .same 



CLASS 28. 

Dealers in Horses and Mules, each 

CLASS 29. 

Dealers, whose stock never exceeds 
in value the sum of ^100, each 



CLASS 30. 

Dealers in Naval Stores. 

Those buying or selling not over 

15,000 packages, each 

Those buying or selling not over 

20,000 packages, each 



50 



50 



25S 


100 


12 


150 


2 


50 


4 


12 


7 


50 


17G 


5 


5 


100 


1 


150 



100 00 



100 00 




50 00 



48 00 



350 00 



880 00 



650 00 



rprir?:^-- ^ isf ^ ;pme^%' t ' ;SSK '^■ ' }. '^ ^vy ' ^ yTYW^-'^ ' 



City y\sscssvr''i> RcjiovL 
Licenses Issued J 892. — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 




Amount. 



:"i 



CLASS 31, 

Dealers in Fruits or Peanuts, v/itb 

stand on street, each.. 

Dealers in Hides and Tallow, Furs 

and Wool, each | 

Dealers in Ice, Oil, Coal, etc., from i 
carts or wagons on streets, for each; 
cart or wagon, exclusive of cart ii-i 

cense j 

Dealers in Ice, from branch Ice liousc,; 

each ! 

Dealers in Ice or Ice house, each | 

Dealers in Ice Cream or Ice Cream! 

Saloons j 

Dealers in Junk, retail, each i 

Dealers, peddiino- goods around thej 

city, per week, each ! 

Dealers in Sodn. Water sold from; 

founts, and milk shakes, each.. 
Dealers in Poultry. Fii-h, Vegetables^ 
or 1^'ruit on street, per month, each- 
Dealers in Poultry, Fish, Vegetables! 

or Fruit, in market, each .' | 

Dealers, retail, in second hand cloth- 
ing only 1 



10 



CLxVSS 32. 

Dealers in Coal or Coal Yards, and all 
importers of Coal, (except such as| 
is imported directly by oflicials ofj 
mechanical manufacturing or iu-l 
dustrial enterprises for use of such! 
establishments,) and all persons! 
selling Coal from wharves or ves-| 
sels, shall be deemed liable to aj 
Coal Yard license, each I 

Dealers, commercial brokers, who sell 
only on brokerage or on commis- 
sion here, each broker or recog- 
nized firm of brokers, not exceed- 
ing two members ■ I 



CLASS 33. 

Dealers in Poultry and Country Pro- 
duce, and in any and every other 
article of trade or merchandise, not 
specially named elsewhere in this 
OrdinaiKe, who.se .onuuai sales do ■ 
not exceed .^2,00U, each 301 



20 
50 

10 

10 

100| 

loj 

30! 

lo! 



50 



50 



15 



TOTA L 



80 
50 

50 

130 

300 

30 

90 

235 

150 

10 

50 

35 



200 



50 



1,210 00 



250 00 



4,515 4,515 00 



»iipi y ';ww»y» y ! ^»i Hy^ ^ 



34 



Mayor /nckcn's u-inaual lievlcw. 
Licenses Issued 1892. — Continued. 



:business. 


m 


@ 


Amount. 


Total. 


Whose annual sales are over $2,000 
and less thani^o 000 each 


128 
48 
19 
12 
16 
16 

26 

188 

1 
5 

1 

1 
9 

1 

4 
6 
1 
1 
3 
3 

1 

1 


$ 

25 

30 

40 
50 
60 
80 

5 

75 
150 

5 

50 
5( 
10 
15 
10 
15 
15 
15 

15 
15 


$ 

3,200 

1,440 
760 
600 
9G0 

1,280 

4,482 


$ 


Those whose anmial sales are over 
$5,000 and less than $10,000, each 

Those whose annual sales are over 
^10,000 and less than 815,000, each... 

Those whose annual sales are over 
$15,000 and less than $20,000, each... 

Tho5>e whose annual sales are over 
$20,000 and less than $30,000, each... 

Those whose annual sales are over 
$30,000 and less than $50,000, each... 

Those who.^e annual sales exceed 
$50,000, for each additional $1,000 
C«)$1.00; S>^^s90; 5(^:.$100: 1(5',S105 
2(r/)$110; 1@.$120; JC«$125; 3@S130 
ir^$132; 1@.$140; 1@,$150 ; 1©,$180 
1@$200; 1@$230; l(g;330 ; 1@S390 

2r^$o00 


12.722 00 






CLASS o4. 

Fairs, Promenade Concerts, Parties, 
Puhlic Balls, Glass Blovring. Operas. 
Minstrels, Panoramas, and every 
other kiiid of public entertainmeirt 
of a like nature, per day or night, 
each ; 


75 
300 

5 

5 
100 
50 
40 
90 
10 
15 
45 
45 

15 
15 


940 00 


CLASS 35. 

Founderies and Machine Shops 
whose gross business exceed $75,000 

Those whose gross business does not 
exceed $100,000 


375 00 


CLASS 36. 

Factories- 
Axle Grease factories, each 


Bucket and WiJ low-ware factories, 
each • 




Bag (other than paper) factories, each 
Barrel factories, each , ..... 




Cigar factories each 




Candy factories, each 




Cotton Tie liuckle factories, each 

Clothin"^ factories each 




Harness factories, each 




Mattress factories each 




Shirts and other underwear factories, 
eacl I 




Sausage (by steam) factories, each 


435 00 



f«3t«?rwS'*-''^'W 



^j;iy W g ff ! W # ^ l'4y!B V .«^''>: y-?'«:'>;^^ 



1G919'^7 



67'//; yl,S-.sr.s-,sv//'',S' HtjHJi'L 

Ltcenhes Issued 1892. — Continued. 



00 



BUSINESS. 




Amount I Total. 



Sash aDd Blind factories, each 

Soap and Candle factories, each 

Soda Water factories and bottlers of 
Soda Water, each 



CLASS 37. 
Gas Fitters and Plumbers, each. 

CLASS 39. 

Lau n d ries, s ( earn , each 

Laundries, washing and 
houses, each 



ironmsr-i 



CLASS 40. 
Lumber yards, lumber ponds, each... 

CLASS 41.. 

Lawyers, Physicians, Dentists, Chem- 
ists- 
Lawyers, wiiose gross business does 
not exceed $600, each 20 

Lawyers, whose gross business does 
not exceed 81,000, each j 17 

Lawyers, whose gross business does 
not exceed $3,000, each 13 

Physicians, w^hose gross business does 
not exceed !?600, each 

Physicians, whose gross business does 
not exceed Sl.OoO, each 10 

Physicians, whose gross business does 
not exceed S3,000, each 

Physicians, whose gross business ex- 
ceeds $5,000, each 1 

Dentists, whose gross business does 
not exceed $600, each 

Dentists, whose gross business does 
not exceed $1,000, each : 

Dentists, whose gross business does 
not exceed $3,000, each 

C^hemists. whose gross business ex- 
ceeds $5,000, each ; l 

Veterinery Surgeons, each , l 



CLASS 42. 
>Larble Yards, each 



CLASS 43. 
>Hlls, Flour, each 



10 

2o 

50 

10 

25 

50 

75 

10 

25 

50 

100 
20 

20 



120 $ 
15 

100 



100 

200 



200 
425 
650 
220 
250 
200 
75 
30 
100 
100 

100 

20 



50i 



50 



235 00 



i 175 00 



300 00 



60 00 



2,370 00 



80 00 



50 00 



r< 



yw i u w nay !' 



yyy,j s y y ».j ^ .. t .^;q>r?7Tp-^ry?^ ^ 



36 



Mayor FicJccn's Annual Rcvieiv. 
Licenses Issued 1892. — Contikced. 



BUSINESS. Si 

t 


© 


Amount. 


Total. 


Mills, Grist, stenm, each 

Mills, Grist, horse power, each \ 

Mills, planiijg, each 

Mills, saw, each ! 

Mills, Rice, those doing- a business of! 

10,000 tierces and under, each i 

Mills, spice or coffee, sea foam, self-' 

raising or prepared flours, as special! 

business, each 

CLASS 44. 

Papers, daily, v/orked by steam, gas, 

or water power, each 

Papers, worked bv liand. each 


4 
2 

3 

91 

"i 

3! 
i 

! 

3 

7 

9 
4 
3 

y 

7 
1 

1 
1 


30 
10 

50 
50 

250 
20 

150 
25 

50 

30 

25 

30 

50 

50 
5 

25 
50 


$ m\ 

.20 
150 
100 

750 
20 

150 
25 

150 

150 
45 


1,1C0 00 


Printing Offices, job, steam, gas, or 
water power, each 


325 00 


CLASS 45. 
Restaurants, each 


- 
210 00 


CLASS 46. 
Shooting galleries, skating rinks, each 

CLASS 47. 
Stables, pubhc or liverj^, each... 


50 00 
120 00 


CLASS 48. 
Stevedores, each ; 


150 00 


CLASS 49- 
Tailors, merchant, each 


195 00 


Tailor shops, not merchant 






CLASS 50. 

Undertakers, whose business does not 
exceed $1,000 


• 175 
50 




Undertakers, whose business does not 
exceed ^2,000, each 


225 00 


CLASS 51. 

Vehicles, carts, used for business pur- 
poses, (including farm and phos- 
phrle carts,) trucks, ox wagojs, 
drays, hacks. 





ti^i'm^siiWii^'mFP*^ 



?ig^. ^*w^^- Vjg'tywi)^^ '»' ; W ' W^:^?^^'' 



Licenses Issukd' 1892. — Continued. 



37 



BUSINESS. 



DraTV'n b3^ one horse, each | 

Drawn by tv/o horses, each | 

Coaches, oiniiibusses, drawn by twoj 

horses, each I 

Bugs;ies and carriages, drawn by one! 

horse, each i 

Buggies and carriages, drawn by two 

horse43, each 



CLASS 58. 

Ware7}iousemen and v/harf-men who 
are all persons, niTiis or companies,! 
receiving any article of trade or] 
merchandise on storage, either on! 
wharves, wharf, Vvarehouses, biiild-l 
ings, or fctores, in any part of thej 
cit3% or who have piers or wharvesj 
used for landing or shipping of 
goodo from vessels. 

Whose gross receipts do not exceed 
$5,000, each 

Whose gross receipts do not exceed 

?10,000, each. 



CLASS 54. 

Wliee] Wright and Blacksmith shops, 

Wheelwright, one forge, each 

Wheelwright shops, for each addi- 
tional forge 

Blacksmith shops, one forge, each 

Blacksmith shops, for each additional 
forge 

Coach, Carriage and Buggy makers, 
and repairers 



CLASS 55. 

Wood Yards (all parties having paid 
for wood yard licenses and licenses 
for carts, shall have the privilege ofj 
oflering wood for sale on the streets i 
Nviihout the addition of a huckster's 
license, provided, however, the 
names of the owners of such carts 
be painted thereon,) each 



Specials— 
yi>t?iLclassitled and Special Licenses. 



@ 



Amount. 



Total. 



1005 
55 


10 
20 


G 


30 


3 


10 


IS 


20 


1 


75 


a 


100 


3 


10 


2 
18 


5 
10 


2 


5 


2 


25 


17 


1 
30 


26 





$ 10,050 
LIOOJ 

180 

30 

360 



lb 

300 

30 

10 
180 

10 

50 



11,720 00 



375 00 



280 00 



510 00 

288 00 



?107,175 50 



VvM. AIKEN KICLLY, 
^■iiarleston, S. C, December 31st, 1892. City Asses.^or. 



^j ^^wy^' »; yj ji fffrw^| ^ ^ 



Nffj ^ y.iH. ' V ■ ■ 



'1 



t^S 



Mayor Ficl'Ctifi Amval llnnnv. 



D. 

Assessed Hetujjns fot: Licenses turned ovef. to Citv 

TliEASi:KER FOK YeAR 1S92. ' 



BUSINESS. 



CLASS 1. 

Insurance Companies or Agencies 
whose business is less than ^1,000[ 
each 

Raih'oad Ticket Agencies, being alli 
persons buying or fi^elling Raiiroad! 
Tickets otlier than authorizedj 
Agents of Raih-oad Companies, 
each 

Steam Cotton Press, where one is lo- 
cated and worked, each 

Telegraph companies or agencies each, 
for business done exclusively 
within tlie City of Charleston , and 
not including any business done to 
or from points without the State, 
and not including any business 
done for the Government of thei 
United States, its oflticers or agents! 

Kerosene Oil Companies or Agencies,! 
each 



CLASS 2. 

Auctioneers, real estate brokers, brok- 
ers of stocks, bonds and other per- 
sonal property at auction or pri- 
vate sale, each 



CLASS 4. 

Architects, civil engineers or survey • 
ors, each 



CLASS o. 

Brokers, stock and other personal 
property and real estate at private 
sale, each 

Brokers, street 



CLASS 8. 
Boarding Houses, sailor, each. 

CLASS 10. 
Barbers, for each chair 



© 



20 



500 



200 



Amount. Total. 



500 



500 



50 



50 



20 



500 
200 



1,000 

i 
500 



,220 



50 



125 



60 



2 50 



t 



'f'lul 



Cifij AsHCHHor^ Pifpoti. 39 

Assessed Uetuuxs eoij Licenses for 1.892 — C(jNTi.NrEi). 



BUSINESS. 


11 


® 


Amount. 


Total. 


CLASS 12. . 








Butcliers, for each stall 


11 


5 




55 


CLASS 13. 




]\Iaster mechanics, those enaploying 
not over ten hPvnds, each 


4 


25 




100 


CLASS 16. 


• 


Cook shops, e.ich 


6 


10 




60 


CLASS 20. 










Dealers in fresh meats (sold elsewhere 
than in the market,) or green 
grocer on production of receipt 
tor one year's rent of stall in the 
market in advance, each ..... 


4 


100 




400 


CLASS 24. 










Dealers in sewing machines, each. 


1 


50 




50 


CLASS 26. 










Retail liquor or bar-rooms, each 


4 


100 




400 


CLASS 2S. 










Dealers in horses and mules, each 


3 


50 




150 


CLASS 29. 










Dealers, whose stock never exceeds in 
value the sum of $100, each 


S 


5 




15 


CLASS 31. 










Dealers in ice, from branch ice house, 
each 


6 
1 

1 


TO 

100 

30 


60 

100 

30 




IX^aiers in ice or ice house, each 

i^ealers in junk, retail, each 






190 


CLASS 32. 




Healers in coal or coal yards, and all 
iniportei^ of coal (ex cent such as 
iH imported dir-cctly by ofTicials 
of laeehanical manufacturing or 











y.g^aj?;P^;g^P?S?«?^f;^^ ^ 



"40 Mayor Flclxn^s Annual l!evicw. 

Assessed Ketuens for Licenses for 189:2 — Continued. 



BUSINESS. 


if 


® 


Amount. 


Total. ' 


industrial enterprises for use of 
such establishments.) and all per- 
sons selling coal from wharves or 
vessels shall be deemed liable to 
a coal yard license, each 


1 

11 

7 
«> 

1 
1 
2 

2 

9 
1 

o 

-J 

3 
2 
1 


50 
50 

15 

25 

50 
15 
15 

25 

10 
10 
10 

15 
10 
10 


50 
550 




Dealers, commercial brokers, v/ho sell 
only on brokerage or on commis- 
sion here, each broker or recog- 
nized firm cf brokers, not exceed- 
ing two members 






600 


CLASS 33. 

Dealers, whose annual sales do not 
exceed s^2 000 each 


105 
50 

50 
15 

SO 

- 

90 
10 
20 


Whose annual sales are over ^2,000 
and less than ^,-5 000 each 




CLASS 36. 
Barrel factories each 


155 
2 


Harness factories, each 




Mattress factories, each... 

CLASS 37 
Gasfltters and plumbers, each 


95 


CLASS 41. 

Lawyers, Physicians, Dentists, Chem- 

ist-s: 
Lawyers whose ^ross business does 

not exceed ^GOO, each 

Physicians whose gross business does 

not exceed Sf)0(> each 


50 


Dentists, whose gross business does 
not exceed .S600 each 




CLASS 44. 
Printing offices job hand, each... 


120 
45 


CLASS 51. 

Vehicles, carts, etc., drawn by one 
horse each 


20 
10 


CLASS 54. 
Wheelwright, one forgo, each 



jy^^aiwaww^g mm-'^-,^^/ " -^ 



City Assessor's Iicpori. ' 41 

Asskss?:d Ektuhns fok Lioknsks fou 1892 — Con'J'inukd. 





BUSINESS. 


1^ 

Bo 


(§ 


AmouDt. 


Total. 



CLASS 55. 



Wood yards. 



Total Assessed Licenses 

Penalty 50 per cent 

Total Assessed Licenses and Penal 
ties 



30 



GO 

5,097 50 
2,548 75 

7,646 25 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Oiiy Assessor. 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1892. 



H^!5«?r«?^???'*P'^!!^^ 



ifforrr 



42 ]\fayor Ficl-cn^^^ Ammal llcvlew. | 

E. % 



STATE:srENT OF THE Nu:MBER OF PeRMITS IsSUED FOli NeW 

Buildings, and Old Buildings Improved, for the 
Year 1892. 



Permits- 
Ward 1. 
Ward 2.. 


NEW 

-Reported Cost, i; 

1 Pe 

6 


BUILl 

^;309,050. 
rmit. 

a 
a 


:)INGS. 

Distributed in 

Reported Cost 
it *( 


Ward 3.. 


,,. i 


<{ <. 


Ward 4. 
Ward 5.. 
Ward G.. 
Ward 7.. 


8 

2 

11 

G 




Ward S. 
Ward 9. 


21 

12 


U li 


Ward 10. 
Ward 11. 
Ward 12. 


32 

21 

42 


U (C 

(( (( 



300 



40,300 

21,800 

11,700 

' 10,900 

" 20,950 



Total 169 Permits. Reported Cost ?309,050 



Total Permits 169 " " ..^309,050 



.% 20,000 \ 

. 20,100 I 

. 80,750 I 

. 24.300 \ 



30,400 I 

27,550 5 



Classified as follows : I 

I 

Store, granite and brick 1 Reported Co3t..$ 7,500 5 



Stores and Dwellings combined, wood 4 *' " .. 9,500 | 

Lumber Factory and Kiln 1 " '* .. 10,000 | 

Extension of East Shore Terminal Kail- | 

road and Improvement's 1 '• '* .. 50,000 | 

New Wharf and Improvements of North | 

Eastern Railroad 1 " ' " .. 10,000 I 

Brewery, brick 1 " " .. 40,000 j 

Dentist's Laboratory and Dwelling coin- | 

bined, iron and wood 1 " " .. 5,000 | 

Bakery, wood 1 " " .. 500 | 

Work-shop, wood 1 . " *' .. 250 \ 

Dwellings, brick 2 " " .. 23,500 | 

Dwellings, wood 155 " " .. 152,800 . | 



r W «M j' r..« w ^.-'.r :>a < W^y t gt ' ^^-;^.',?^ 



, City y{.^.sr.9.sY/r'/? He port . 4.j 

OLD BUILDINGS HSIPllOVED. 
\oi i'oiiii.u:5--Kepui'ted Cost, $115,850. Distributed in City us follows: 



Ward 1 ..., 8 Permits. 

Ward 2 7 

Ward 3 14 

Ward 4 12 

WVrd 5 17 

Ward 6 15 

AVard 7 8 

Ward 8 4 

Ward 9 8 

AVardlO. 7 

Ward 11 23 

Ward 12 14 



Reported Cost $ 11,600 

'• n,210 

" 14,000 

" 11,350 

" 18,800 

" .' 10,500 

" 24,130 

*' " 750 

•' 1,G50 

'' 1,750 

" •.. 6,310 

" 8,800 



Total 137 Permits, lleported Cost $115,850 

Total of New Buildings and Iniprovenients-— 

New Buildings..... ....169 Permits. Reported Cost..?309,050 

Old Buildings Improved 137 " " " .. 115,850 



Total.......... 306 Permits, Reported Cost..$424,900 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

(.■harleston, S. C, December 3Jst, 1892. City Assessor. 



ffg8; ^ '! iyfey*f 3»^ ^:»y»t ' «^^ . ''' ' ^!\"J ' '-- f 



^^ 



44 



Mayor Fkhcii'n Annual lloyiew. 
F. 



COMPAKJSON OF ASSESSMENTS WITH SaLES OF KeAL EsTATE 

FOK Year 1892. 



WARDS. 


^ j; Amount op 
^'P^\ Sales. 


Amount of Advance 

Assessments Assessments 


4-i 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 


19 ! ^ 94.335 

35 1 106.000 
16 31^960 
30 ' 123,030 
23 93,180 

36 93,605 
22 106,870 

98 44 TAr, 


!? 64,750 
57,075 
24,600 
67,525 
59,950 
54.600 
65,600 
28,600 
11,000 
27,015 
48,615 
25,955 


% 29,585 
48,925 
7,360 
60,505 
33,230 
39 005 


45.69 
85.72 
29.92 
89 60 


Ward 5 


55 43 


Ward 6 


71 44 


Ward 7 


41 '270 62.91 


Ward S..... 


15'945 55.75 

6,605 60.05 

12 555 46.47 


Ward 9 


12 

68 

43 

147 

479 


17,605 

39,570 
67,030 
53,660 


Ward 10 


Ward 11 


18',415 37.88 
27 705 106.74 


W^ard 12 






Totals 


$876,390 


$535,285 


$341,105 


63.72 



471 Pieces sold above assessments $342,005 



Anion lit of Fiales 

Amount of Assessments. 



r.868,075 
526,070 



Per cent, of Sales over Assessments 
8 Pieces sold below Assessments 



65.01 



$900 00 



Amount of Assessments $9,215 

Amount of Sales 8,315 



Per cent, of Sales below Assessments. 



09.7; 



WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1892. City Assessor. 



>g My^,yy .f ffl^i;'jLt>< ;ii! W T ,W^w^^ ^ W. ' j*^^"' >» » * i\ iv > i«>^i, ' 



-rr- — 1' | .ip- , - » . t* - . «w iWM * H *i^' 



1 



City Assei>sor^s liepori. 



45 



G. — Kates of Assessments and Taxation F05t the Ykaks 



1870 TO 1892, Inclusive. 



Year. 



Assessments. 



1870{jpe?sonai; 
J.O^ J- li Personal, 



S 22,93.5,5^9 00 
9,195,828 00' 



S lS,e52,5.S.5 00 
8,895.575 00 



Total 
A.ssessment. 



Rate 

Corporation 

Tax. 



Rate 

School 

Tax. 



'S 18/j2:-!,3"5 00 



LOi ^\ iPereoual { 9,292,091 00 

3_g73f!Real 



32.131,477 00j2 per cent. 
27,518,160 00j2 per cent. 



Personal 



iS lS.974,72f) 00 
i 9,004.271 00 



!S 28,215,306 00,2 per cent. 



-lQ7i/jReal ....'S 18122,810 001 
J^o/ 'i 1 1 Personal \ 8,.m524 00; 



1 Q7-, i :Real 

XOit^^ I Personal. 



S 27,978,991 00 



iffTo per cent. 



1876] 



iReal 

(Personal. 



— !.? 26,661,634 00 2>i> per cent. 
S 18,216,061 00: 
8,! 41.172 001 

! !g 26,357.2:36 00,23^ per cent. 

■S 18 S-OS.^SO 00; 

i 9,co*j,99o 00 ; 

j !s 27',80e,470 0.0,2 per cent. 



... S 18.669,623 00; 



1.0i i \ persoual i 7,922,155 00; 

I I — -. !■? 26,591,778 00'2M per cent. 

iReal Is 18.313.4.50 00. i 

8,008,403 00 i I 



1 Q7Q f 'Real iS 

J.0/O|jpersonal I 



Real 

Personal. 



ib/Jj Personal. 

1880 { 
1881 1 
18821 



;S 17,137,2>5 CO 

.[ 6,272,457 00; 

.;$ 15,017,595 00 

.1 6,5.55; SG-1 00 ! 



is 26,321,a>3 00j2^ per cent. 
jS 23,409,712 00i2 per cent. 



Real 'S 15,1,S2 845 OOJ 

Personal 



21,573,4.59 00:23^ per cent. 



Real 

Personal. 



7,244,2)2 00' 

~:$ 22,427,057 00|2i4 per cent. 



iS 15.S20,8,>5 OOi 
1 7,925,082 001 



1 RQQ J iRPfil !S 15,a54.,575 00 

lOOO^ IPersonal I 7,419,7.84 00 



eal 

Personal. 



-jOQ- ( Real 



1884{jPS 
1885 {b 
1886] I?- 

1887 ]I?S 



Real 

Personal. 



-*-^^M IPersonal. 



16,2t6,8li5 00 1 
8,186,2; 6 OOi 



S 23,245,967 OOJ214 per cent. 

I 
S 23,274,,3,59 0012% per cent. 



$ 16,75;3,760 00 
8,1.38 15:3 00 



jS 24,4.33,081 00 



S 16.933,.565 00 
7,809,212 00 



rsonal. 



.lOOy|!pgrsonal 



1390 1 'Real 



Personal 



1891 {|f 

( ; 1 ei M 



Real 

ersonal. 



S 14,221 290 00 
7,290,912 00 



5 14, .527,^50 00 1 
7,OJ2,205 00 



S 14,726.-565 00 
6,699;087 00' 



$ 14„800,0<>1 00. 
6,.586,.>3y 00' 



S 24,891,913 00 

S 2-4,742,777 00 

S 21,512,202 00 

j$ 21,569,5.>> 00 

$ 21,425,652 00 



2 per cent. 
2 percent. 
I'M per cent. 
2 per cent. 
23>^ mills. 
23 mills. 



14.878,130 00; 
6,.554.601 OOi 



S 21,386,5,39 00|23 mills. 



S lt,9'^0.926 ft), 



S 21,4:33,031 00 22 mills. 



21,9.87,122 00 22 mil 



134 mills. 
1>(; mills. 
Hi mills. 
13^ mills. 
IJ^niills. 
13^ mills. 
1 mill. 
IM mills. 
13,^ mills. 
134 mills. 
13^ mills. 
13^ mills. 
Imill. 
1^4 mills. 
13,^ mills. 
134 mills. 
13^ mills. 
134 mills. 
]% mills. 
13.^ mills. 
Um mills. 



WM. AIKEN KELLY- CUy Asseasor. 
Charleston , S. C., Dcceiubor 31st, 1802. 



^yS^^M , ^ ,t ^ iifW^.^^ ^ -ViJ ? t>J5 ^^ 



1 



AG 



jMaijor ./'Vc/jc/i'.s Anttn.al licvtctu. 



JI. 

Jil^XAPlTULATlOX OF TaX KeTUKNS CiTY OF (JiiAKLE.STON, S. C.j 
FOB YpiAK 1860. 



No. 



DJ^SCPvIPTION OF 
Pkope RTY Kk'J'UBNED. 



I A^rouNT 
iRetukned 



Rai'j: 

OF 

Tax. 



15,947 

2G7 

4! 39 

25 



817,748 
8.40 



1,292 
843 



Keal Estate j ;<25, 972,240 

Stock of Goods 4,0S3,8if) 

Interest on Bonds, &c 

Dividends 

Slaves 

Carriages drawn }>y tv/o horses 
Carriages drawn by one horse 

Sulkeys and Cliairs 

Gross Income 

Commissions 

An Dili tics I 

Premiums of Insurance | 

Ca])ital Stock of all Gas Light 

Companies 

jCapitol in Shipping 

Gross Receipts of ail Conjmer- 

I cial Agencies 

jHorses and Mules 

JDogs 



544,404 

778,736 

6.055 

401,920 

755,700 
572,360 

1,963 



1.40 % 
1.40 •• 
2.50 •• 
2..^0 •• 
? 3 each 
30 •• 
20 •• 
15 •• 
2.50 % 
2.50 •• 
2.50 •• 
1.25 •• 

.50 •• 
.75 •• 

2.50 •• 
$10 each 



Amount 

OP 

Tax. 

$363,011 36 

65,573 42 

7,943 70 

210 08 

47,841 00 

8,010 00 

8,780 00 

375 00 

13,610 10 

19,408 40 

151 38 

5,024 00 

3,778 50 
4,292 70 

49 08 

12,920 0() 

1,686 00 



Total amount of Tax for year 1860. 



.S563,324 72 



No. of White Tax Returns 4,642. Amount of Tax $551,112 51 

No. of Coloi'ed Tax Returns 371. Amount of Tax 12,212 21 



Total Tax Returns for 1860.-5,013. Total Tax, 



^563,324 72 



Amount of Real Estate— \yhite Returns $25,213,370 

Amount of Real Estate- -Colored Returns 758,870 



Total Assessments of Real Estate §25,972,240 



No. of Slaves returned by White Tax x>ayers 15.557 

No. of Slaves returned by 132 Colored Tax-payers 390 



Total number of Slaves returned 15,947 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Charleston, S, C, December 31, 1892. Ctfj Assessor. 



All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WM. AIKEN KELLY, 

Czty Assessor. 



!«(5I!WW«!»<W«^'»«"'^ 



Report of City ShcriJJ. 



il 



REPORT OF CITY SIIEIiJFF. 



Office of City Sheriff, ) 

Charleston, S. C, February, 1st, 1893. [ 

To the Ilonorable the Mayor and AldcTDien of tlie City of 
Charleston. : 

Gentlemen : I respectfully submit the following report 
of the business of this Office, for the year ending December 
31st, 1892. Very respectfully, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, 

City Sheriff. 



Taxes collected by the City Sheriff during the year 1892: 
COLLECTIONS IN MONTHS. 



January— Tax— year 18S7., 
18S8. 



Febr 



uary 



^La^cb & \ 
April / 



May, June \ 
July / 



]7 20 



06 OZ 



1SS9 147 13 

1890 1,011 99 

1891 1,952 45 $3,182 29 



1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 



§ 36 56 

38 25 

28 37 

9 20 

148 23 

427 21 

823 07 

1891... ;965 64 

1887 $ 60 00 

1888 121 93 

1889 296 62 

1890 328 02 

1891 763 79 



188S ^ 5 00 

1889 268 45 

1890 961 38 

1891 1,124 33 



2,476 53 



1,570 36 



2,359 16 






48 Mayor Ficken'i; An'aa.al Reolew 

A.ug„ Sc 



^"^'^^^•}- •• 1886 $ 10166 



1887 31 30 

1888 16 11. 

1889 187 93 

1890 676 79 

1891 928 95 1,942 74 

Nov.&Dee. •• •• 1887 $ 224 80 . | 

1888 362 73 .^ 

1889.. 777 75 I 

1890 802 46 | 

1891..... 2,318 60 J 

1892 3,309 39 7,795 73 I 

^19,326 81 I 

SCnOOI. TAX COLLECTED. j| 

January $233 67 4 

February 165 95 4 

March and April :. 103 75 k 

May, June and July 128 40 | 

August, September and October 104 50 J 

November and December .423 16 1,159 49 ^ 

Amount collected in this Office for Licenses 1,468 00 i 

i 

Total $21,954 30 | 

EECAPITULATION. | 

Taxes--1882— Collected in 1892 § 30 56 , | 

1883 •• •• 38 25 I 

1884 •• •• 28 37 I 

•• . 18S6 •• •• 101 66 '^ 

1887 •• •• 342 50 

1888 •• " 707 52 

1889 •' •• 2,105 09 

1890 •• •• 4,603 71 

1891 •• " 8,053 76 

1892 " •• 3,309 39 

School Tax Collected \ 1,159 49 

License " - 1,468 00 21,954 30 

Respectfully submitted, 

GLENN E. DAVIS, 

C'dy Sheriff. 



yj^ »w i>^ 'w< y 'fflif fc" r.'i4;;^ ^ j!«-t» ^ ' ' ^ 



Report of the Corporation Counsel. 49 \ 



REPORT OF THE CORPORATION COUNSEL FOR THE YEAR ] 

ENDING DEC, 31, 1892. i 

To the Honor able the Mayor and Alderraera of the ^ City of ■■ 

Charleston. ■. 

Gentlemen— I respectfully submit my report as Corpora- \ 

lion Counsel for the year ending December 31, 1892. I 

The Sheriff having been directed to proceed against de- I 

linquent taxpayers on the tax executions issued by the ': 

City Treasurer, no cases for the collection of taxes were ' 
turned over to me for suit. . \ 

The pending case against Mrs. Doris \yerner in the Com- ^• 

mon Pleas for the collection of $1,157.10, (the cost of filling ■ 

her low lot in the centre of the square bounded by Rutledge, - 

Calhoun, Smith and Bull streets,) was called for trial on ] 

Circuit, v/hereupon the defendant interposed an oral de- ■ 
murrer. After argument the demurrer w^as over-ruled ; 

from this decision of the Court Mrs. Werner appealed to the ; 

Supreme Court, where the question has been argued and is J 

now awaiting decision. [ 

At the request of the Mayor and Aldermen, I have pre- f 

pared the following Ordinances which have become laws : j 

1. A Bill to strike out Section 124 of the General Ordinances 1882, • 
and insert a new Section in lieu thereof. [ 

2. A Bill to organize the system of medical attendance upon the 'i 
poor of the City of Charleston and to alter and amend Chapter VI of ^ 
the Kevised Ordinances entitled "Health Department" by repeal- j 
ing all Ordinances heretofore parsed amending Sections 214, 215, 210, 

217, 218 and 219, by repealing said Sections and by inserting new ^ 

Sections in lieu thereof. j 

3. A Bill to strike out Sections 176, 176, J77 and 180 of the General •' 
Ordinances and to insert new Sections in lieu thereof. . 

4. A Bill to create a Board for the management, custody and care 
of convicts sentenced to hard labor on the public streets, squares. 

alleys and lanes of the City of Charleston for violations of City Ordi- . 

nances, or for other offenses. !; 

o. A Resolution to give the right of way on the streets, to the am- , 

bulances of the City Hospital. : 

4 : 



"■' ■■ ^■'■" ■■■■■■ ■ -^'^ I 



50 IJayor Fich'n\'< Aniioat hculcw. i 

I 

6. A Bill to provide for the if.siiiug of Coupon Bonds, with interest 1 

iii ILe rate of iivc per eeiituui per annum for the purpose of taking \ 

up or exchangiDg the seven per cent, coupon bonds maturing in | 

1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 189G and 1897. | 

7. A Bill to amend Section 377 of the General Ordinances. | 

Seven titles have been examined and nine title deeds to | 

the City have been prepared for execution. Two other \ 

deeds have been prepared in re. East Shore Terminal Cora- ' ^ 

pany and Concord Street, which have not yet been executed. | 

I have given seventy-five written opinions upon questions | 

submitted io me by the ]\Iayor and Aldermen., by the vari- J 

ous departments of the City Government and by Committee ^ 

of Council. J 

The following contracts were prepared in duplicate: ■ | 

1. With the Charleston Gas Light Company. ' | 

2. With the Charlestcn Light and Povvcr Company. I 
P>. With the jSredical College of the State of South Carolina. | 

4. V7ith the Charleston Medical School, | 

5. With T. Campbell for repairing the heating apparatus at City | 
Hall. ' 5 

G, With O. O. Campbell and the Harbor Commissioners for remov- | 

iug the sunken dredge ofi^ Southern Wharf. 3 



At the request of the Mayor and of Committees of Coun- 
cil, I have prepared, 

1. Form of option to buy kind. 

2. Form of Five per cent. Bonds to take up maturing Seven per 
cent. Bonds. 

3. Form of Resolutions to be adopted by Council appointing a 
Deputy City Treasurer during the illness of City Treasurer W. L_ 
Campbell. 

4. Form of the Bond, of J. O. Lee, Deputy City Treasurer to City 
Treasurer W, L. Campbell, and assignment of same to City Council. 

5. Resolutions to be adopted by Board of Harbor Commissioners 
in re, sunken dredge off Southern Wharf. 

6. Resolutions of City Council in re. R. R. Avenue on western 
side of the city. 

7. Resolutions of City Council in re. right of way in said avenue to 
National Land Improvement and Manufacturing Company. 

8. Resolutious of City Council ?>?- 7-e. track of the South Carolina 
Railway Company through Mary Street. 

9. Resolutions of City Council requiring the North-Eastern Rail 
Road Company to hiive a tiagmau in Pringle Street. 



••--^«!«<gp«f«1^SS<p?W!?f^^ "T.rr'^'^-i'-l^'"-""' 



Report of ihc Coiporatlon Counsel. 51 

JO. Eeport and Resolutions to be submitted to City Council by the 
Comniiitee on Port and Harbor Improvemcnty, upon which to 
obtain from Council, a loan to the Board of Harbor Commissioners of 
tlie amount necessary to pay for the removal of the sunken dredj^e I 

off Southern Wharf. \ 

By instruction of the Mayor and Aldermen, I p]:epared ■ 

and sent to Senator Smythe the following Bills to be intro- _ ■ 

duced into the Legislature, The first, with some amendments \ 

became a law, the otliers, did not become laws: . ' 

1. A Bill to amend an Act entitled -'An Act to utilize the labor of \ 
Jail and Municipal convicts and to empower the Courts and Muni- \ 
cipal authorities to impose the punishment within their respective v 
jurisdictions," approved Dec. 22, 1SS5. \ 

2. Joint Resolutions in re. Amendment to the Constitution on the 

subject of Municipal Courts, '^ 

3. A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act relative to the power • 
of the City Council of Charleston to impose punishment for the vio- ; 
latlons of City Ordinances," approved March 1, 1870. \ 

Suits in Equity were instituted in the United States Court :" 

and temporary injunctions obtained, restraining the coUec- | 

tion of the license tax, by the Western Union Telegraph | 

Company and the Postal Cable Telegraph Company. These \ 

cases are still pending. .- 

Similar proceedings have likewise been taken in the ] 

State Court by H. H. Kasprowicz, a cut rate railroad ticket | 

seller, and by the Tide Water Oil Company. i 

The Telegraph Companies claim exemption from the pay- ^ 

ment of the license tax to the City, upon the grounds, | 

1st. That being goverument<al agencies they cannot be made to • 

pay a license tax, as a condition precedent to doing business. | 

2 [id. That it is ultra vires to tax the business of a telegraph com- • | 

pany. ] 

The other cases claim that their business is inter-state } 

commerce and therefore cannot be taxed either by a State ' 

or a Municipality. The cases are awaiting trial. { 

Respectfully submitted. I 

CHARLES INGLESBY, 

Corporatio7i Counsel. 



P.^J?l^ -' P?'^ ' i?t^ ? y:?^- ' '5 'f ^ "^ 



52 Mayor FickefCn Annval Bevkw. 



General repairs, labor..... $ 3,202 07 



THE STREET DEPAimiENT. \ 

■ I 

Office of Supekintendent of Streets, I | 

Charleston, S. C, December Slst, 1892. j | 

7b //<;r 3Iayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston, | 

Gentlemen : I beg leave to submit for your consideration 

my annual report for the year 1892. 



I 

I 

BECEIPTS. A 



General appropriation ..$55,000 00 1 

Extra appropriation 2,365 25 .] 

2-miIl betterment tax 40,782 62 • r 

From ail other sources 3,258 57 1 

Total receipts ^101,406 44 

■i 
Expenditures during the year accounted for as follows. -I 

SCAVENGEK BEPAKTMENT. | 

Miscellaneous % 4,054 79 1 

Forage 4,196 34 , 

Jlopairs 1,C95 50 % 

Labor 12,337 33 I 

$22,283 96 j 

Expense account, salaries, printing. &c 1,90115 j 

^'^ , i 

General repairs, material 350 88 | 

$ 3,552 95 i 

General Police, labor $10,719 95 3 

General Police, material 196 99 j 

$10,916 94 . i 

Hardware ...% 828 85 

Lime and cement 715 14 

Bricks 280 95 

Brick pavements, labor _. 467 00 

Brick drains 106 75 

Stone flag 14,353 10 

Stone curb • 3,528 45 

Stone granite blocks 10,610 80 

Flag pavement, labor 10,257 44 



Amounts forward §79,803 48 ?101,408 44 



inyg f y,?;wv^ ji y^i»W ' ^W^ !' y.".gr '' ^T/yV^*^^ ■ » u". > 



The Stred Dcpartincni. 

Stone granite blocks, hauling- and UiUyiug 

Onrb ft*/'^ '^r(^'!.H\ii<r stono, labor.. 

Roadways, grtuute blocks, repairs, labor 

Roadways, cobble, repairs, labor 

Plank roads, repairs, labor 

Wooden curbs and crossings, repairs, labor 

Lumber 

Pipe drain, labor.. , $ 3,190 70 

Pipe drain, material 3,222 72 

Earth, shell and gravel, material 1,100 00 

Earth, shell and gravel, labor 8 00 

Meeting street shell road, labor 

Extension Rutledge street 

Ilepairs, Mary street 

Market street concrete wall 

Extension Ashley street 

Barricade Calhoun street 

Roadway, pyrites, labor.... 

Roadway, pyrites, material 

Spring street shell road 

Stone roadway, Line street, labor.... 

Stone roadv.'ay, Chapel street, labor... 

Stone roadway, Spring street, labor 

Stone roadway. King street, labor 

Stone roadway, fV.rchdaIe street, labor 

Stone roadway, ('hurch street, labor 

Stone roadway, Vendue Range, labor..... 

Cobble roadway, Southern Wharf, labor 

Balance charged back to Treasurer 

Total 



The extra appropriation of $2,365 25 mentioned in the 
list of receipts, v/as niade to cover expenses incurred by the 
Street Department in doing extra work during the summer 
months, at the request of the Board of Health. This amount 
was expended out of the regular appropriation, and was 
simply returned by order of Council. 

NEW STREETS. 

During the year Ladson Court was opened from its west 
^nd to King Street, the new part is much wider than the 



53 


$ 020 43 


88 GO 


1,1G1 08 


1,291 42 


614 G3 


422 55 


2,900 51 


$ 6,413 42 

1 • 


) 

- ? I.IOS 00 


407 85 


103 GO 


200 85 


300 00 


93 75 


111 45 


2G 15 


22 50 


111 90 


286 35 


960 50 


1,867 20 


532 15 


603 70 


383 75 


688 45 


275 95 


6 22 


$101,406 44 



\ 

i 

• 1 



gmg . 'fy,y »/ ? ; »' ? ^i^^j^ i V ^^ ■ '"'^ 



Archdale and Q.ueen streets were laid with blocks and 
cobble^, or what is known as " combination" roadways. The 
reason why these roads cost a greater amount than the 
others is because of the heavy work in removing the old 
*' debris" in Archdale street, and the large amount of extra 
work in grading and filling Queen street to bring it up to 
the level of the tracks of the East Shore Terminal Rail- 
road. Also, the excessive rains that occurred while the 
work was in progress on Queen street, which necessitated 
much of it to be done over. 

The tracks of the Enterprise Railroad in Chapel street, 



54 Mayor Ficken^^ Ammal Ilevicn). 

present Court. Negotiations are now in progress for njaking | 

iLc uIJ CoLiii.. the same width as the now. ij 

Ashley Street \yas extended from its former terminus to 1 

Line Street. A new street has also been laid out from Ash- % 

ley to President on the prolongation of Bogard Street, which \ 

will be known as Bogard Street when the connection is i 

made through the lands of Thompson. West of Ashley, \ 

two streets known as Kracke and Rosemont Streets, running " | 

from Spring to Line have been laid out, these two streets j 

have not beeii accepted by Council. J| 

STONE KOADWAYS. ] 

The following streets have been paved during the year : j 

Line street from the crossirig of the S. C. R. R. to ^leet- '^ 

ing street; Chapel street, from Elizabeth to Alexander; j 
King street, from Broad to Tradd ; Archdale street, from 

Beaufain to Clifford ; Church street, from Queen to Chalmers, -_^ 

Queen street, from East Bay to Concord street. I 

The number of square yards and the cost per square i 

yard is as follows : ^ I 

■ -. ^ 

Line street, 747 square yards $2 07 per yard. -^ 

Chapel street, 2,077 squareyards 198 " ** | 

King street, 1,389 square yards 2 07 *' ** ^ 

Archdale street, 893 square yards 2 11^ " '* :| 

Church street, 943 square yards 2 09^ " " f 

Queeii St., 854 squareyards, (Vendue Range)... 2 25| " " % 



p >i4'^^.-W^?^-'i'iW-^f.»i * S ^ ^'^yi'^^^ '<** '^ '^^' ' ''' " ' ■ • 



Thr. Street Dcparlniait. 55 | 

and in Jjine street, and also the space between tlio ti^acks^ ? 

wt'ie puV'cJ will) Cobble blonos. A part of tliis amount was | 

repaid to the city by the Enterprise Railroad Company. I 

The approach to Soutliern wharf was paved with cobble I 

stones. The other cobble stone roadways in the city have : 

been more or less repaired and kept in condition for traffic. \ 

A concrete wall, or bulk head, has been built at the east 
end of Market street, the street filled to the level of the 
tracks of the East Shore Terminal Railroad, and the street 
repaved. The approach to the Ferry wharf has thus been ■ 

much improved. Some further work is necessary in jMarket ] 

street, west of the East Shore tracks, to make the crossing 
as easy as it should be, and I trust that the Committee on 
Streets will see proper to order it done during the coming ■ 

year. 

BLUE STONE FLAG AND CURB. • 

The Committee on Streets determined to adopt the plan 
of laying some of the sidewalks in the less frequented streets 
with a single line of three feet in the centre of the side- 
walk ; the other streets have been paved entirely as for- 
merly. Vie have a large amount of flag and curb on hand, 
v.diicli will be laid the coming year. Below will be found a 
list of the streets in which sidew^alks have been paved and 
curbed during the year, and the kind of paving used, en- 
tire, or three feet ; also the number of feet in each street : \ 



9 if >' fm'*mr Jvmi ^ ''f ^ ^V'^%' m' W 



Mayor Ficheii^s Annual lieviciv. 

FLAG A.ND CURB LAID DURING THE YEAR 1892. 



STEEETS. 



Broad street 

Line street 

Rutiedge street 

Rutledge aveLiue... 

Mary street 

Church street 

Mazyck street 

Hasell street.. 

Calhoun street...... 

Henrietta street... 
Wentworth street. 
Arehdal e street. . . . 

Market street 

Mill street 

Ashley street 

America street 

St. Philip srreet.... 

Bee street 

Ladson street 

Bull sireet 

Doughty street 

Coming street 

Hudson street , 

Franklin street.... 
Montague street.... 

Pitt street 

Queen street 



Flag 



entire 3 



Flag 
ft. 



Curb 



Curb 
relaid 



3,997 
9,]0i 
5,210 
5,028 
529 
10.469 
1,938 
3,148 



2,774 

6,320i 

4,972! 
8,530 



1,152 

7,430 

1,049 

3 ,584 

900 



10,238 



2,714 
324 
288 
303 



;,oii 



2,817 
921 
4,165 
9,S6G 
2,481 



4,669 
1,107 
1,253 
2,117 



3,173 
4,472 



88,001140,052 18,713 



491 

J, 175 

819 

32 



1,54 7 1 
480! 
611 1 
92S1 
39 6 1 
9251 

i,o: 



•.=^1 



1,251 
909 





307 




'" 743 


1,169 
686 
640 


861 




1,656 


200 
111 


2,064 

noc 


291 



44 S 
438 
807 



16 



4.248 



Totalfiag 128,053 feet. 

Total curb 22,961 " 



151,014 feet. 



BRICK SIDEWALKS. 



No new work of any importance has been done, the Com- 
mittee having determined to use flagstones instead of brick 
v/herever any new work was necessary. The amount ex- 
pended under this head being for the purchase of a iQ\^ 
bricks, and the labor for general repairs and gateways. 



^55j5j!Rj;^»TOmrW^ 






The Strcd DepartTn-ent . 57 

PIPE DRAINS. 

The following drains have been laid during the year, 
viz: 

Doughty street, 12 iuch 41G feet. 

Carriere's court, 12 inch 240 " 

Baker's court, G inch 175' " 

Greenhill street, 12 inch 500 " 

Council street, 12 inch 306 *• 

Thomas street, 12 inch 689 ** 

Butledge street, 12 inch 294 *• 

Fishbume street, 24 inch 483 '* 

Vauderhorst street, 12 inch 536 " 

Prioleau street, 12 inch 240 " 

Murphy's court, 10 inch 270 '* 

Reid street, 12 inch 330 " 

Orange court, 10 inch 220 " 

Beaufain street, 12 inch.... , 475 " 

PLANK ROADS. 

No new plank roads have been laid. The old roads have 
have been kept in repair. The Line street road was taken 
up and replaced v^'ith stone. I respectfully recommend that 
the John street plank road, from Elizabeth to Meeting 
street, be taken up this year and the street be paved v/ith 
blocks, thus completing the connection with the railroad 
depots with Meeting street. 

Wooden curbs and crossings have been put down in many 
of the unpaved streets, at the request and for the conven- 
ience of the citizens. 

MEETING STREET SlfELL ROAD. 

Only 5407.85 has been spent on this road for labor dur- 
ing the year. 9,041 bushels of shell was purchased, which, 
together v/ith what was on hand from last year, has kept 
the road in fair order. Considerable material and labor 
will be required to preserve this road in good condition 
during the coming year. 

During the month of April, some 75 tons of refuse Pyrites 
was obtained from the Chicora Phosphate Co., and 130 
square yards of roaSway was laid in Spring street, just east 



9!^Wf ! l^iW'^ll^^'^^-'' 'f'^^' ^ ' ' y ^ 



5.8 Mayor Ficken's Annual Review. | 

of Chestnut street. I am glad to report that this experi- \ 

ment has been quite successful I can see no evidence of ^ 

any injury ]iaYi)]g been sustained under the heavy travel | 

to wliich it has been subjected. If this material can be ob- | 

tained at a reasonable cost, it will make fine drives in our '| 

streets, whicli are known as residence streets. A. shell road I 

has been laid for a short distance in Spring street, east of _ 1 

the above mentioned I'oad. - $ 

Permission having been granted the City Railway Co. to ! 

extend its tracks through Spring from Kutledge to King \ 

street, this department, at the request of the Company, re- \ 

payed the street at a cost of §1,867.20, which amount was | 

refunded by the Railway Company. | 

SCAVENGER DIVISION. | 

The number of loads of garbage hauled during the year | 
is 38,950. During the summer, at the request of the Board | 
of Health, the force was increased, and we now have 41 I 
mules, with carts and harness. A large amount of material, | 
such as stone, bricks, pipe, gravel, shell, etc., has been 1 
hauled for the Street Department, in addition to the gar- 
bage. It gives me pleasure to bring to your attention, the ,; 
efficiency of the officers and emj^loyees who have this im- | 
po.rtant work in charge. I 

Your attention will, no doubt, be attracted to the large 
amount for *^ general police." This expenditure is not only 

necessary to keep the streets clean, so far as the eye is con- I 

cerned, but becomes of great importance v/hen viewed from \ 

a sanitary stand point, the health of the city being para- 1 

mount. Under this head is charged the expense of clean- | 

ing the drains and sand-pits, which is a matter of vital ira- | 

portance. I 

'A 

THE CHAIN GANG. \ 

i 
This force commenced work July 19th, and has been con- 
tinued daily, whenever the weather permitted ; the average 
number of convicts being about 15 a day. It was decided 



M^,^j ^ y ^yy y ^ ;. ;» |V^^ jf^ ^:^"^ ' ?^^t ' r ' ^^"y " '-^ ' ^ '' 



The Sired DcjwrtmeuL 59 



to eiriploy the gang in cleaning the streets north of Shep- \ 

]tv.^a LU',:i, ■.li:^ }>]...d>. iniporUau svork has been done, with- I 

out cost to the department except tooh.-; and a little lum})er. ] 

The committee in charge and their subordinates, have given j 
me hearty co-operation, ajid I feel it my duty not only to 

acknowledge my obligations to thera, but to say that tlie I 

system is a complete success. 1 

Very respectfully, 5 
T. A. HUGUENIN, 

Sujjt. jSireeis. 



60 Mayor Ficlea's Annual Review. 

REPORT OF HEALTH OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1892. 



City op Charleston, So. Ca., 1 



Department of Health, Januaiy 1st, 1893. 

To the lIo7ioroMe the Mayor and Aldermen : - I 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to suhrnit my annual I 

report, conveying the tables of vital statistics and meteoro- I 

logical observations, with such proceedings of this Depart- | 

ment as have been undertaken for the benefit of the | 

Department and the general health of the city, for the year | 

1892. I 

Charleston has been entirely free from epidemic disease, J 

excepting a partial visitation of La Grippe, causing 2S ! 

T/hite and 16 colored deaths. With the spring the disease | 

disappeared. There were 4 white deaths from diphtheria | 

and no colored. No scarlet fever deaths ; 14 white and 13 | 

colored deaths from typhoid fever. This is a lesser number | 

than the record of deaths shows for this disease since 18G5, *■: 
and would indicate a good, healthy v/ater supply and a 

generally cleanly city. | 

There were 258 deaths from diarrhoeal diseases. This is | 

an immense number- Year by year we realize that there ! 

is impure and unwholesome food sold in this city. It is | 

most important as we have indicated year by year, to have ^ 
a food inspection. This should be commenced on hov/ever 

small a scale, and any outlay would be abundantly repaid | 

in the diminution in the death rate, and in the increased k 

health of our citizens, white and black. I 

There were 44 deaths from consumption among the % 

white, and 178 amoup- the colored. Total 222— one death ? 

from consumption in every 8| deaths occurring during the ': 

year. During the year the United States, in August, Sep- t 
tember and October, was threatened with a Cholera visita- 
tion. About the middle of August, the disease became pre- 
valent in Hamburg, and as a steady stream of immigration 



(^K}i 



:;»7^T!^;;gr^y» ^g ^ ^ 



Departrmml of Bcalih. 01 



eomos from thai port to New York, it v/il] bo readily seen | 

as tlie U. S. Government took no steps to sto}) this immi- | 

gration, that the country was constantly threatened. I 

Charleston shared this feeling of a dangerous possibility. | 
Happily only a few cases of Cholera were reported in New 
York City. The greatest care was taken at tlie quarantine 
station, and inspections were rigidly carried out. Mayor 
Ficken at once organized a system of volunteer inspection, 

by appointing two citizens from each square or block. A I 

very general interest was manifested, and the entire city \ 

was cleaned up. j 

An additional quantity of disinfectants v»^as purchased ". 

and freely and abundantly supplied to the citizens. f 

The scavengering force of carts was increased, and the 

garbage was removed ever^'^ da}^ at an early hour in the i 

forenoon, and before midday the cit}^ was relieved from all : 

decomposing waste matter. I 

QUARANTINE. J 

Charleston Harbor is possessed of a quarantine plant, | 

second to none in scientific equipment for disinfection. \ 

Whilst the danger ol cholera was upon us last summer, \ 

it was a source of congratulation that we were prepared | 

for infected ships, to have every dangerous article of cloth- | 

ing, bedding, &q., taken out and subjected to 230° Fah- ' | 

rcnheit. I 

In the month of June, a series of careful experiments ! 

were made by Dr. E- Wasdin, Prof, of Bacteriology, at the ! 

Medical College of the State of South Carolina, as to the ' | 

germicidal value of a steam cylinder. Some JO or 12 I 

different forms of Bacteria or Microbes were put into the ^ 

chamber, and under the influence of a temperature of 230° i 

Fahrenheit, all were killed except the Bacillus, Subtilis, an i 

innocuous Bacillus, the most resistant to lethal influence j 

known. 1 

During the past two months, the Station has been en- ; 
tirely renovated and the two v/harves rebuilt, the build- 

ii^b^ overhauled and painted and repaired, the grounds ■ 



." I. 



7^;;J 'I 



! ^J l » ! 5W^'^^-!! '! :^y»>?^.Tf^i f 4^ J ^^^ * ' ** '' * 



<^)2 Mayor Fid-oi's Annual Review. 

made into a park, trees planted and the place generally 
improved. 

Great credit is due to the AJaritime .Sanitation Commit- 
tee, under the chairmanship of i\lr. Hall T. McGee, as also 
is due full recognition of the untiring efforts of Dr. Robert 
Lebby, Quarantine Officer, to keep the Station up- to a high 
standard of perfection. The Station has been kept free 
from disease. Four vessels arrived from Hamburg ^vith 
foul bills of health — cholera being there prevalent. They 
were thoroughly cleansed and disinfected, and allowed to 
the city. 

There were 200 arrivals at Quarantine during 1S92. 

Steamships 75 I PJrigs 10 

Barks 63 | Schooners 62 



Africa 1 

Belgium l 

Cape de Verde 2 

Coastwise 77 

France , 4 

Germany 12 



Italy 2 

Madeira Islands 1 

Portugal 4 

Sicily „, 2 

South America 9 



1 



Great Britain 18 I Sweden 1 

Holland ; 3 | West Indies 58 

Honduras 1 

Total 200 

SANITARY INSPECTORS. | 

The duties of the Sanitary Inspectors, as arranged in | 
Charleston, are most important. To them is entrusted a \ 
house to house inspection, to discover any nuisances affect- 
ing or likely, to affect the health of the occupants of the \ 
premises. \ 

The City is quadrisected and divided in Health Districts. \ 

One of the Sanitary Inspectors is assigned to each of these i 

Districts. _ I 

It is his duty to watch out that the garbage carts attend I 

to their duties in the earlier half of the day, and also to j 
make an inspection of fifty premises every day, reporting at • \ 

this office every noon, making the same in writing and ; 

specifying his day's work, noting all matters requiring ] 

attention. : 



^,^.^r^.....^r-----r^'T ^'^'Pm^mm • ; ' '\ 



Depnrlmcni of Health. G3 



DISINFECTION. 



During the past, year they have been active, intelligent ? 

and faithful. * 

The need of additional inspection for food and plumbing \ 

is ever present, and it is a great need. A proper service of ) 

this kind would be of great use in diminisliing disease. ] 



Perhaps there is no service in the city more faithfully \ 

done and of more use than this work. \ 

The Health Detective, Mr. Nipson, has now had many \ 

years experience, and is most faithful in his work. t 

Every house where a case of infection or contagious dis- : 

ease occurs, is required to be reported by the attending phy- 
sician, and at once the Health Detective is ordered to go to \ 
the premises and furnish such disinfectants as are required. 
As soon as the case terminates, the rooms are filled with '; 
Dioxide of Sulphur, the drain, vault, etc., etc., are carefully ^ 
examined and thoroughly disinfected, and, where requiring 
it, change is made. For years Vv-e have had comparatively \ 
fevv' deaths from scarlet fever, and only a few deaths have :< 
occurred from diphtheria, the greatest care is taken in these \ 
diseases; our record for the past year shows a fewer num- ■ 
ber of deaths from typhoid fever than we have had in , 
twenty-five years, although the City must have increased 
considerably in population. '■ 

There were 70 houses fumigated and disinfected. 

14,701 persons were given chloride of lime. 

91,400 gallons of copperas solution disinfectant were dis- 
tributed. ' 

The stench traps ordered last year have been received, ■ 

00 in all ; of these some 18 or 20 have been" put down in 
places that were emitting very offensive odor. The traps 
have proved most efficient. 

Glanders — Number of horses, 3 ; mules killed, 3. 



^"^i t^^fi ^ y * ^'?^-- ^' -*^~ '! ^ ' ^' ^ 



64 



Mayor Ff.chm\^ Animal Review, 

3NTEKMKNTS. 



Interments were made within the City limits during tlie 
the year 1892 at the following burial grounds : 



WHITES. 

















U 




^|.: 


1^ 


j3 


^ 












9. 


II 


c 

a 






1 

< 




2 






c 





St. Philip's church yard 

St. Paul's church 3^ird 

St. Mary's church yard 

St. John's Lutheran church yard. 
St. John's Chapel church yard.... 

St. Peter's church yard 

3st Baptist church y'^rd 

1st Presbyterian church yard 

2d Presbyterian, churcii yard 

Bethel church yard T. 

Circular church yard 

Unitarian church yard 

Wcntworth St. Lutheran ch. j^rd 
K. K. Beth Elohim church yard... 
Seaman's church yard 



2 1 



"> l! 



Total. 



11. ..I... 

el 6i 9 



1 1 
1 ... 



\l 



ip 



11 1 



li 
1 ...! 



.j...| 



v\ 



.1 2 
■ i 1 
.i 2 



1 o 



70 



colori':d. 



Ephrat 

Colored Lutheran.. 
Colored Catholic... 

Colored Baptist 

Bathsheba 

Calvarv Episcopal.. 

Colored Scotch 

McFhelia 

Brown Fellowship. 



Total, 















jj 


^- 


>J 


b 










0) 


. ^ 






b 


6 


M 








^^<\^ 


s^:! 



41.. .! 2 
2 

9 

"I 



1| 2 



= i^^-'.Si^ 



I -4 

"c 



:i :^i 



3; 2 
4 4 



2! 1 
7i 8 



21 1^ 



1! 2! 1 
2 7i 4 



24 
34 
11 

o 
O 

7 
14 
62 



H' Oj 7|11 ]0]5'22;15;iLi6il6il4'lt)0 



iiyj^;g5>roig;,ff|jB ^^ 



Deparliaeid of Health. 

PUBLIC CEMETERIES. 



G5 



:3 L^ 






11 

31 30 



IS 



1^ S ^iS'^l . 



1 3, 1 

46^38!3j,28 



White... 2 

Coiored , |29|20;3l)23 

Totols 3]J20|32 23 32 31|46'39 38|29 



li. 
24131 

_j_! 

25|31|377 



11 

366 



SCaVENGERING. 

This very important service of Sanitary Police, is under 
the direct supervision of the Health authorities. In look- 
ing carefully over the cities of the United States, and com- 
paring notes with various Health ofiicers, I do not find 
many cities where the w^ork is as efficiently done as it is in 
Charleston. The important feature here is, that the City owns 
the plant for the service, and thus is able at all times to 
have entire control. About 30 carts are constantly employed, 
and from early morning hours are at work in carrying 
out the garbage beyond the City limits. It is deposited on 
the salt marshes to the northeast of the City, where the tide 
flows in and out every day. In a few^ w^eks after it is placed 
there, decomposition having gone on, all traces of unpleas- 
ant odor disappears. The superintendent of the carts, Mr. 
Bischoff, has been very attentive to the work. During the 
j)revalence of cholera in New York Harbor, additional carts 
were put on and all or nearly all of the garbage of the City 
was removed out before 10 o'clock A. M. 



The number of loads removed during the year was : 



January 1 

Ffbruarv i 

AprTL.:;; : [ i^.^^ 

May I 

June J 



Total. 



July 3,052 

August 3,005 

Seuteraber 4,117 

October 3,442 

November ....: 3,013 

December 3,159 

38,950 



|lf!S5^ff??«!3G!yfS^^^ 



mn'. w"^*' !Pv jfj 



C6 Mayor Ficlcmh Anmi.al Reviciu. 

NIGHT SOIL. 

During the year 1892 there were 2,230 vaults cleaned out. 
These horj'ible receptacles, eternally storing up foul offen- 
sive, decoraposible and decomposing juaterial, and emitting 
odors that at times are almost unbearable, still continue as 
a blot on our sanitary work in Charleston. 

There are probably 10,000 vaults pouring into tlie soil 

solutions of offensive a)id unhealthy material, rendering ] 

our sub.soil more or less dangerous to human life. | 

Constant attention has been called to this serious evil I 

during the past ten or tv>'elve years from this office. So far I 

it has been impossible to grapple the problem with any I 

likelihood of success. Last year we suggested at least a I 

commencement of the work, following the system adopted 1 

in Germany, of taking the city by sections- Some special | 

tax or arrangement should be made to meet this most press- | 

ing need. The city could be divided into four or five parts, j 

taking four years, a term of administration, for each, and if J 

found easier of accomplishment a shorter term could obtain. | 

Taking from White Point Garden, the work could be | 

arranged for up to Broad street as section No. 1 ; from this 1 

point, the work up to that point having been finished, could | 

be carried to Wentworth, and when this section — No. 2— j 

was finished, it could be carried up Calhoun, as No. 3 — ■ | 

and from there to Spring street as No. 4. It occurs to us ^ 

that in this w^ay water could be secured from the Artesian I 

well service for the necessary flushing, the company finding | 

a demand for their water, would doubtless arise to the great -^ 

exigency, and by further boring obtain the necessary | 

water. We have for years recommended that no twenty- | 

four hours should elapse without having every particle of J 

excreta washed into the river. 1 

1 

CITY DISPENSARY SERVICE. 1 



During the ])ast year the dispensary service has been 
modified from the system in use for nine years. 

The city has been divideil in 6 Districts in lieu of 4 



?fP!iy^ww»fgwwy w^ - • • -yT^w^:'^^:''>r^^^r^"^ 



\ 

Department of If ccdtJL. ()7 \ 

Districts, and 6 Physicians and G Druggists have been orn- • 

plowed in ilea of d. ' 

The change went into operation on June 1st. It is too 
short a period to draw a comparison as to efficiency. The !• 

tables show a large amount of work done. In 189] there 5 

were 25,829 cases treated in the four Health Districts^ ! 

In 1892 there were reported 23,897 cases treated. It is, _ \ 

however, a grand charity, and as a rule the best service is 
rcjidered to the poor. It is open to all, white and black. 
There were 4,328 whites treated, and 19,569 colored. Total '• 

23,897, during the year. i 

CITY DRUGGISTS. ; 

The following is the report from the Druggists enumer- ; 

ating number of prescriptions filled on orders from the ', 

City Dispensary Physicians. It will be noted that there are ; 

different Districts as to the year the new service of 6 Drug- \ 

gists in lieu of 4 having gone into effect, June 1 : = 

Health District No. 1— From January 1 to June 1 1,765 , 

No. 1— From June 1 to December 31 1,068 : 

" " No. 2— From January 1 to June 1 2,569 ] 

'' " No. 2 — From June 1 to December 31 ....2,244 

*' " No 3— From January 1 to June 1 750 

*• " No. o—From June 1 to December 31 1,655 ; 

" No. 4— From January 1 to June 1 2,243 : 

" " No. 4— From June 1 to December 31 2,217 ■ 

" •' No. 5— From June 1 to December 31 817 , 

No. 6— From June 1 to December 31 1,623 

Total 16,921 

FINANCIAL. 

Amount appropriated $15,040 00 

Amount appropriated additional for purchase and distribu- 
tion of Disinfectants, etc., etc 2,600 00 

Total appropriated $17,640 00 

Amounts expended 17,460 88 

Balance $ 179 12 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. HORLBECK, M. D., 

IleaU/i Officer. 



"^^ 



i!!g[!^fflW!y !;^i ^ ^J| l ^'J >^' f W^^ 



68 Mayor Flcketts Annual Reoicoj. 

MOE/J^UAEY 81\AT7STTr:S 

llErORT.OF THE NuMBER OF DeATHS IN TJIE ClTY OF ClIAKLES- 





TON IN EACH MoNTlI, 


Foil THE Year 1802. 






WHITES. 



Causes of Death 






>v 



lo! a; 



-\<\:£\OVA\^\ ~ 



iMbumiLUiria 

Alcoholism 

Anaemia 

Anasarca 

Aneurism, Aorta 

Angina Pectoris 

Apoplexy 

A ppendicit is . , 

Asthma 

Ataxia Locomotor 

Atheroma 

Bowels, Congelation of 

Brain, Conuestiou of 

Brain, Effusion 

Brain, Hannorrhnge 

Brain, Intiammation 

Brain, Softening of .. 

Bronchitis 

Bronchitis, Capillary 

Cachexia 

Calcuh, Hepatic 

Cancer 

Cancer, Ileum 

Cancer, Liver 

Cancer, Stomach 

Cancer, Uteri 

Chill, Congestive 

Cholera Infantum 

Cholera .Morbus... 

Consumption 

Consumption, Laryngeal 

Convulsions 

Convulsions, Puerperal.... 

Croup 

Debility 

Dementia 

Dentition 

Diarriuea : 

Diphtheria 

Dipsomania 

Dropsy, Hepatic 

Dysentery 

Embolism, Cerebral 



5 2 



3 2 



...!... I 2 



3i... 



11... 



3! 2| 1 

li...L. 



1...!... 



..!...! 1 ... 
Ij II 1 ... 
..|...l... 1 



1! 1| 

1! 



2i... 

9,' 4 



1!... 

3i 3 

31*6 



5; li... 

.! J:... 



i|.. 
]:.. 



o 

1 

1 

3 

25 

1 

] 

2 

1 
1 
5 
6 
2 

1 

9 

10 
6 
3 

] 

o 

1 
1 

G 



4 

25 
o 
A-i 
1 
12 
1 
] 
5 



i yflj <« *B?«{i.^!j^tyj»S fi m '"■ ' ' ■ ' '' ^ 



I)cp aril I tent of J lea U h. 09 

Deaths ix the City of Chaklestox. — (Continued.) 



v/hjtj: 


^. 
























Causp:s of Death 


>. 

ci 
T- 

a 
t-5 


f 

a; 


P5 


'5 


J5 






.♦.3 

< 




CP 

c 
o 
O 




1 


1 

7 


Endo, Carditis , 








1 
















JMiteritis 










1 

2 


1 

8 


1 


2 


2 
' 


1 2 


Eotero Colitis 










2 
1 


. i« 


Erysipelas ., 

Fever. Congestive .. 








... 




li 3 




1 
2 












1 
3 
5 
3 
2 
14 

o 


Fever, Gastro-Enteritis 














1 


. . 






F'ever Malarial 














9 


I 


2... 


Fever -Fiierperal ....... 






'■' 


1 


... 


... 


1 


1 
2 

] 


Fever Remittent 
















Fever, Tvpboid 

Fever Tvphoid Malarial 


2 


1 




] 

o 


o 

... 


1 

... 


... 


3 


2 




I 

1 


Gastritis 

Gastro-F^nteritis 


li 1 


... 
... 


"2 


1 
1 




... 
2 


*i 


...! 9 


Haemoptysis . , . . .... 








li 1 


Flfemorrhage, Post Part 

Fleart D!«;ea?e of 




7 


1 

3 
1 




















1 

25 
2 
1 

9 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


... 


2 


o o 


Heart FIvi>£'rtropby 








FJernia, Strangulated 

Hydrothorax 


... 


















1 
















1 


Inanition 


1 
10 

"i 

1 


1 












] 






3 


Xnfliienza 


...1 3 
1 1 

) 


"i 

•• 


3 

i 

1 








I 
4 


?s 


Intussusceptio 

Kidney, Bright's Disease of 

Kidiie}', Inflammation of 


... 


... 


"i 


"l 


3 


2 

9 


1 

13 

n 


Eepros Y 


1 












2 

T 


Xjiver A^bsoess of 


1 
1 










Liver, Giirbosis of 

lilver, Coi!2:cstu)n of 


1 


2 1 


... 


•• 






1 


'l 


o! 


8 
1 


Liver, Inlianimntion of 




"T ■ 
















1 


1 


Lungs, Congestion of 


s 


2 




2 


"i 

2 

1 




2 


1 


1 






... 


n 




1 


Marasmus 


' 


1 


"i 

3 

2 

1 


1 
] 


1 


4 


1 


2 


3 




' 


Ki 


Meniuf^'itis •. .. 


1 


3 


iSeurasthenia ... 












11 


9 


Old Age.... '. 


5 
1 


7 
1 


"i 


] 
1 


"i 


2 
1 


1 

1 


?i 2 


6 
1 




29 


Paralysis .?. 

Parturition , 


3 


3 


]7 

9 


Pericarditis 




1 
1 
1 












1 


Peritonitis 




1 












2 






... 


4 


Placenta Prtevia 














1 


1 


Pleurisy .. .. 






1 


1 








i 






9 


I^ncuniouia 


3 

... 


3 


5 








2!l 


2|2 


18 
1 




] 










Ptomaine Poison 










1 
..-1... 




1 


Pytemia 










1 


2 


... 


... 


1 ... 




1 


o 


Pvosalr)in<>"itis 


1 








1 


1 


Kheumat'sm 






1 

1 










1 






1 


•Sclerosis 














1 


i! ,. 


... 


1 


2 


Hcrofula 
















1 1 


... 


1... 


1 



f ^ m!^-^n'^9»}rw^i \ iv'' ' f > i'»'^^^ 



70 " Mayor Fichn^s Aanual Ilrmcw. 

Deaths in the City of Charleston — (Continued.) 



WHITES. 



Causes of Death 



bepticiemia 

SepticA^mia, Puerperal. 

Spioe, Disease of 

Syphilis., 

Tracheotomy 

Trisraiis Na.scentium.. . 

Tuberculosis., 

Tumor , 

Ulcerj Gastric 

Urj^mia 

Whooping Cough 

Wou nclfi , i D testi ues 



Totals. 





















t4 






,• 












C.) 




o 






>4 




1 


II 




< 


c/: 


>-< 

o 
O 


o 


-a 
§ 



56'57.54'42 46 



3 3 



1 1 



2 3 



1 1 



1 

35 GO'42'50^46 



50'48 



14 

2 



32 
2 
1 
1 

10 
1 

5S8 



r j ' W Pf j t fffy - i 



:,U «l*\M^9fm .w»^' jm. ' HW ' l'tJ i fi- ' gWW 



Department of Health 71 

Deaths in tiik Qvvy of CHA}tLEST()N-— (Oontinukd.) 



BLACKS AND COLOliED. 



Causes of Death. 




Q 




• 
< 




6 




■4-3 
< 


a; 


1 


III 


1 


Abortion , 




1 




















1 


A bso{?ss . . 




















1 




1 


Albiuninuria 


\ 










1 










*> 


Alcolinjisni . 






















1 


Aiia^^ifiia . ... . . 
















1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


"a 

2 

... 


1 
2 

... 

... 

"l 

1 


9 


Aiieurisiii 


















9 


Apopl*^xv 




4 




2 


' 


1 

1 


2 


4 

1 


9S 


Asthnia 




4 


A thcroiiia } . . . 










1 


Ro^yel3, IiifiJimniation of. 


2 


1 


... 


4 










1 
1 


R 


Brain, Concussion 












1 


Brain, Congestion 




2 
1 


... 


... 


2 




1 
1 
1 
1 


2 




3 
1 


11 


Brain, HromoTrha<^e 


1 


5 


Brain Inllanimat'on 










l! 


9 


Brain Softening 








... 










1 


Brain TuTaor 


1 

9 

4 
















1 

1 


... 


3 
2 


9 


Bronchitis... 


G 


4 


1 
2 


2 
3 




1 


2 


2 


'^T 


Bronclii tis Cs pillary 


in 


Cachexia 'N^alarial 


1 










1 


Cancer 






















1 


"l 

... 


1 


Cancer Is I a m i n 9 r y 








1 


1 










9 


Cancer Ilectnni... 


















1 
] 




1 


Cancer, Stomach 












1 








2 


(-ancer, Tongue 












3 






1 


Cancer, Uteri 




9 


•• 


1 


... 


2 










1 


fi 


Caries, Spinal Col. , 






1 








1 


Cellulitis, Puerperal 




















i 

19 


... 


1 


Chill Cone- 




1 
1 
















1 
1 
1 

5 


9 


Cholera, 1 n fantuni 


1 




1 

1 

15 

1 


4 
1 

17 


6 
14 


13 
19 


5 

9 

16 


3 
15 


3H 


Cholera, Morbus.. 


e') 


Cousunintion 


12 


n 


19 


178 




1 


Convulsions 


1 
1 


2 

i 


1 


9, 


4 


7 
1 


2 

i 


?, 1 


2 

i 


4 

2 


... 


30 


Convulsions, Puerperal 


1 








fi 


Crou p Membranous 


1 


Debi ity .* 


6 


1 


5 


8 
1 

2 


3 


... 


1 


1 


3 


30 


J^ementia 


1 


Dentition 


1 


... 


5 


4 

1 


4 
6 
3 


9 

6 
1 


9 

4 


3 
1 

1 


2 
"l 


2 

3 

1 


1 
1 
1 


36 


T^i n rr'l'4*r»'s 


^^7 


Dropsy 


1 


... 


3 


1 


13 


DroDsv Cardiac 


1 


Dronsv pTenatic 




2 


2 


... 


1 






1 


1 


7 


Dronsv. llenal 




1 




"i 

1 


2 


Dy.scntery 






1 


... 


2 


2 
1 

io 


3 


2 


1 


12 


Endocarditis 






1 


Eutoritis ' 




1 


;;; 


J. 


4 
3 


4 
9 


2 
9 


1 

4 


3 
1 


1 
4 


') 


16 


Entero Colitis 


... 


:A 



1 



g;^5E;?^»?gfSw;5?^? ^^f ; i y ^^ ^ 



■^'^ 



72 Mayor Fkheiis Annual Reiylew. 

Deaths in the City of CHi\ELESToN — (Ooxtinued.) 



BLACKS AND COLORED. 



Cause of Death. 



Epilepsy 

Erysipelas..... 

Fever. Catarrhal 

Fever, Congestive 

Fever, Continued 

Fe-ver, Enteric 

Fever, Gastric 

Fever, Intermittent 

Fever, -Malarial 

Fever, Pernicious 

Fever, Puerperal 

Fever, Keuiittent 

Fever, Typhoid 

Fever. Typho- Malarial "... 

Fistula 

Gangrene 

Gastritis 

Gastro Enteritis 

HFemi.Trhage 

Fltemorrhage, Post Part... 
Hpemorrhage, Umbilical .. 

Heart, Disease of 

Hernia, Strarig 

Hydrocephalus 

Hydro Pericardium 

Hod rophobia 

Hydro Thorax 

Impaction, Fcecal 

Inanition 

Influenza 

Intussusceptio 

Jaundice 

Kidneys, Bright's Dis. of. 
Kidneys, Coiigestion of.... 

Kidneys, Inflam 

Laryngitis 

Liver, Cirrhosis 

Liver, Inflam. of 

Liver, Cong, of 

Lungs, Hremorrhage 

Lungs, Oedema 

iVIarasmus 

Meningitis ....• 

Meningitis, Cerebro Sp...., 

Necrosis 

Neurasthemia 

Old Ago 

Paralysis 













■ 






U 




ui 








. 










rr 




'i 






1 


2. 


"Ci 




i 


>, 


3 


o 




> 


? 






»^ 


< 


■-5 


-! 


< 




6 


"^A 





.[ 1 ... 



II 1 

li... 



r 



11 -2 



.. 1 



'9i"3 



4 

J 2 



b! I 
1| 3 



1 

I 2 

II 4 



II 2 

..i... 



1 
1 
2 

i 

27 

16 

4 

2 

iH 
1 

10 

1 
1 

1 

26 
4 
2 

92 
9 
2 

1 

2 

34 

29 



'^fi^.^^f f^^ ^;^^ 



y, [■i i 't}-M! ^^ 'iW '-' ^ ! ^'!f' 'f -^"^^^f'f ! ?f ^ *^ fusBiwj. ' 



Deparimeni oj Health. 73 

Deaths in the Cyyy of Cuaklestux — (('oxtinukd.) 



BLACKS 


and 


COLORED 






























t^ 




;.< 


..I 


Causes of Death. 




if 

■9 S 


< 




c 




■J) 

1 


o 


-§ 

o 


I 

o 


December 
Total. 


Pericarditis 


...1 1 




... 




... 




... 






1 


Peritonitis 


A ^ 


1 


i 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 20 


Placenta, Prasvia 


1 




1 


1 




... 










9 


Pneiiiiioiiia/ 


ill 


■'• 


6 


.! 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


3 42 


I*neiiPaoDia, Broncho 


... 2 


PneuDionia, Typho 


!... 




... 




... 


1 


.... 




.... 


... 


... 1 


Pleurisy 


...| 1 




... 


... 


... 


... 


.... 




.... 




1 


Ivheiimatism 








... 


2 






.... 






1 3 


Bcrofiiia 


...1... 


1. 




... 


2 






2 


, . 


i 


... G 


Septicaima 


...!... 




1 


1 


... 








1 


1 


1 5 


Septieajmia, Puerperal 


...i ] 


... 


1 


1 


... 


i 






.... 


1 


1 C 


SkiiU, Fractnre of..... 




... 




... 


... 


... 


9 


.... 




.... 


... 


... 2 


.Spine, Fracture of 










1 














... 1 


Stomatitis 








1 












.... 




1 


Syphilis 

Tabes, IMesenterica 








1 


... 


... 


Ij .... 


1 


] 


... 


... 4 


... 

... 


1 

1 


1 


"i 


1 
1 


1 


31 -. 




.... 




6 


Tetanus 






... 5 


Thrush 


.. 






^ 






1 




1 




... 


2 


Trismus, Nascentium 


' 


5 


5 


2 


3 


6 


8 


5 


4 


10 


2 


8 65 


Tuberculosis 


7 




1 


4 


4 





..! 


3 
... 
.... 


5 


12 

i 


9 


5 59 


Tumor 


1 3 


ToDsalitid 


... 


... 




... 1 


Ur£emia 










1 


1 


1 


"l 


"i' 


1 




... 4 


Ulcer, Gastric 


'l 








Ulcer, Duodenal 


...!... 
















.... 




i 1 


Urethra, Stricture 




1 




... 




... 


.... 




.... 


.... 




1 


Vermes 










1 


1 






.... 






1 


\Vhooj)ing Cou<^h 






1 


1 


3 1 


... 10 


VVouiid 














l\ .... 




1 




2 


Wound, Gun Shot 






1 






1 


1 


.... 


i 


.... 


1 





Wound, Knife 


... 




1 




... 


1 


•• 


.... 


.... 


.... 




2 


O^otal 


109 


8S 


91 


95 


123 


133 


160 13U 


98 


105 


99 


86 1317 



I 



74 



Mayor Ficken's Annual Review, 



Accidents, etc. 



January 

February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September , 

October 

November. 
December . 

Total... 



WKITES. 







1 






>> 






•4^ 






b 


1 


—< 


Accident 


i 


2 


1 


1 

i 


1 

2 


*1 




1 






1 « 


CvaT^osis 




1 






1 


r, 


Drovr ned 








1 




9 


SuicJde , 






' 








1 

1 


;^ 


Undeveloped 










1 


1 


2 


6 


Murder 






2 

A 










o 


Total , 


J. 




_2 


_8 


_3 


A 





9 


J 


1 


ll 


26 



BLACK AND COLORED. 




















m 








6 


# 


lib 

alt 




si 

fig 


Accident .... 




1 


...i- 


1 




Ij... 




2 


1 
1 


4 


Sum 


1 


1 




] 




4 


*Oyanosi3 








Ij... 


1 


... 


9 


Drowned 


1 














•1 


Han^^'intr 






1 








1 


1 


Poison 










1 




...|... 








1 


Scalded 






1 
1 

9, 








""\"' 








1 


Undeveioned 


5 

7 


1 


1 
'A 




f5 


3 


4 

4 


5; 4 

i 

71 4 


1 


1 


7 

To 




Total 


o'> 





























STILL BORN. 



PREMATURE. 



\Vhite 


Colored 


1 White i 


COLC 




<!. 






0) 
















d 




'c3 







'rt 


Si 


rt 


'rt 





gl 


c: 


1 


g 






h1 








Hi 


1 


II 



22123 



45 1124 55 



13. 
12 
15! 
12] 
13 
141 

19 
20I 
179il 4 



ll... 
Ij 3 
1 2 

1! 2 
..I... 



1 9 



IG 



piffj ^^ Bwiyji^ ^ yj>i»i3w ^ ? ! ^^?i*!9>^" ! ? '.'^^^'^^^^ "r^i'Mw^y y?.: 



Deparimmi of necdth. - 75 

Comparative Statement as to Sex in Each Month. 



Months. 



White. 



COI.OKKD. 



Male 



Female Total 



Male 



January.... 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

Juue 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 
December. 

Total 



31 
24 

20 
24 
19 

S6| 
23! 
26 1 
2G! 
30 
27 

313 



29 
26 
30 
22 
22 
16 
24 
19 
24 
20 
20 
2i 

273 



56 
57 
54 
42 
46 
35 
60 
42 
50! 
46| 
50 
4S 

586 



Female 



Total 



Gr. Total. 



6161 



61 

43 
45 
50 
Gl 
63 
85 
79 
57 
56 
53 
43 

701 



109 


165 


88 


145 


91 


145 


95 


137 


123 


3 69 


133 


16S 


160 


220 


130 


172 


98 


14S 


105' 


151 


99 


149 


86 


134 


1317 


1 1903 



Marriages. 


Births. 




Wh. 


Col. 


Total. 


Wh. 


Col. 


Total. 


Jau uary 


17 
9 

14 

29 

9 

19 

9 

5 

6 

8 

16 

14 


28 
28 
37 
28 
13 
23 
20 
11 
14 
25 
27 
16 


46 
37 

51 
57 
22 
42 
29 

33 

43 
30 


62 
37 
39 

47 
34 
35 
37 
44 
46 
38 
36 
35 

480 


88 
90 
61 
63 
56 
71 
79 
81 
70 
73 
76 
91 


140 


February 


127 


March 


100 


April , 


120 


May 

June , 


90 
106 


July 


116 


Auj^ust 


125 


September 


116 


October 


111 


Kovember 


112 


December 


126 






Total 


155 


271 


426 


909 


1389 



Twins— Whites 6. Colored 13. Total 19. 



-r- ^^yy. >j g w iy f ^w.75.yjjw^y i f^^^ 



%il .^ ^ n f iJ 



n 



76 Mayor FicLe lis Annual Review. 

]S(UMP,Eii OF Deaths in each AYard in each Month, 1892. 



WHITES. 















" 






Jh* 




>:^ 


" ; 




Wards. 


a 
t-5 


1 


1 


< 




1 


.b 
^ 


<5 


a 

a 
a: 


s 

s 

o 
O 


.8 
> 




'S 
t 
^ 


No. 1...... 


3 


o 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 






2 




6 


30 


No. 2 


4 


4 


2 


4 




3 


9 




2 


3 


o 


2| 32 


No. 3...... 


6 


6 


8 


2 


c 


2 


5 




3 


5 


9 


41 49 


No- 4 


3 


1 


3 


7 


6 


2 


9 




6 


1 


6 


4 44 


No. 5 


1 


7 


5 


4 


7 


2 


4 




5 


3 


5 


6! 53 


No. G 


4 


o 


i 


3 


9 


3 


7 




3 


9 


2 


2 41 


No. 7...... 





9 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


1 


4 


2 29 


No. 8 


14 


11 


7 


3 


8 


7 


7 




6 


6 


• 8 


lOJ 94 


No. 9 


4 


O 


4 


4 


1 


4 


11 




4 


8 


7 


31 60 


No. 10 


4 


8 


5 


4 


5 


5 


/ 




10 


5 


3 


4 G4 


No. 11 


7 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


8 


5 


4 


7 


4 


3 


59 


No. 12 


1 


3 


3 


2 


4 


2 


5 


1 


2 


« 




2 


31 


Total.... 


56 


57 


54 


42 


46 


35 


60 


42 


50 


46 


50 


48! 586 



COLOKED. 



Wards. 


P 


6 

Xi 


March. 

April. 


• 


g 


>. 

s 


. 
< 


September. 
October. 


November. 
December. 

Total. 


No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

No. 5 

No. 6 

No. 7 

No. 8 

No. 9 

No. 10 

No. 11 

No. 12 

Total 


3 

1 

2 

12 

/, 

6 
12 

7 
13 
19 
17 

109 




3 

3 

10 
6 

9 

5 

21 

4 

3 

17 

9 

88 


1 
7i 6 
2\ 2 
11 3 
5 10 

111 13 
1! 4 
3i 7 

22| 20 
3 2 
8 9 

15 11 

13 8 

91 i 95 


7 
1 
9 

10 
15 
3 
11 
27 
2 
10 
15 
13 

123 


7 
4 
8 

15 
11 
15 
23 
16 

133 


4 
2 
4 

14 
12 
13 
18 
24 
12 

11 

160 


8 

1 

10 

10 

11 

? 

18 
5 
19 
19 
13 

130 


1 

3 

8 

1 

2 

6 

18 

4 

13 

18 

18 

98 


6 
1 



7 

'^ 

9 

6 

20 

3 

8 

17 

15 

105 


] 
2 

5 
6 

8 
8 

22 

12 
12 
10 

y9 


6 
3 
4 
4 
6 

14 

2 

8 

10 

13 

"86 


66 

23 

57 

UJ 

107 

72 

91 

233 

61 

133 

199 

164 

1317 



T^v^,,g;g^yjggr ,WByyWf»^ ;j,< y 



Depart I nc id of lladili 



77 



Ni^M)}F,R OF Deaths, with Ages, in each Month, kou thi-: 

Yeak 1892. 



whites. 





■ i 
















-^1 




1 







Ages. 


?3 i 


11 













be 

<1 







1 


Decern 
Total. 


Under 1 year of age... 


s' 


oi 


3 


8 


16 


^ 


23 


9 


io| 


t 


6 





105 


From ] to 5 years 


2 


'i! 


4 


2 


3 


6 


7 


1 


21 


5 


] 


i 


38 


From 5 to 10 years .... 




11 


5 
1 


1 
2 


-4 


1 



9 


1 
2 


4 

21 


1 


1 

1 


1 


IS 


From 10 to 20 years... 


3 


26 


From 20 to 30 vears... 


4 


0' 




9 





3 


4 


4 


8i 


2 


4 


8 


54 


From 30 to 40 years... 


5 


4| 


15 


3 





2 


7 





4| 


5 


8 


6 


69 


From 40 to 50 years... 


5 




5 


4 


2 


6 


3 


7 


41 


8 


4 





59 


From 50 to GO years... 


('» 


7i 


2 


3 


6 


3 


6 


5 


G; 


6 


11 


4 


65 


From ()0 to 70 yeai's... 


g 


9: 


7 


8 


(> 


3 


6 


4 


'^1 


7 


5 


8 


71 


Froiii 70 to 80 vears... 


8 


8' 


4 





i 1 


1 







^ 


4 


6 


6! 51 


From 80 to 00 years... 





4! 


7 


1 


1 1' 


1 


2 


2 


1 


9 


3 30 


From 90 to 100 years- 


1 


'\ 


1 




1 ; 


1 




1 




1 


5 


.... 


: 




Totals 


56 


o7l 


54 


42 


40 


35 


60 


42 


501 


46 


50 


48 


1 586 



BLACK AND COLOEED. 



Ages. 



1 
! 










1 




S 
^ 






b 


1 c3 


^ 

i 
g 


1 








CO 

Ec 

< 




1 


1! 


a? 



Under 1 3'ear of age... 

From 1 to 5 years 

From 5 to 10 years 

From 10 to 20" years... 
From 20 to 30 years... 
From 30 to 40 years... 
From 40 to 50 years.., 
FVom 50 to 60 years.., 
From 60 to 70 years.., 
From 70 to 80 years... 
From 80 to 90 years.., 
From 90 to 100 years. 



Totals. 



24 


21 


IS 


17 


35 


37 


51 


26 


21 


2H 


21 


24 


1 13 


- 


11 


11 


18 


30 


35 


42 


23i 17 


19 


4 


1 1 


4 





3 


4 


3 


7 


4 


2| 4 


3 


2 


9 


3 


8 


9 


8 


5 


8 


2 


6i 6 


3 


9 


11 


11 


15 


13 


10 


14 


15 


13 


101 30 


13 


8 


10 


10 


4 


17 


17 


13 


14 


12 


10 


9 


10 


9 


10 





8 


8 


6 


12 


8 


9 


6 


10 


8 





6 


9 


7 


3 


10 


5 


6 


8 


5 


8 


8 


5 


8 


10 





7 


5 


4 


6 


1 


6 4 


9 


5 


33 


6 


12 


3 


6 


10 


5 


9 


6 


8 


3 


12 


9 


9 




4 


4 




1 


9 


3 


3 


2 


3 


9 












4 


9 



























_ — 


109 


88 


91 


95 


123 


133 


160 


130 


98 


105 


99 


86 



321 

230 
39 
76 
143 
135 
95 
80 
71 
93 
26 



>Y,- 



B»tBy » ^! ,' y wi! g^|^y^^ ,>!;i!ffl f <;^ ^^^^ 



78 



Mayor FicJceri's Annual JRciieiv. 



Table Siiov;ixg the Toial I^umeek of Cases Treated and 

Oil jLyi:.AiiiS i]N TUE OiT^ iioBPrjAE AND IIeALTH DiSTKICTS 
DUKIKG EACH QUAKTEK, 1892. J\0. 1. 







V/KITE 


S. 




BLACK 


& COLORf-D. 






Q jAKXER Ending. 


Quarter Ending. 




CASES TREATED. 










1 












a. 








c^ 


^ 


r. 






<^ 


; 
































^ 




o 


u 


^ 


^. 






U 


■♦J 


5 




so 


o 

CO 




r^ 






R 


^ 

s 


X 

"c 




£-< 




p 


<v 




o 


cJ 


P 


o 


^; 


« 




d 






a 


J^ 


Ci 




^ 


c: 




"^ 


-►J 


ce 






P 


o 




o 


j^ 






■-^ 


O 






<i 




a. 


p 


^ 


r*. 


^ 


•yj 


w 


tH 


O 


City Hospital 


137 


102; 124 


14^3 


.5(n^ 


1 170 17PI IKi IVO: 705^ 1214 


Htalth l;isr:rict, No. 1 


498 
113 


216!.... 

.ss!.... 




714 
171 


:13o7 


590 

894 






1947! 2661 


Health Di..trict, No. 2 


.. , 


.1. 


24.53; 262-1 


Health District, No. 3 


6.^1 


358!.... 




ICJO 


1 872 


7701.... 




16-12! 2651 


Hetdth District, No. 4 


:'.':>i 


198:.... 




461 


il3i8 


1090 





.... 


2408 j 2im 


Totals 


1G62 


932! 154 


146 


_28M 


'5276 


3523 


J86 


170 


91.55111919 



DEATHS. 










^ 










Citv Ho'^jiital 


13 
4 
1 
2 



^1 ' 


11 


11 

2' 
1 


36 
18 
32 
10 
37 

133 


36 
10 
16 
12 
18 

92 


M 


3:3 


03 

Is 

22 

5.5 

2112 


181 


Health District, No. 1 . 


33 


Health District, No. 2 


• 








51 


Healih District, No. 3.... 






24 


Health District, No. 4 






bij 




34 


33 




Totals 


20 


12 9 


11 


f'2| 


314 



No. 2. 
CASES TREATED. 








1 


! 










Health District, No. 1 

Health District, No. 2 

Heahh District, No. 3 

Health ])istfict. No. 4 

Health District. No. 5 

Health District, No. C 

Totals 


t 







10s 

5.S 
181 

99 



44f) 


W3 
3;? 

.■>4 
479 

2-18 

999 


96 
3-2 

427 
183 

875 


11 

9(«| 
431 

23;X) 


:::: 

— 


295 
448 
.385 

'% 


1673 


;32;? 286 

S7T .^.-69 
702 766 

1366|10;39 
8»7| 721 

1433 1231 

5.5-37 4612 


9li;3 
2044 

ia53 

29.5(> 
1608 
2661 

12022 


1250 
2167 
21m 
3150 
2514 
3095 

14^>12 



DEATHS. 




1 








Health District, No. 1 

Health District, No. 2 

Health District, No. 3 

Health District, No. 4 

Health District, No. 5 

Health District, No. 6 
















1 




5 
1 





1 
1 

4 

' 2 


I 

1 
1 
9 
3 




9 

8 
9 


9 
26 
26 

28 
20 
28 


el 
i1 


41 

u 

32 

4^ 


41 
45 

41 
51 


Totals 


... 




7 


10 


17 




33 


137 


T2I 


242 


259 



It is necessary to make 3 Tables, as the number of City Dispeusiiry Physicians 
■wa.s increased from 4 to 6, and the City was sub-divided into 6 Health Districts, in 
lieu of 4. 

As the change was made June 1st, for the four Districts, two-thirds of the 
cases and deaths have been put in the Table No. 1, and one-third in Table No. 2. 
as the service was for 2 months, v.hich is two-thirds of the Quarter. 



ffff^iiv^ifPfr^r^ 



Deparimerd of Health. 



79 



KuMBEK OF Deaths in each jMonth, with Place of 

XATiVlTY, 1S02. 



WHITES. 



Natives of 


1 


■X 


1 


< 






>» 
3 


CO 


5-1 

o 

Q 

a 

o 


O 


1 'o 

ii 


r2 

1 


City of Charleston 


28 
5 
1 


1 

1 


1 


20 
12 


1 


25 
2 


38 
8 
1 


17 

9 


28 
5 


21 30 26 
7 5 4 

1 1 


319 


South Carolina 


79 


Alabama ...» 


3 


Coiiiioclicut '. 










1 


'? 


Cporpia . . 


2 










1 


1 


1 
1 


o 

<-> 

1 


1 
"i 


2 


■\^ 


Jilcivylaod 


1 










3 


ATn^^^arliusGtts ..»• 






1 




... 




1 


Q 


AriphicrpTi 








1 


New Jersey 




1 

... 

"i 












1 
"i 




" 


" 


o 


xsew York 


2 


.... 


2 


1 


2 


... 


"i 


3 


1 
i 


1 
1 


10 


North Carolina 


7 


Fen D sy 1 va n i a 




1 


Tiborlp Tsland 




1 


















1 


VeriTiont 












1 












1 


Virginia 






















1 


1 




















1 
"i 


"i" 




1 


















1 

2 


1 


England 


o 

5 
S 


2 

11 
3 
1 


] 
5 
4 

1 

1 


1 

1 
4 


4 
5 
1 


1 

1 
3 


2 
1 
1 
4 


T^ 







Germany 


2 

5 


4 
3 


5 

4 


1 

1 


3 
8 


48 


Ireland 


5*^ 


Italv 


s 


Norway 


1 












9 


Rnssio » 














1 


1 


.... 


3 


Saxony 








1 


1 




.... 


i 


o 


Scotland 










^ 


Spain 














1 


1 


Sweden 


1 






















1 


West Indies 


1 

57 






















1 


Unknown 


1 

56 


1 
54 


42 


46 


35 


2 

60 


1 

42 


4 
50 


40 


9 

50 


48 


n 


• Totals 


586 



?!^^^ g iy!^?*yg^jfi ^ iyf .ffly-j ^ . ^ ' ■ ^ . fjm . iv^'* *. f^ri"^w^ ^ v{mn * ! i y ' i^' ! ?^- "ff^^w -i ^y,'^! ^^ " ^ '^ 



80 



Mmjor Ficlxn's Anntud Review. 



NU31BE1C OF Deaths in ]Cacji Month, with Tj^ace of 
ISativjty, 1892. 



BLACKS AND COLORED. 



Natives of 




f 


March. 
April. 


1- 


6 

^ 


1 


August. 
September. 


s 



c 


1 




CO 

n 

c 


City of Charleston 

Soiith Carolicii 

Alabama 


72 

28 


53 


57 
21 


65 
21 


86 
32 


94 
37 


112 
46 


98 
25 


68 
27 


60 
29 


61 

29 

1 


54 
25 


8S9 

347 

1 


Arkansas, 














1 




•■ 


1 


CoiiDecticiit 








1 
















] 


Flori<la 




1 
] 


2 
1 

1 


















8 


Oeoroia 










\ 




1 


1 








1 


8 


l^oulsiana 









" 


9 


Noitb Carolina 


1 


"3 



2 


2 
2 




1 

1 


"1 


1 

1 
5 

105 


'99 


3 

'86 


8 


Vir'"'"inia 






9 


Hiii dostan 

AVost I nd ies 




.... 




1 
1 


UnknowiJ 


8 
109 


3 

88 


9 


3 
95 


I 
123 


2 
133 


il60 


3 

130 


1 
98 


46 


Totals 


1317 



^r.^'5!rigwgy:!;^^y^^^^ 



...-. 



I I 



I 






H 



i'l 



Death from Cekxafn Zymotic Diseases in Twentv-Eight Years — From 1S65 to 1892 inclusive. 







lb 


15 


ISBG 1 18i;7 


laes 1 .. i 1S70 


1871 


1872 


im 


1874 187.5 


187S 1877 1 1878 


1879 1880 


1881 


1882 1 l.^Sli 1884 1SS5 WVi j 1887 


1888 ISfiO 


"- 


1891 1S92 Toldls ■ 










1 






1 


1 


1 












1 1 


1 










1 




1 






1 


i 








i 1 






1 1 

























S j 1 


























? 












































r 




£ S 




". 


£ i S g 




K 




^ 


? 


."i 


2 


^ 


^ 


H 






S 


2 1 & 


2 ! £ 


2 1 £ 






£■ 2 


f 


H 




■:< 


f 


S £ 


S £ 


" 


0) 








•- 




- 








^ 12 i5 








c 












n 






"J 




° 


■=! .=! 




3 !2 


■" 


° i =^ 











r 















III 1 









^ 


■:i 


if 


d!& 


S 


^ 


31^15 


sl-3 


i |5 


^ 


6 


& 


a 


&: 


-5 is 


3 


& 





& 1 5 1 -s 





p: 


a 


&li< 


i*IS 


bi-3 


&: 


S,U 


S ^ 





* d 


.& 


S 


>la 


sU 


■f 


,° 


■f 


.0 


Kimillpox 








37 1 S39 








1 1 


1 


1 




„ 


s 




si is! 


























1 








1 


1 






1 1 1 






1 ! 1 ml -^lo 
















































































5 .. .. 


S 






































































































1 sj .. 




2! ) 














21 
















12 




















nrr 1: 








il"'i ::::-| 'i| 225 


















1 ; 


































































2| 11 


'.' 


1' 






10; 20I 9! 11 















5 






8 


1:; 5 


1! 




: 




27 






211 V 


1 


1 








5i M 5 




1 1 r . ;•! : .• . ■ 






'11 "1 


11 




11 


161 17j 2.i 


23^ 21 


19 lo 


U 


3U 


la 


18 


llj 


25 2(J 


2.3 


11 




16 


^" » 


a 








31 


22 


3.5| 15j .38 


22 


34 


22 


i >- :• ■■, -- ^y M H --' 




W! 37| iO 


18| Mi lol -i.>s| ;93 


M-i' i . .i 1 , 




.,,i ,- 


.7 li 


17 


a?! P 


14 1 10J""c!""8'""si'"i5 




4 


"■ "i 


8 


7 


5 ,1 


""a 


IS 


'""s 


...... 


1; 9 


r- 


1 


r 


•■■■4 


■•-91 ■•■•■9 


12! 12 is 


Ifi 








■••■fii-s ■■■■;;i-a'--:^ 


■"i'l"":n ■■■;;■;! ",;V ,|r,^ 




























G 






































;v'- 
















311 Jill 4- 


58 






















87 i 28] 57 


:r, 


















i 












































\ ' 1 ' . n 1 . . , : , , . 








151 1 371 


91 


Irat^K 


1 |--"l "0 2^ 

as! %\ m\ sa; is2 272 150 


64 


lis 




19, 




HO 
132 


2U 

"212 

51 


1 




ll'.| 98 


1 

IK 


82 


120 

lei 


72 

"Is 







i 




.,: 27 


Tolnis 


210 


m 


152| 101 


138| 184 


185 10u| 190J 971 le-i; la.'jj 1501 8"i irai list 21.1^ 1:0 187| 100 aso 


lis 27f.j 85 218 


97 
~tl 


2221 112 211i,3IL:.i'=,oio 


Consumplloa 




2f 


7.1 


Ssi 75 


41 


So 


47 


77l SSI 91 


•17 1 13- 


ashas 


& 


|l30 


28 


1 59| 54 


1951 .57 


I'i; 


55 


19b 


(10 


192 


72! 20.0 


6.3 


203 


58 


212! 51I 20! 


59 


202 


46 


198 


m\ m 


4.i 213I 4.5 1,59 


203! 44! 17811402 


405 



Jkpariinad of IhaHli. 81 

Total Moktality, 1892— M'hites, Blacks and Coloked. 



Sex and Status. 














^-5 




CO 

be 

< 





1 

s 









a 


a 



3 

^ 


Male, AYhite 


27 


31 24 
26 30 


20 

09 


24 

09 


19 
16 


36 


23 
19 


26 
9,1 


26 


30 
''O 


27 
'^1 


3(3 


Female White 


273 


Totals, White 


56 


i 
57 54 


42 


46 


li 


60 


42 


50 


46 


50 


48 


586 


israle, Black & Color'd 
Female, BPk& CoI'd 


48 
61 


45 46 

4.3 45 


45 
50 


62 

61 


70 
63 


75 
85 


51 

79 


41 
57 


49 
56 


41 
5S 


43 
43 


616 
701 


Totals, Brk& Cor d 


109 


88 


91 


95 


1231133 


160 


130 


-98 


105 


99 


86 


1317 


Grand Totals 


16o 


145 


145 


137 


1G9 


16S 


22011721148 

1 1 


151 


149 


134 


1003 




1 





Estimated population— -White, 28,870 ; Blacks and Colored, 36,295 : 
Totals, 65,165. Proportiou of Deaths— Whites, 1 in 49 ; Blacks and 
Colored, 1 in 27 ; Total proportion, 1 in 34. 

Ratio per 1000 in the year— Whites 20.29 

" " " " Blacks and Colored 36.28 

•« " " '■' '• Total 29.20 



COMPARATIVE ?-JOETALITY. 



Years. 



Whites. 



o 



l« 



o o 



Blacks and Colored. 



C3 








^ « 


'-*:f 


0^ 


c3 


rOHO 




>^ c5 


SS 


d « 




l« 



1892 
ISUl 
IH'.H) 
1.S.S9 

1 S87 
1^^6 
ISSo 
1SS4 
1N.S3 



28,870 
28,870 
28,870 
27,605 
27,605 
27,605 
27,605 
27,605 
25,000 
25,000 



586 
553 

511 
516 

492 
549 
571 
487 
592 
540 



in 49 


36,295 


1 ,317 


in 52 


36,295 


1,371 


in 56 


36,295 


1,310 


in 52 


32,540 


1,431 


in 56, 


32.540 


1,375 


in 50' 


32,540 


1,316 


in 48 


32,510 


1,596 


in5r.:i 32,540 


1 ,250 


in42|| 27,286 


1.215 


in 46; 


1 27,286 


1,285 



1 in 27 
tin 26 
lin28 
lin23 
1 in 23 
lin24 
1 in 20 
lin26 
lin22 
1 in 21 



»^if5p^i¥J>»Ri|S^_iiiyJilJi J y 1) II .,»j.;^ fii^jijUM^ I VR^|p9j^ii^Di)^)y,u fr- 



82 Mayor FtcJcai^s Annual Rcmau. 



LONGEVITY. 



1892.— White.— Longevity Report. % 

Date of Death. Age.— Yrs. j 

January 25— Margaret Hogan [ 80 ,J 

January 9— Josephine M. Gadsden 80 - J 

January ll"-Abram. B. Anderson 80 \ 

January 17- Oliver H. Middleton 93 

Jan uarj^ IS— Joshua Toomer, M. D 80 ' 

January 13— Henry A. Due 80- \ 

January 27— Elizabeth A. Getsinger 88 j 

February 14— Martha M. Rose 84 J 

February 17— Ann Johnson 92 ■ 

February IS— Mary Muuro 89 I 

February 19 — Susan H. Robinson 81 i 

February 22— B. C. Suarez..... 81 ': 

March 2— F. B. Ellsworth 81 ^ 

March 5— Lavivia E. Grube , 84 j 

March 7— John B. Grimball 91 \ 

March 7— John Conlon 82 \ 

March 9— Juliet F. Wallace 88 1 

March 20— Amanda M. Post 81 i 

March 20— Sophia Frost 81 > 

March 24— Harriet L. Aiken... 80 " 

April 12— Jane Hart 87 \ 

May 1 — Catherine D. Parker 85 -I 



July 14— Mary Ryan 92 \ 

July 15— F. M. Robertson, M. D 85 f 

August 21— Margaret Slattery 83 

August 20— Wm. L. Legerton , 80 

September 6 — Thomas L. Legare t S3 j 

September 14 — Mary W. Hughes 83 J 

October 25— Peggy Stanton 83 j 

November 16— E. McCrady 90 I 

November 16— Mrs. I. B. Powell 87 1 

November 21 — Joseph Barado 86 j 

December 6— Ellen Hurst 81 | 

December 16— George I. Crafts 80 I 

December 24— Ann Robinson 82 | 

1892.— Colored. | 

January 8 — Cecilia Brown 92 t 

January 15— Sallie Bell 81 1 

January 20 — Ann Washington , 95 

Januarv 23— Charlotte Middleton SS ■ 



'?''^^'>'TT"ffwffy; j^»;j ^ a'ff ^^ 



Dcpariin'-n' (/ Health. 8 



Date of Death. Age.— Yrs. \ 

}^-i :r v-y p -.^.[-ri^ Eobinson '.. 81 \ 

February 25 — Sclina LoneBome 80 *; 

April l4--BeDjainin Orce 85 \ 

April 22— Peter Fraser 80 | 

April 24— Regina Ford 80 } 

April 30— Nancy Green : 80 \ 

May 3— Betsy Robinson , 89 | 

May 7— Charles Piuckney 80 

May 25 — Rose Henderson .,. 80 

May 28 — Hannah Bryan 85 

July 15— Louis Shepherd 91 

Jul;^ IG— Sam Orr 85 

July 17— Sam Ladson. ' 90 

July 18 — Carolina Long . 90 

July 26— Minda Hutchinson 90 

August 1— Charlotte Nelson........... 88 

August 13 — Jacob Jandon.. ,... 95 

August 15 — Joanna Russell 82 

August Sl—Isabclla Days 90 

September 3 — Richard Mustapha .-. 85 

September C — \Vm. Arthur ....... 80 

September 7— Robert B. Bryan 85 

Gct-ober 13— Cain Lawrence 85 

October 28- Martha Lee : 84 

October 31— Elvina Manigaul't 83 

November 10 — Samuel Smith... 80 

November 16— Joseph Chaplairu/. ". 80 

December 4— Elizabeth Miller , 80 

December 17 — Lydia Perry 80 

December 29— Amy Hey ward. 80 



ww<; y!»iftg » t » )* y^'^- j^ \^ if } ^ < ^ ^ 



84 Mayor Fklcen^s Annual lievieiv. 



ANNUAL 8UMMARY OF METEOKOLOGJCAL OBSERVA- 
TIONS MADE BY THE. U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGKI- 
CULTUIIE, WEATHER BU.REAU, CHARLESTON, B. C, 1802. 



AIR PRESSURE. 



AIR TEMPERATURE. 



Meau, reduced to 32'' Fabrenheit, 8 a. rn., 30.08 inches. i 

3Iean, reduced to 32"^ Fahrenheit, 8 p. m., 30.05 inches. | 

Mean annual, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit, 30.06 inches. "i 

Mean, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-levei, 8 a. m., 30.13 :] 

Inches. | 

Mean, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-level, S p. m., 30.10 inches. J 

Mean annual, reduced to 32° Fahrenheitand sea-level, 30.11 inches. | 

Highest, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-level, 30.57 inches, I 

February 17. | 

Ijowest, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea-level, 29.48 inches, 1 

March 8. I 

Annual range in pressure, 1.09 inches. | 

The average annual pressure, reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and sea- "I 

level, of Charleston, for twenty years, is 30.08 inches. For the | 

months :— January, 30.18 inches ; February, 30.13 ; March, 30.06 j | 

April, 30.04 ; May, 30.02 ; June, 30.03 ; July, 30.03 ; August, 30.03 ; f 

September, 30.05 ; October, 30.08 ; November, 30.12 ; December, 30.16. | 



Mean, 8 a. m., 62.0 degrees. | 

Mean, 8 p. m,, 6-L2 degrees. | 

Mean annual, 65.1 degrees. | 

The average annual temperature of Charleston, for 20 years is | 

66.1°. For the months :— January, 50.0 degrees ; February, 53.2 ; J 

March, 57.1 ; April. G4.8 ; May, 73.0 ; June, 79.6 ; July, 82.1 ; August, S 

80.7 ; September. 76.0 ; October, 67.1 ; November, 58.0 ; December, 51,3. | 

Highest, 95, July 29. - | 

Lowest, 25, December 28. | 

Annual range, 70. '| 

Greatest daily range, 28, January 28. | 

Least daily range. 1, March 25. | 

Greatest monthly range, 53, in November. I 

Least monthly range, 24, in August. | 

Mean monthly range, 38. | 

Mean daily range, 14. j 

Number of days on which temperatures were above 90 :— 20 days ; S, 

in June, 3 ; July 8 ; August, 9. | 

The average number of days on which temperatures were above \ 

i 



^ 



Deparimcni of Health. 85 



90, fit Charleston, for 20 years, is 6. For the months :--.Tune, G ; July, \ 

]3 ; August, 5 ; September, 1. . •] 

X^uijiWi'of u.iya oxi "wLich icmperaiures were below 32: — 14; in j 

January, 5 ; February 1 ; Mai-eh, 1 ; November, 2 -December, 5. \ 

The average number of days on which temperatures were below 32, . | 
at Charleston, for 20 years, is 1. For the mouths :— January, 3 days ; 

February, 1 ; November, 1 ; December, 2. ? 

Last Ice formed March 18. i 

First Ice formed November 24. ♦ ^ \ 

HUMIDITY. ' ; 

Mean dew-point, 8 a. m., 55 degrees. ; 

Mean dew-point, 8 p. m., 57. . \ 

Mean annual dew-point, 56. J 

The average annual dew-point of Charleston, for 10 years, is 58 ■ 

degrees. For the months : — January, 43 degrees ; Februarj^ 47 ; 

March, 47 ; April, 55 ; May, G3 ; June, 70 ; July, 74 ; August, 73 ; Sep- ■ 

tember, 69 ; October, CO ; November, 50 ; December, 45. \ 

Mean relative humidity, 8 a. m., 78 per cent. ? 

Mean relative humidity, 8 p. m., 78. 

Mean annual relative humidity, 78. ■ 

The average annual relative humidity, of Charleston, for 20 years, 

is 75 per cent. For the months :— January, 77 per cent. ; February, 

75 ; March, 72; April, 72; May, 73 ; June, 75 ; July, 76; August, 78; ; 

^September, 78 ; October, 76; November. 76; December, 76. \ 

Mean vapor pressure, 8 a. m., 0'.471 inch. ^ ; 

Mean vapor pressure, 8 p. m., 0.494 inch. _ ' f 

Mean annual vapor pressure, 0.482 inch. , \ 

WEATHER. \ 

Mean cloudiness, (scale to 10 tenths,) 8 a. m., 5.0 tenths. ■ 

Mean cloudiness, 8 p. m., 4.7 tenths. ; 

Mean annual cloudiness, 5.1 tenths. 

The average annual cloudiness, of Charleston, for 20 years, is 4.6 
tenths. F^or the months :— January, 4.8 tenths ; February, 4.9 ; 
March, 4.4 ; April, 4.2 ; May, 4.2; June, 5.1 ; July, 5.1 ; August, 5.1 ; 
September, 4.9 ; October, 3.7 ; November, 4.2 ; December, 4.3. i 

Greatest monthly cloudiness, 7.3, in June. * 

Least monthly cloudiness, 2.9, in October. 

There were 102 clear days, distributed as follows : — January, 10 
days; February, 9; March, 14; April, 5 ; May, 15 ; June, 2 ; July 5 ; 
August, 1 ; September, 2 ; October, 16 ; November, 14 ; December, 9. ■ 

The annual average of clear days, of Charleston, for 20 years, is 11. 
For the months :— Januar^^ 9 days ; February, 11 ; March, 13 ; April, 
13; !>Iay, 12; June, 8; July, 9; August, 9; September, 10 ; October, \ 

14 ; November, 12 ; December, 13. 



^ ? gy ^?M-' w >^>?!^^SJ5^y^ ^ -^ 



86 Mayor Ficlxn^s Annual Jxcviciu. ,| 

There vrcre 181 partly cloudy days, distributed as follows : Janu- '■. 

r,r3% 8 d:.>:;; Tvlu-ucuy, 11; ?Jruvh, 9; April, IS; May, 13; June, 20; .'J 

Jul3% 19; August, 27; September, 19; October, 11; November, VA ; | 

Deceaiber, 13. ;; 

The annual £iverage of partl}^ cloudy daj'S, of Cbarlestou, for 20 
years, is 12. For the months : January, 11 days ; Februar3\ 9 ; 
Karcli, 10; x\pril, 11; May, 13; June, 14; July, 15 5 August, 13; Sep- i 

tember, 10 ; October, 10 ; November, 10 ; December, 10. ' i 

There were 83 cloudy daj's, distributed as follows : January, 13; 
February, 9 ; March, 8 ; April, 7 ; May, 3 ; June, 8 ; July, 7 ; August, 

3 ; September, 9 ; October, 4 ; November, 3 ; December, 9. 

The annual average of cloudy days, of Charleston, for 20 years, is 8; I 

For the months: January. 11; February, 8; March, 8; April, 6; ■: 

May, 6; June, 8; July, 7; August, 9; September, 10; October, 7; j 
November. 8 ; December, 8. 

WIND. " 1 

Prevailing direction, southwest. % 
Total annual moveinent, 77,393 miles. 

Greatest monthly movement, 7,446, in May. 1 

Least monthly movement, 5,205, in November. | 

Greatest daily movement, 457, January 2. . I 

Least daily movement, 78, February 10. . ' | 

• Highest velocity, 42 miles, E., September 12. | 

Number of times the wind was observed blowing from the N., 73 1 

times; N. E., 149 ; E., 81 ; S. E., 31 ; S., 72 ; S. W., 179 ; W., 89 ; N. | 

W., 58 ; calms, none, (0.) | 

The average hourly wind velocity, for the year 1892, is 9 miles. -I 

The hourly values are ; 1 a. m., 8 miles ; 2 a. m., 8 ; 3 a. m., 7 ; 4 a. | 

m., 7 ; 5 a. m., 7 ; 6 a. m., 7 ; 7 a. m., 7:8 a. m., 8 ; 9 a. m., 9 : 10 a. ;' 

m., 9 ; 11 a. m., 10 ; 12 noon, 10 ; 1 p. m., 11 ; 2 p. m., 11 ; 3 p. m., 12 ; | 

4 p. m., 12 ; 5 p. m., 11 ; 6 p. m., 10 ; 7 p. m., 9 ; 8 p. m., 8 ; 9 p. m., 8 - J 
10 p. m., 8 ; 11 p. m., 8 ; 12 midnight, 8. ^ 

The average annual movement of the wind, of Charleston, for 10 I 
years, is 68,573 miles. For the months : January, 5,704 miles ; Feb- 
ruary, 5,451 ; March, 6,231 ; April, 0,132 ; May, 6,412 ; June, 5,873 ; :j 
July, 5,686; August, 5,363; September, 5,622; October, 5,604; Novem- | 

ber, 5.201 ; December, 5,296. I 

. . ^ 

PRECIPITATION. J 



Total, 53.32 inches. • ' 

Greatest monthly, 11.77 inches, in September. 

Least monthly, 0.51 inches, in April. 

Greatest in any 24 consecutive hours, 3.68 inches, July 5 and 6. 

The average annual precipitation of Charleston, for 20 years, is 
56.81 inches. For the months: January, 4-07 inches; February, 
3.46; March, 4.01 ; April, 4.06; May, 4.06 ; June, 5.29; July, 7.40; 



■>ij!''UM 



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ioSo'iOi {>:io']0;io! 



; !', 8 9^ S! 8; 9JU' 

' !-' S 8^ S! 8l S']0| 

; ]! 1', 9' 91 8: 8!10l 

■li: t' 8 9i 8; Si 9 

Ii; 8| Si 71 7i 7i ,8 

S: 9^ 8 71 71 6i 6i 71 

i 9: 9i S: 8 8| 8:10i 

;■ 7; 6| Cy SJ 6 6i S* 

i 6: 6j 6' 7j 7i 61 7i 

i 6 6l 6: 6' 7i 7: 7! 



]5 



i; 27 



81 8' 8' 8: Sj 9i S, *]()2:-ISl- 'S3.*i:o;^7G 



^^ 1-^il to 1811 ; 

;47, (i 

biitli C • 



I : 1792 , 1, 



:0 i 1823 1824 



182,3 1827 1829 



!)0| 

2Si 



i ! 1&56 



67 



(55; 
91i 

24i 



1530 



66 &1.0 

l(Xi! 94 
22l 20 



1S32 



66.2 
93 
20 



. s. w. 



18S6 



IvSS" 



I 



1888 1889 1 1890 



■ 60.8?i 6, 

: .")7.4.S: -i 

i 132. 
^5. W. S, 



63.6 64 9' C4.7 

;>6 iU' lOo; 100 

2^ 10, 17i 26 
.93, 

Ui' 110. 12S: 1301 105 
\V. <'. \V. .^. W, S. W. S. \V. 

.•-> 3'i.!;">: 30.6i) 30.53; so.co 

.7!' 



1891 ! 1892 



I 

65.6' 67.8 66.0 1 65 1 

97 98 95 1 95 

2b' 25! 29 j li3 

44.69! 49.461 52.18' 47 84^ 45.501 53.32 

nil 129| 120 

w. :y. E. s. vr. 

).H2. 30.{;5 30.52 

'1 2'.i.4^' 29..32; 29.3o: 29.60; 29.'0 2-..'. to 



her Bureau. 



,. . • . . . - IT. S. DEPARl'MJCiXT OF AGRICULTURES 

• _^ Wkathkk Buki:au, | 

Ci-iAHLESTON, S. C, Jauuavy 10, 1893. ) 
■ • . ANNUAL METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR EN.mK(x DECFJMBER 31, 1802, OF CHARLESTON, S. C. 

Latitude N., 32° iT. Longitude \V., 79° 56', Loeal time 20 iniiuites slower thau 75tb Meridian time. [Compiled for tlie City Board of Lloalth.] 



MONTHS. 

l8tJ2. 



TiiMFKR.vrun 

: 'i M 



.i.M 



ill 1 11 !i 11 






i f 



..II »..,ol 



,,J;uJ30.r>i ».,.,'! 



f>l ioi 



t^r 



.|ti. W.i «73i»U9! 



MKAN HOURLY VELOCITY (IN JULES) AT 






9| 12] U 



[•01 Sl 8| 71 "i 7| 7i 7; S! Ol 0,10|)Olll llil 



Abstract of iNroteornlogieal Observations made at Cliarleston, S. C., by Dr. Lining, 1737 to' 1748 ; Di\s. Clialmers and Sliecufc, 17-50 to 1759 ; John Drayton, Es<i , and Dr. Wilson, 1791 to 1811 ; 

Pvu\: 'l'o\uiioy, 181G tu 1830 ; Charleston City Board of" Health, 1832 to 18-47, (in "Census of Charleston, S. C, 1818," kindly furnished by T. P. LoNvndes, Esq.) ; 

T. P. Ravcnel, 1818 to 1860 ; in " Resources of South Carolina," 1866 to 1870 : U. S. Weather Bureau, 1871 to 1892. 





1).-\TA 




i7;-,7 


1738 


1739 j 1740 


.7 


1712 
7' 


1-13 


1714 1715 1746 


■" 


1745, 


IT.'iO 1 1751 ! 17S2 

1 1 


17.53 ! 1754 


j 


^758 


1759 1791 1702 , 1703 
■1 1 1 


1704 


1795 17110 1707 , 1798 | 1700 1800 
1 i 1 1 1 


1801 j 1802 


181)3 1804 


ISOo 


1800 


1807 130.S 


1809 


1310 


ISU 1 1816 


1 
1817 j 1618 


i 
18.0|.1S20 


1823 


1824 


1823 1827 


7829 


1&30 1»2 


\- ■ , ' ■ 


.nitlifc 








1 1 ! 1 


fioj 671 67 67 68] O5: 67 

00! ill' 101 91! 93! on; 06 

IS' i5 23j IS] 281 22; 27 

r,:<; .".l.-l -10.5I 40.0' 37.1] 41.ll 33.8 


66 


u ii i i.it 

3^ 35 .,...!!!.. ^^...i! 


65 

"k." 


64| 60! 65| 64 65 

i ??i 51' i|::;::;::: 

72.1 1 5S.1 K.O, 45.2 75,4 


64I 67] 6s| 67 67I 68 68 
1 sol 00 Oil 91_ 9; 

■".ST.O '■■-12.0' 39!li 58.9 .51.3 37.3 43.7 


1 || !! f i ^ f i !: J| 

42^ 40,8f''oiJ!ol'''S|'"S!3'!!!"Z:;;!!I!.v:"7' -'"'■'••- 

'■\v.'T'wrr''Z'Y''EV't'\v.'''s. W.-S. \v, -. \," - •'", -- - '''-'':, 
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i i i iss 

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1813 1 1S41 

1 


94] 93 
201 20 




DATA 


1U13 


IWl 1835 18.16 'j mi 


183.8 


1S30 1S40 


ISU 1812 
1 


8-15 1 181U i 18-17 . ISJS : 1849 ! 1850 Ifcol i 18.52 1&53 ' 18.54 1855 1 )&56 


1857 1 1858 1830 j 1S60 1866 1 1867 

11 1 ' 


1803 


1809 { 1870 


1S71 


1 1 1 
1872 1873 1874 1 1875 


1876 


1S77 


,„ 


1879 


1880 18SI 


1882 lSS-3 j I&bl 18« 1SS6 


1S87 18SS 1889 i 1890 


1S91 


- 


'E 




..Uu..o| 05,0 

';:!;i'!J;E|ii;-i 


US.ol O3.0I 0.),S, 06.1 

i ^ i 15 

n."i';:in7i';!;""j;! nV" 


66.1- 60.2 
07 05 
20! 24 

.„...„. ....... 


06.0 
21 


s.'Vvvs!'w: 


^M 36.1;! 


6,:,7' &-i: Ol.sj 04.9' 03.9 65.0 63.6] Ol.l' 01.2; 62.s| 62.2! 60.8?! 60.0?' C1.5?| 02.8? 02.6?' Od.lV <Vl.o' r,r..nl fi.i.o' Cin' ,155! «,l' 61 fi' fi-ji 1:1,7' «.n 5' Wl «i; 5- e.'J ,y- -2 m s' 67.ll fiS,fi' lAsI r/..<)' 63.6 

Oli Ml 02 02l 91! 01 03 92, 94; Oi 92 Sm! 04- Oil 96 ir .,,1 ,; y, ■,; m; ;.: ! , -,: p; |,, i ; ;,7 ],,, ■'' • ■■ 

211 "11 25| 241 17| 24 nil lli| 2.5! 18| 21! 131 13 -"O' 21 IV ., ., .-.,.._ 

10.41 Ji.:;i; 47.S15I 4.5.30i 24.031 30.20 •42..57 56..5S, 4a.S0, 44.05, -IO.7O; 57 4.Si -K.UV 51.22 -13.73 !■,.:", ,11,1 , ■ ; - ," :■ , ,- ; ; ',: 1 " ,- ,, 1 
,sl !i..' 1*5 031 H\ 81 so: 1110 1231 112 li7i 132: 1-13 123, 1-25 111 " - -■';., ." ; , ., 1. l, |, : , - : ' 

.\V.-5.\\'. X.E.IS.W.IS.W.JS. W.,S.W.S.\V S.W.'H.W.,S.\V.lS.W.;S.\V.S.W.^:^.\',-.,.-i. W. J - v. -\ . _ -i. >,V -. W ,--, \'.-, ^ \i , -. \-,- <. U -^ s\V. - - V:- -..,,.-.\\ N. 1-. 1. \.-. >, ., 1 ■•• 'i, '>"<>'•_, 


64 9' 01.7 65.6' 67^8 


66.0 65 1 


Ji}:^'LL 


''-^ '"•'■■■■ 


^.^.„..„ 




1 - 1 


i 1 1 


28.40 




20..y) :.s„Mi; 




















2;i.6l 


2;l.lU 


20.15 


-■■J.41I 20 11,1 




.0.40 




20.21 




211.11 






^I}l^.^l2\ 


_ 


-■'■'^ 





_ 







L. N. JESUNOFSKY, Observer, Weather JBicreau. 



Departmod of Health. 87 

August, 7.31 ; September, C.09 ; October, 4.30 ; November, 3.21 ; De- 
cember, 3.49. 

Tiiere were 120 "rainy" days, (or days on which precipitation 
from rain aud° liail occurred,) distributed as follows : January, 12 
days; February, 10; March, 7; April, 7; May, 0; June, 20; July, 
10 ; August, 10 ; September, 12 ; October, 5 ; November, G ; Decem- 
ber, 9. 

The annual average of " rainy " days of Charleston, for 20 years^ is 
10. For the months: January, 11 days; February, 10; March, 10 ; 
April, 8; May, 9; June, 11; July, 12; August, 13; September, 11 ; 
October, 8 ; November, 8 ; December, 9, 

There were 76 thunder-storms, distributed as follows : January, ; 
February, ; March, 1 ; April, 2 ; May, 5 ; June, 8 ; July, 20 ; August 
25; September, 11; October, 1; November, 2; December, 1. 

The annual average thunder-storms of Charleston, for 20 years, is 
39. For the months : January, 1 ; February, 1 ; March, 1 ; April, 2 ; 
May, 4 ; June, 8 ; July, 9 ; August, 7; September, 3 ; October, 1 ; No- 
vember, 1; December, 1. 

The last frost occurred April 16. 

The first frost occurred October 26. 

L. N. JESUNOFSKY, 
Ohserutr, Weather Bureau. 
. Charleston, S. C, January 24, 1893. 



^8 Mayor FlcJccn's Annual Review. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Charleston, So. Ca., January, 1893. 
To the Chairman and Memhers of the Board of Health. 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to suhmit tlie foHowinp: 
report of my attendance upon the 20th Annual Session of 
the American Public Health xAssociation held in the City 
of Mexico, Nov. 29— 30-~-Dec. 1—2. 

It was without doubt the largest and most successful 
meeting that this ever increasing and ever more important 
organization has yet held. 

Full representation from the United States from Canada 
and from Mexico rendered the session quite international 
in an American .sense. 

The meetings, morning and evening, were more largely 
attended and more interest manifested than I have ever 
knowm in the 12 years that I have been present at the 
deliberations of the American Public Health Association. 

■The papers read on sanitary topics w^ere quite up to the 
standard of excellence which usually holds at these meet- 
ings and the discussions (although perforce very limited 
from the immense work before the Association) manifested 
the keenest interest. An extraordinary number of nev/ 
members were elected, some 550 in number, and 75 papers 
were presented- Only a limited number of the papers were 
read — those worthy of consideration will be published in 
the yearly Book of the Association. The volumes now 
numbering 17, contain a vast fund of information, scientific 
and practical on all topics of sanitary interest, and preventive 
medicine. 

The Association met promptly at 9 o'clock, November 
29th, at the Chamber of Deputies. 

Congratulations were made to the Association by Presi- 
dent Felix Formenbo on the interest manifested and on the 
very great number of new members. 

As a number of papers were read by the Mexican mem- 



';( 'f:r 



Departmcrd of Health. 89 

bers in the Spanish language — the Committee of Arrange- 
in o^itG hp.d ]:ad such papers translated into English for the 
benefit of the members who only understood the English, 
and vice versa the English or American papers were trans- 
lated and distributed for the benefit of the Mexicans, in the 
Spanish language. • 

The first paper read v/as by Dr, Antonio J. Carbagil on 
"Influence of Climate on the progress and severity of pul- 
monar}^ tuberculosis in the United States of Mexico, and 
practical consequences that are inferred." 

He spoke of the progress and serious character so diverse 
that is taken by Tuberculosis according to the geographical 
region in which we consider it. 

I know the disease personally in the 3 zones in . pvdiich 
Mexico is generally divided, having practiced in the follov/- 
ing States, Yucatan, Sonora, both warm, dry climates; 
Queretara, tomporate, dry; Fuebia Monilos, temperate, damp; 
and Vera Cruz warm and damp. By neighborhood and 
data from patients and colleagues the State of Sinolas and 
that of Cliihuaha — and finally the Territory of Lower Cali- 
fornia. 

Dr, Liceaga has divided the climate of the great centre 
table land of Mexico into 3 classes, considered under the 
aspect of their influence on tuberculosis. 

1. There are localities, in which pulmonary phthisis is 
unknown. 

2. There are others which do not present an absolute 
immunity to their inhabitants, but phthisis rarely shows 
itself. 

3. There are localities where the disease shows itself in 
the natives, but the climate is magnificent for invalids who 
have lived in other climates. 

As an example of the first the author mentions Zaca- 
I tecas, the mortality from tubercular diseases in that State is 

I ' , • ■ 

k ■ ■ - 



90 Mayor Fichn^s Ammal Review, 

0.92 per cent, of the deaths, and from puhnonary tabercu- 
locio 0.37 ]v?r cont. ini-'ignificent figures. 

In Tenango which is 11,370 feet alcove the level of the 
sea not a case of phthisis has been seen or known in 12 
years. 

Of the 2nd class he mentions Oaxaca where the disease 
is severe. Mortality from tubercular diseases, pulmonary 
phthisis, mesenteric diseases 2.08 per cent. 
\- ', Of the 3rd class the City of IMexico from all tubercular 

affections 8.17 per cent, and from pulmonary phthisis and 
granulia 6.55 per cent. 

Nearly all in the Federal district do not pass 2 per cent. 
; and some one of 1 per cent. 

With regard to warm climates there are 2 categories. 

1. Tubercvilosis is not very frequent among the natives 
[ of Sonora — north of Sinoloa — west of Chihuaha and Lovv'er 

\ California. 

j 2. The disease is very frequent in Yucatan Campechi 

[ Vera Cruz. 

r In the year 1887 the deatlis in Vera Cruz from pulmo- 

I nary consumption were 22.G6 per cent which is enormous. 

|, " In Vera Cruz in Tuberculosis, hemorrhage is the rule, 

in Mexico it is the exception. 

Zacatecus is 8,000 feet above the sea. The conclusions 
I were, That 

1. Phthisis is excessively rare in persons who have lived, 
always or many years in Zacatecus. 

2. Cases of cure have been seen in the first and second 
stage of the disease. 

3. Probably due to elevation above the level of the sea, 
the dryness of the atmosphere, the special manner of living 
and non-crowding in small lodgings. 

4. Zacatecus beneficial in first sta<res. 



Department of Ilcalth. 91 

5. Wlien suppuration of tlie pulmonary deposits has 
cwi^jiUv.-iiv.^.J Liiui*.. ib Ioo;t5 piobabllitj of tlcnving suincierit 
benefit to warrant a change of residence, same in cases of 
galloping consumption, etc., etc. 
I *'It is necessary to make consumptives live in places im- 

possible to the existence of the bacillus of Koch, to live in 
pure atmosphere and remain as many hours as possible' in 
the open air. These conditions can be realized in establish- 
ments like those of Gorbersdorf Talken stein. It is 
possible to create similar establishments v^'ith infinitely 
superior climatic conditions in the great central table land 
of Anahuac. 

2nd. The next papor read vras by Dr. R. C. Kedezie, en- 
f titled niie Ground of Safety," 

I He indicated compidsory drainage as absolutely necessary 

' for health and happiness. 

I Ground water is always below and is always dangerous. 

\ .This water reduces the temperature, makes the air colder, 

\ makes it damp and produces malaise. Often the surlace 

\ appears dry but the ground v/ater is there. 

[ Pettenkofer of Berlin and Bowditch of Boston have both 

: contributed largely to this subject, and have fully shown 

■ the above facts and called attention to its danger. Two- 

^ thirds oi all cholera cases have occurred just near w^ater 

courses. Evaporation from the surface causes dampness 
and chilliness and depresses the human system, the chilly 
dampness of undrained soil drags us down as if we were 
living in a perpetual drizzle. 

The soil should be drained and not evaporated. Silently 
and secretly the exposure goes on, resulting in sickness and 
death. 

The grand necessity of life is air for the animate and in- 
animate. 

Dr. Kedzie gave a graphic picture of two brothers, mar- 
ried by Bishop Hayden. Both with equal chances of 
health and happiness. 

The one built on a cellar, dry enough to store a pov*'der 
niagazine. Health was everyv/here and happiness followed. 



92 Mayor Ficlxn^s Annual Picvlew. 

The other built under trees and over a soil full of springs. 

Thp o-ro';-'rul irno nhvay.^ wet, and niildov,' was constant. A 

famil}^ boi-n to him gradually died out of diphtheria, croup 

and pneumonia ; consumption finally killing his wife. 

3. The next paper was from Dr. W. A. Haskell, Illinois, 

[. on " Medical Demography." He spoke of large communities 

l^ . of people inhabiting islands free from disease. - The pol- 

p- • luting microbe enters, and in a short period thousands 

fall victims. The visitors may be seemingly free from dis- 

i. eases, still their advent results in an epidemic. The visi- 

[ tors carry with them a microbe which became pathogenic. 

\ ' He spoke of lepros}^ among the Sandv/ich Islands, where 

\ it has been only known for a half a century, and where it 

[ now prevails to an alarming degree. Canada has had it 

i for a century also Louisiana, and it has not spread. 

i Aboriginal races seem, to have a predisposition to receive 

f • these influences. He spoke of the capability of one patho- 

1 genie microbe reproducing itself from one race to another, 

when a proper race was met. 

The demography of a race should be a matter of as much 
;• interest to a country as its commerce. 

I , ' He spoke of the great spread of the plague in the middle 

]■ , ;■ ages in Europe, Endemic Bubonic plagues. 

f- In the 16th century, a board of health was established in 

f Venice. These diseases do not now spread, they are a thing 

[:- , of the past, although at onetime hundreds of thousands 

|. died. 

f This paper was succeeded by a description of the *' Climate 

of the City of Mexico," by Dr. Domingo Orvananos, mem- 
ber of the Supreme Board of Health of Mexico. He said 
the influence which the atmosphere, the waters and the 
locality, exercise on individuals when congregated in socie- 
ties and living on determined points of the earth, is very 
\ determined, and for this reason very important to the sani- 

tary physician of each place. 

Mexico, (place of Mexitli, God of War,) is situated 19° 
26' 2G' north latitude, and 99° G' 45' long. W. from Green- 
wich. Greatest width from east to vrest is 3J miles, and 



Dcpartiaeiii of Health. 93 

the frreatest width from N. to S. is 2?- miles, 4 kil.~SOO 
luetres — superficial area 14 square kilometres. Longest 
day is 13 hours and 10 minutes; shortest day is .10 hours 
50 minutes. The Sun falls vertically twice a year, and is 
nearly alvTays perpendicular. The city is 22G8 metres, 
(7460 feet,) above tlie sea level. This extraordinary eleva- 
tion causes a diminution of oxygen, and means that we in- 
troduce almost ^ part less oxygen into our lungs, than the 
inhabitants of the lower elevations, and causes certain phy- 
siological and pathological changes in our condition. All 
its inhabitants ought to suffer a certain amount of anaemia, 
but experiments practiced appear to prove the following 
facts : 

1. The number of red corpuscles which each individual 
has are generally rather more numerous than on the coast. 

2. The diminution of oxygen in the air is compensated 
by the increase in the number of respirations, which are 
from 22 to 24 per minute ; w^e may conclude that we ap- 
proximated consume the same amount of oxygen for which 
purpose we increase our respirations by J part. 

Atmospheric humidity is scarce : 8.24 m. ra. compared 
with towns of lower elevation, wdien the tension of the 
water vapor is 12 to 14 m. m. 

Evaporation in the city is extraordinary, the mean by 
day being Q.G m. m. in the sun, and 2. m. m, in the shade. 

The mean annual relative humidity in iMexico amounts 
to 61 in place of 75 or .60 that we find at lower elevations. 
The result is that we have a very dry atmosphere. Dew is 
abundant. Fogs are extremely rare. 

Clouds : During the winter and the greater part of spring, 
the sky is perfectly clear, and only a few cloudy days in 
December and January, by no means common. 

Mean annual rainfall reaches 614.4 m. m. (25 inches.) 
Number of rainy days average 139. Rainy season is from 
June to October; in the other months rain is rare. 

Snow is seen about once in forty years, [centigrade one 
degree equal to 1 4-5 Fahr. ; freezing commencing at zero 
and boiling 100°.] 



94 Mayor Flchn^s Annual Ixeviciu. 

Mean temperature during winter is 12^ 0, Fahr. 54 con- 
tregrade; that of spring 17° 8, c, 04 Fahr. ; at summer 
1G.° 6 c, 62 Fain'., and autumn, 13° 6 c, 5() Fahr- 

The daily progress of the temperature is as follows : The 
temperature between 5 and G in the morning is the lowest 
in the day; it gradually rises until 2 or 3 in the afternoon, 
when it reaches its maximum. 

The daily oscillation has been 21° 2, about 38 Fahr., in 
the shade, and 50° 7, 95 Fahr., in the sun. 

The difference between the absolute maximum and mini- 
mum in the shade reaches up to 25 degrees c in the course 
of a month, and the difference in the sun has reached 53'' 9. 

In one and the same day we experience all the changes, 
as if we were conveyed from the polar frozen regions to the 
burning zones of Africa. We have the burning soil and 
perpetual cold. 

At a little more than 4 kilometres at Popocatapel, we 
have eternal snow ; frosts are frequent in the valley of 
Mexico ; and while the sun may beat on our bodies to 
an excessive degree, a yard distant in the shade we feel a 
remarkable degree of cold. 

Prevailing winds are northwest. 

There is an extraordinary inten^sity of light in the atmos- 
phere, and it is doubtless due to this that the bacilli of con- 
sumption do not thrive. Light is not favora^ble to the 
development of bacteria and microscopic spores. 

The afternoon session was held in the main Hall of the 
Escuela Nacionale Preparatoria, a very beautiful room, 
enriched by panellings of the most ornate wood carvings. 

Dr. 11. Lavista, the distinguished surgeon of the city of 
Mexico, made a few remarks on " General Considerations 
on the Importance of Public Hygiene.'* Among other 
things, he said : 

The necessary elements of life are at the same time the 
necessary agents of death ; and how can we evade their bad 
influence, if we cannot live without them ? Hygiene, which 
to-day analyses and defines their good and bad conditions, 
gives us the key of health, and constitutes an unbreakable 



Department of HcaV.h. 95 

barrier a.f>:ainst illness. Its apostles are the guardians of 
the redemption of the human species: the}^ preach every- 
where, in families, in society, and to the individual, the 
scientific creed that, in their midnight studies has been 
revealed to them, by noble, generous, divine science, winch 
they have conquered, and are divinely entrusted with. 
Grand and sublime is the task of the physicians, who alle- 
viate pain and cure disease, but not less sublime and worthy 
of the gratitude of tiie human race, are the Ilygienists who 
prevent illness, preserve life, and aid the natural growth of 
man and of the society to which he belongs. 

Dr. Yandell, Health Officer of El Paso, Texas, read a 
paper on Contagious Diseases of the Rio Grande Border, 
and gave a graphic picture of the difference betv/een El 
Paso and the iMexican Cities separated by the Rio Grande. 
On tlie one side, Texas, where precautions are taken, there 
is very little disease, on the other, Diphtheria, Smallpox and 
Scarlet Fever prevail extensively. 

In 1890, in El Paso, there were 15 deaths from contagious 
diseases. 

In 1890, in Juarez, there were 99 deaths from contagious 
diseases. 

In 1891, in Ei Paso, there were 8 deaths from smallpox. 

In 1891, in Juarez, there were 49 deaths from smallpox. 

In 3 years there were 6 times as many deaths in Juarez 
as there were in El Paso from contagious disease. 

In Juarez, no precautions are taken. These facts can be 
multiplied many times over. 

A paper was then read by Alexander Uribe giving a new 
method of quantitative chemical analysis for calculating 
nitric acid and nitrates, etc. 

It was by the use of sulphuric acid and a pure bar of zinc ; 
as this is a chemical study requiring more or less technical 
knowledge, the minutise of the process will be omitted. 

Dr. Wm, T. Corlett read a paper** on some of the infec- 
tious diseases," and gave an interesting sketch of the great 
dangers the public were liable to in public places from con- 
tagious diseases. 



96 Mayor Flcl-en's Annual Rcvicvj. 

He spoke of the clnDgers of cliane^ing hats and cloaks 
by children. Gonorrlicea and S3'philis were readily con- 
i tracted by unclean ^vaier-closets and co-habitation. 

Scabies or itch often was taken in hotel beds and sleeping 
: cars. 

Kingworm was highly contagious, obtained from hair 
brushes. 

Proper precautions should be always taken. 
I Syphilis could be contracted from :— Drinking fountains; 

1 public towels; combs and brushes; public baths; Turkish 

I : baths. 

; ■ Sputa is voided, coughing and expectorating goes on in 

I all public places, sleeping cars, etc. Hotels are filled with 

f tuberculous patients bringing the bacillus into contact with 

I thousands of people. 

100,000 deaths annually occurred in the U. S. from con- 
; sumption. It was a disease more, very much more danger- 

! • • ous than cholera. 

^ . 300,000 patients were acting continually as active agents 

:. in distributing this disease. Boards of Health should pass 

laws against syphilis and consumption, and there should be 
a National Board of Health to carry out these precautions. 
. Dr. Gihon said that the above paper was most timely, there 

I was too much attention paid to cholera or cholera scare, and 

'■ too little to diseases most dangerous to human life right 

i under our eyes. 

I Dr. Bescisbi thought all marriages between consumptives 

i - should be forbidden, 

? Tuesday evening- was devoted to the hearing of addresses 

; - of welcome from the Mexican authorities and the hearing 

' the annual address of President Formento. The session 

1; was held in the Theatre Nacionale, a grand building, with 

|:' the stage beautifully draped with the flags of England, 

f United States anrl Mexico. It w^as a grand affair. ^Nlany of 

^ - the IMexican ladies graced the occasion filling the great 

numbers of Loggios or private boxes, 5 tiers. Archbishop 
Alarcon invoked the blessing of Almighty God on the dis- 
cussions and acts of the congress, and prayed that the reso- 



Depart mc I li of Hcnlih. 97 

lutions might be guided with wisdom and toid to alleviate 
ihc buii^aixi^;o of maiikilKl. 

A magjiiiicent band of music played the national airs of 
the three countries. 

Dr. Liceaga, Chairman of the local committee then deliv- 
ered an eloquent address of welcome. 

He said it was a source of the purest satisfaction to see 
you come from distant lands animated by the noble resolve 
to si led on all sides the light of science, and to help the 
nations of the earth to a better understanding of the bless- 
ings of hygiene. You come like Apostles of the Gospel of 
Science to preach the time honored Hippocratic Text, 
" Mens Sana in corpore sano.^' 

1. To show that to make men healthy, is to put them on 
the right road to being good. 

2. To remind mankind that nature furnishes us with 
light and air in lavish abundance. 

3. That pure water and good food, preserves health and 
lengthens life, 

4. That the clothes which cover us, must not incommode 
us, and that the dwellings in v/hich we seek protection from 
the extremes of heat and cold, must be so disposed, and the 
ground on which they are erected so drained, as not to 
become a source of harm to their inmates. 

5* The inevitable refuse of men and animals, is a source 
of -many diseases, when it is allowed to accumulate and 
putrify near us. And you show^ us how to dispose of it 
without injury either to ourselves or our neighbors, * 

That is what hygienists have always done. Witness the 
measures taken in the Mosaic law at the dawm of ages. It 
appals us to read of the measures taken against the plague 
in the Middle Ages. Yet the plague has been blotted from 
the face of the earth. 

Isolation carried to the extent of sequestration, the loss 
of civil rights, enforced celibacy, the severance of family 
ties — in a word, the sacrifice of the individual to the good 
7 



* 



98 Mayor Ficlccris Annual Review. 

of the community; our milder customs, our am.plcr resources, 
.enable us to carry onward the work of our forefathers 
in a difletent form, and justify us in hoping that our de- 
scendants will acknowledge their indebtedness to us for their 
deliverance from cholera, from yellow fever, from diphthe- 
ria, and from typhus. 

The immortal Jenner taught us how to ward off smallpox 
Pasteur, the glory of our times, to render innocuous the 
bites of mad animals.^ * '^ Lister, that benefactor of 
humanity, warding off those germs which poison and ren- 
der fatal the wound where they find lodgment. 

Bacteriology is the hope of hygiene both now and for the 
future. 

Lister, in 1867, enunciated his theory as follows: "But 
inasmuch as the experiments of Pasteur have shown that 
the air does not derive its deleterious properties from oxy- 
gen, or any other gaseous elements, but from certain in-" 
ferior organisms which it holds in suspense, it occurs to me 
that it would be possible to prevent the putrefaction of 
wounds by excluding air from them, and treating them 
with substances destructive to the particles which float about 
in the atmosphere." 

Such was the beginning of antiseptical surgery, which in 
tw-enty-five years, has revolutionized the whole practice of 
surgery. * "^ * So in reference to disinfection. 

Just as in practising laparotomy, in order to enjoy the 
security that septic peritonitis, shall not supervene, and 
snatch away our patient, it behoves us not only to know 
that aseptics and antiseptics are useful, but to have under- 
gone a lower course of practice in their use, and acquired 
an absolute mastery over all the details of the operation. 
So in the case of disinfection, we must become familiar with 
our weapons, and learn how to wield them with the same 
precision as in surgery, has been attained by such men as 
Lister, Billroth, Volkman, Bergmann, and their compeers, 
v:ho are indebted to the system of disinfection for their 
most signal triumphs in the performance of difficult surgi- 
cal operations. 



DqKviiiaent of Health. 99 

The address was most able and most gracious in its wel- 
come. Our space forbids furib.er quotation. 

A fine address of w(!lcome followed from Mayor Gonte- 
reras, and then President Formento gave an interesting 
sketch of the progress of hygiene. 

In England the rates of mortality in two hundred years, 
had been reduced from a ratio per 1000 of 80 to 17, due to 
the enforcement of the acts on sanitary matters in England. 
There had been an immense deal of work done over the 
world in the past ten years, in the limitation of disease, and 
immense results had folio^ved in the great diminution of 
death. 

Dr. Formento in closing said that this was the first Inter- 
national Health Congress held on this side of the Atlantic. 
As such it is' our duty to unravel the problem of yellow 
fever, which is the only obstacle to the much desired com- 
mercial, social and intellectual intercourse between our re- 
spective countries and nations. Yellow fever is the curse and 
drawback of America's Southern climes. If this meeting 
should successfully devise the means of stamping it out for- 
ever from all parts of the continent it vv^ould richly deserve the 
blessings of future generations. '*'■ * * He closed with 
an eloquent tribute to the progress of the Eepublic of 
Mexico and noted the courtesy and refinement of its 
inhabitants. Viva ]\Iexico. 

The great audience dispersed wdiile listening to the beau- 
tiful music of the National anthem of the Republic of 
Mexico. 

The Wednesday morning session was opened by a paper 
by Dr. R. M. Sw^eringen, Health Officer of Texas, on the 
sanitary relations of Mexico and Texas. 

He said that smallpox was constantly crossing the border 
from Mexico into Texas; last year there were 1,903 cases 
in Texas and 464 deaths. Hospital expenses costing 
8150.000. In San Antonio in 1891 and 1892 there had 
been 1,109 cases and 300 deaths, costing §19,545, and very 
little was being done m Mexico to stop this dreadful disease. 
In^ipection of all trains from I\Iexico was had in Mexico, and 



100 Mayor Fldrn's Annual Ilcvmu. 

protests were entered and made by Signior Romero, repre- 
senting i\iexico. 

Dr. Sweringen suggested that a sanitary treaty be en- 
tered into ; there was at present constant trouble between 
the two countries. The matter was referred to American 
Public Health Association Dr. Plunkett offered resolu- 
tions recommending to the General Government' of the 
United States that Hygiene be taught as a part of the curri- 
culum of studies at West Point i\Iilitary Academy. This 
was adopted. 

Dr. Liceaga, President of the Supreme Board of Health 

of the Republic of Mexico, then read an able article on the 

defence of the ports and frontier cities of Mexico against the 

epidemic of cliolera that invaded Europe and was on the 

-. point of invading the United States this year. 

i Great precautions were taken and the most stringent rules 

and regulations put in force. 
\ ' . For all international subjects the States of Mexican 

[; union form only one. The ports and frontier cities directly 

I depend on the Federation. 

The Minister of State forms the sanitary staff with this 

;, object ; on this stall' depends the Boards of Health and Sani- 

f ' tary counsels of each port and frontier city presided over by 

' a delegate named by the Government, who also names the 

number of agents necessary in case ef epidemic. A number 

of stringent orders were issued from the Department of the 

I' Interior, copies of which were given to the members. 

■ They were carefully and exactly drawn up, and very full 

in detail. 

Mexico certainly took every precaution as to cholera. 
Dr. Carmona, S. Valle read a paper on '* Yellow Fever." 
Dr. Carmona took up the researches of Dr. Sternberg, 
the distinguished Bacteriologist of the United States, in his 
researches for the microbe of yellovv' fever, and his failure 
to do so. 

Dr. Sternberg's great practice in these kinds of labors, and 
his learned knowledge in bacteriology, have not been sufn- 
cient to find out in yellov/ fever any micro organism vyith 



Depart))} en f of fhoUh. 101 

special characteristics that miglit distinguish it from those 
ahcaJy kuowii. Dr. Carmona said tliat he proposed to 
leave the highway of invesiigatio]i, and take a long and 
winding and narrow path. He begged to fix attention to a 
symptom so peculiar to yellow fever, that in all 
languages it is called yellow fever. He claimed that this 
yellow coloring was due to the presence in the organism 'of 
a particular substance that he called. " Icteroidina." It is 
not due to the presence of bile in the blood. 

If we defecate a bilious urine however dyed it may be, 
by acetatum of lead, we will have a colorless liquid. On 
the contrary, the urine of a patient yellowed by the 
yellow fever, submitted to the same experiment will always 
have a straw-yellow liquid that will never become colorless. 
The coloring principle of this liquid is v/hat I call ''Icte- 
roidina.'' 

- To obtain this, the urine must be, first, defecated by pre- 
cipitation through acetatum of lead ; second, the precipitate 
must be carefully washed, and lastly a current of carbonic 
acid must be made to pass through so as to decompose the 
acetate ; after filtering and washing it again it must be left 
to spontaneous eviiporation ; we then obtain a substance of 
the consistency of thick honey and of a yellow color, in- 
soluble in alcohol, in sulphuric ether or chloroform, but 
very soluble in water, to which it imparts a straw-yellow 
coloration, very much like that of yellow fever patients. 
He exhibited a specimen, and said that the clearing this 
substance up would shed a light on the pathogeny of the 
disease. He then described a micro organism always 
present, which presented peculiarities only found in yellow 
fever patients. 

These microbions will acquire relatively colossal propor- 
tions, if taken out and deposited in a solution of potash 
salt. These microbions do not die with the patient, but 
grow and impart a more intense color to a patient dying of 
yellow fever. Therefore, as this disease is called yellow 
fever in all countries on account of the yellow coloring, and 
is so marked as to give a characterization to the disease, 



l:.M m '' 



102 Mayor Ficl:en\'^ Amiiial Timeio. 

and as this Jiueisciue to the product of the micro organism, 
then ililij mici oigauism has much to do with tlie patho- 
gen}^ of yellow fever. 

Dr. Carmona exhibited specimens of a bright golden 
yellow color; great mavSses of these microbions which I saw 
through the microscope. Although examining and studying 
many forms of hepatic schivius, he said that it was only 
in yellow fever that these specimens could be found. Re- 
capitulation. 

A micro organism seen in the urine of the diseased, 
mixed with many others, we find it conglomerated in the 
liver ; this gives us the wdierefore of the yellow coloration in 
the disease ; and explains to us the formation of black vomit, 
and accounts for the pathological alterations in the liver 
and kidneys, and explains the given phenomena of 
pyrexia or fever. It deserves attention from observers, and 
not contempt, because it bears a certain resemblance to other 
forms of microbions already known. 

A short paper was then read by Dr. Augustin Reyes, on 
the " Prophylaxis of Hydrophobia in Mexico.^' 

Dr. Pasteur said in Paris before the Academy of Science, 
in February, 1884 : " Cannot human skill avail itself of the 
long period of incubation of hydrophobia, so as to reach the 
refractory state of the persons bitten, in the space of time 
which occurs before the symptoms of hydrophobia shew 
themselves." 

In October, 1885, he made one of his experiments on 
animals, and a boy named Meister, bitten by a mad dog. 

These facts becoming knovyn, many nations hastened to 
institute establishments to utilize these discoveries. 

Mexico followed them, and Dr. Liceaga, having brought 
the virus from the Paris institution, the first inoculation 
w^as made on the 23rd of xA.pril, 1888. 

From that date up to the present time, 659 persons have 
been inoculated, w^ith only three unfortunate cases. 

The afternoon session, Wednesday, November 30, was 
opened with a paper from Dr. Juan Ramivez de Arillano, 
on Croup in the ('ity of Mexico. He gave a most graphic 



Ki?'q4> 



Deparlmcnt of IhaUh, 103 

accoiml of tliis disease, showing that its origin dated from 
thu ]iiO.;l iciiioU' period. He said he spoke of the infeetious 
specific disease — Laryngeal Diplithcria — known and de- 
scribed 592 years before the Christian era. Described later, 
50 years after the birth of Christ, by Aratheus, of Cappa- 
docia, and so through the ages to the present time; and 
gave the remarkable fact that until the invasion of Mexico 
b}^ the French, in 1862, the disease was unknown in that 
country. It has since then become naturalized, and deaths 
are registered every year. 

Quoting from Dr. Jansens, for 1883, he said that there were 
2,917 deaths in one year in Berlin ; Paris, 1,916 ; and Madrid 
1,070 ; .Mexico, 60. It would seem that the climate is not par- 
ticularly suitable to the disease, for if it prevailed in jMexico 
as it prevailed in Paris, in a statistical table of ten years there 
should have died 11,851 ; whereas, only 586 died. He said 
that tlie Bacillus of Diphtheria, quoting from Messrs. 
Ronx and Yersin, is only found in false membrane, and 
never in the organs or in the blood. 

As to the practical question of limiting the disease, after 
noting the ordinary precautions to be taken of isolation in 
the house, suggested that there should be a red flag at the 
entrance of every house where there was a case of diph- 
theria ; all articles used should be disinfected in boiling 
water with bicr^rbonate of soda ; all rags and sponges to be 
burnt, etc., etc. 

Dr. Mark W. Harrington, Chief of Weather Bureau at 
Washington, then read a paper on the Relations of the 
Official Weather Service to Sanitary Science. He made 
some valuable suggestions in these respects, that the mete- 
orology of the country should be used to a greater extent 
in hygiene. The Association organized a committee for 
this purpose, with Dr. Baker, of Michigan, as Chairman. 

Dr. Nicholas R de Arellano then read a paper on Exan 
tliematic Typhus, Etiology and Prophylaxis. He gave the 
astounding facts to us that during the year 1891, 1,045 
deaths had occurred in the City of Mexico, and in 21 years, 
from 1869 to 1839,'! 2,372 deaths had occurred ; during that 



104 Mriijor Ficl'cn^^ ybmitnl Review. 

period in the City of Charleston, but 13 deaths liavc oc- 
curred irom Typhus lever. 

He said that Exanthematic Petechial Typhus was en- 
demic in the City of i^Iexico, and prevailed throughout a 
very extensive zone in the Eepublic of Mexico endemically. 
It belongs to the class of infectious or contagious diseases, 
about which bacteriolo<^ical studies have but little ad- 
vanced. The germs are susceptible of development as 
well in the organisn^ as out of it, and it is important to fix 
which are the natural means that act as vehicles for its cul- 
ture, aflbrding the necessary conditions, or those most 
favorable for contagion to take place. 

He gave it as his opinion that one of the most favorable 
mediums in those localities Vvuth climateiic and tellurical 
conditions, favorable to the developm.ent of the Typhus 
germs, is to he found in the foecal matters in decomposition, 
to such a degree that their stagnation in the town sewers, 
house conduits and water closets, must be considered as an 
eminent danger. 

He gave an instance of an epidemic in a school in Mexico, 
in March 1882, that only attacked the boys', and not the 
girls' and old people's departments — the boys having their 
sleeping apartments fronting the closets, in damp and badly 
ventilated rooms. 

After all the f.?ecal matter had been removed and proper 
water closets put in, the epidemic abated and has not reap- 
peared. Again, in another case, the correctional school, 
the same facts occurred. The disease prevails more exten- 
sively in the rainy season, and decreases in July, August, 
September and October and November. In the abundance 
of water, a part, at least, of the fsecal matter is carried off, 
and the rest more or less covered with water, thus retard- 
ing decomposition, and covering the germs also, the disease 
does not propagate itself among persons who enjoy some 
comfort and dwell in ample and well- ventilated apartments, 
and it is very common amongst the poor people who are 
obliged to live in the same apartment where the patient is. 

At the Juarez Hospital wliere tlie disease is always pre- 



Department of JTcalili. 105 

sent, as a large number are treated there ; many of the 
doctors, liaises, etc., contract it. In private practice tlie 
doctors do not commonly take the disease. 

Dr. Charles Smart, U. S. Army Surgeon, read a paper on 
malarial fever, and gave some interesting facts as to govern- 
ment posts, where the disease prevailed extensively. As 
long as poor water was afforded, with the boring of Artesian 
wells and ice machines for keeping the water constantly 
cool, the disease abated and but few cases occurred. 

There was no morning session on Thursday, the time 
being taken to witness the inauguration of President Por- 
firio Diaz, at the Cliamber of Deputies. The building was 
packed ; foreign ministers attired in gorgeous gilt trim- 
mings, etc. 

The streets through v/hich he i assed from his residence 
on Cadena street, to the Chamber of Deputies, were lined 
on each side with troops, and he was escorted by a body of 
cavalry. The ceremony occupied but a fevv^ minutes, the 
oath of office being administered by the President of the 
Supreme Court of the nation. - 

The Republic seems to require a firm hand and certainly 
has got it, but while the reins are held tightly, the impres- 
sion gained on me that great liberality was given to the 
promotion of scientific pursuits, and every effort is made, 
where- no political point is involved, to foster and improve 
the enlightenment of the country. 

In the afternoon of Thursday, Dr. Durgin, of Boston,- 
read a report from the Committee on Immigration, empha- 
sizing the report of 1890, recommendatory of procedures to 
be taken by the vessels for the United States at the ports of 
departure, where they should be cleaned and purified before 
clearing. 

The laws should be so made as to protect ' Canada, the 
United States and Mexico. 

The Committee was continued with a resolution adopted 
to request them to urge on Congress the adoption of such ' 
I laws. ■• . 

Dr. Liceao-a offered a resolution that a committee, with- 



lOG Mayor Ficken's Annual Picvicw, 

Dr. Formento as chairman, should be appointed to take 
iuUy cj.i.vlJ jiaLloit the protection of the country against 
yellow fever, and to keep oiit yellow fever, and to consult 
as to the most opportune method to stop yellow fever when 
present. Committee of seven — Dr. Horlbeck was appointed 
on this committee. 

Dr. Chacon then read a paper on the prevention of " Oph- 
thalmia Neonatorum," and spoke of the great loss not only 
to the individual, but the loss to the State, where an infant 
becomes blind at birth, mostly due to 

1st. Gonorrhcea, and 

2d. To Purulent Ophthalmia, 

It has been estimated that Prussia alone loses 8,000,000 
marks a year, about two million dollars, from this affection. 
The prophalaxis consists in diminishing or causing to dis- 
appear the gonorrhcea of the mother, and 

2nd. In preventing the spread of the disease in the infant 
suffering from purulent ophthalmia, by blowing iodoform 
in an impalpable pov/der under the half opened eyelids of 
the infant. 

Codes of health should require midwives to report all 
such cases, so that free domiciliary visits might be paid from 
free Dispensaries. 

Dr. Hoyt of St. Paul gave an interesting report of the 
disposal of garbage in that city. xVll the carts carried their 
contents to a railroad depot and the garbage of the city was 
carried out into the country 8 or 10 miles away. 

He suggested that more care should be taken as to the 
receptacles kept on the sidewalk, and said that they should 
be uniform and made for the purpose. 

Dr. Ruiz then read a paper on "Endemic and Epidemic 
diseases of the ports of entry of the Mexican Gulf.^' 

Ho described the Gulf coast of Mexico as being 2,300 
kilometres in length. Low, sandy and swampy— with 
lagoons running parallel with the sea — there are nine ports 
of entries in the following order from north to south, Mata- 
moras, Tampico, Tuxpan, Vera Cruz. Coatza Coalcos, 
Frontera, Carmen Island, Campeche, Progresso. They were 



Dcparimcnl of Ilcalili. ' 107 

very unhealthy, with a liigh rate of mortality. Paludous 
Ui liUAiiuicti fever aud vellow fevci seeiiiud to be continually 
prevalent, always malarial fever, sometimes cholera. 

He recommended that these cities be cleansed at any cost 
and that proper quarantine regulations should be enforced 
with due regard to the enormous sanitary interests of the 
two Republics, the United States of America and United 
States of Mexico, from the more or less constant presence 
of yellow fev6r~-it is evident that the restrictions on 
vessels from these ports are justified— yellow fever was 
present at Cordova in December while we were in Mexico 
an inland town 66 miles from the coast. 

He said the three most important necessities were to 
1st drain the ground, 2nd to give proper and efiicient sys- 
tems of sev\^erage, and 3rd to provide proper drinking water. 

'"The Sanitary Boards in the ports will be composed of 
one medical man who shall be appointed by the Sec. of the 
Interior on Nominations from the Supreme Board, and who 
will act as president of his local Board, of the captain of 
the port, and of the persons who may be appointed by the 
City Council of the locality, and who are accepted by the 
Governor of the State or political chief of the Territory." 

The night being Inauguration night v/as celebrated by a 
grand display of fireworks and band playing on the grand 
plaza containing 15 acres and filled with an immense 
throng of people. The cathedral v/as beautifully illuminated. 

At the Friday morning session. 

Dr. Gihon offered resolutions. 

That a national service of health be established for the 
United States of America, and in the light of its necessity 
that a committee of thirteen be appointed to secure uni- 
formity of action and approval of Congress for this purpose. 

Dr H. B: Horlbeck was appointed on this .committee. 

Dr. \Yalcott from Committee on National Legislation re- 
ported and suggested that a National Bureau of Health be 
established of different sections. 



108 Mayor Fichenh Ammial Revicio. 

1. Division of vital statistics and mortalities. 

8. Bacteriology. 

4. Interstate aid to restrain disease from one locality to 
another. 

5. National quarantine. 

Responsible head to preside over this department of the 
government. 

Resolutions adopted. 

Dr.- Ramviez read a paper on the water supply of the 
City of Mexico which comes from Chapultapec, Santa Fe 
from Guadaioupe and from 483 artesian wells, the latter 
characterized bv perfect transparency and by absence of 
organic matter. 

An election for ofHcers was held by the Advisory Council 
this, Friday afternoon, resulting in the choice of Dr. S. H. 
Durgin, of Boston, as President, and Dr. Leceaga, of Mex- 
ico, as 1st Vice-President, Dr. Lachapeele, of Canada, as 2d 
President. 

Dr. Septien read a paper on the Importance of Hygiene, 
and sjjoke of health as the greatest of temporal benefits 
that man can enjoy. Two great truths are made manifest : 
If we cannot cure the uAimerical majority of diseases, we 
can certainly prevent lliem. 

Curation has given place to prevention ; Therapeutics to 
Hygiene. But a few days ago a striking proof of the above 
has been shown by the United States and England in pre- 
venting cholera, London, the most populous city in the 
world, is the most healthy city, mortality is only 17 per 
annum per 1000. The population of England duplicates 
itself in 54 years. Man should only die of old age. Hy- 
giene, just born in this century, is already showing and 
bearing fruit in abundance. A Sanitar}^ Department for 
the United States would represent the medical conscience 
of the nation, and would enlighten the people in all that 
relates to salubrity. Tliis essay closed the reading of papers. 



Department of lleaUh. 109 

A solemn closing session was held at the Theatre Na- 
cionale on l^'rida}^ night, and fareAvell addresses and ad- 
dresses of tlianks were presented for the unbounded and 
magnificent hospitality which has marked this session of 
the American Public Health Association in the City of 
Mexico. 

On Saturday a most interesting excursion was had for 
the Association. A train of ten cars had been provided, 
and about four hundred guests went out to see the new 
canal which is being dug for the removal of the sewerage 
of the City of Mexico, and the drainage of the Valley of 
Mexico. This was quite an undertaking, and consumed au 
entire day, our party leaving at the very early hour of 6.30 
o'clock A. iVi., and returning about the same hour in the 
evening. 

. We went along the banks of the canal, and got to the 
outer tunnel opening in the mountains. The canal through 
the plain is to be about thirty miles, and through the 
]nountain, by tunnel, about seven miles; it is a gigantic 
undertaking, to cost about §12,000,000, and to be finished 
in September, 1894. 

Many projects have been had, and many efforts made to 
effect this most important necessity, viz : The drainage of 
the Valley of ^Mexico. The work has been really com- 
menced in 1885. 

The project has two objects : 

1st. To receive the surplus waters and sewage of the City 
of Mexico, and carry them outside of the valley. 

2d. To control the entire waters of the Valley, affording 
an outlet when found necessary. 

The canal has a depth of about IS feet, (5.50 m.) which 
in the last few kilometres is increased to 20.50 m., (about GQ 
feet, width at bottom, from 5 to 6 m., about IS to 20 feet. 
The canal will carry about 18 cubic M. per second. The 
tunnel will be lined with brick in the upper part, and where 
the water will run, with artificial stone, made of sand and 
Portland cement. 



110 Alayor Fickeiis Annual Review. 

The work of the canal is beiiig carried out in two differ- 
ent manners: by hand work for tlie first part of the deptli 
and by means of enormously powerful Couloir dredges, 
which have a capacity of 3,000 cubic metres of excavation 
per day ; five of these dredges are at work, and they can 
excavate to a depth of twenty metres. 

As soon as finished it is expected to put down a proper 
modern system of sewerage pipes. 

On Sunday the Association were invited to a reception at 
the palace of Chapultapec by President Diaz. The mem- 
bers were each personally introduced to the President, and 
then they inspected the magnificent view of the Valley of 
Mexico, presented from this height about 150 feet above the 
city. Looking down on us and towering above were the 
magnificent volcanos Papocatapetl^ 17,784 feet above the sea, 
and Iztaccihuatl, 15,705 feet above the sea. The scene was 
most enchanting, and enlivened by music from a grand 
military band of 150 musicians. It is a most interesting 
spot; and has been famous in tragedy first known to us in 
Monteczumas' time, when the conquest of the country by 
Spain occurred m 1521. 

A sumptuous banquet vv^as provided. 

On Monday, December 5th, I left for Charleston, and ar- 
rived after 5,000 miles of travel. The twentieth meeting: 
of the American Public Health Association was character- 
ized b}^ great enthusiasm and constant interest. 

At the suggestion of Mr. Hall T. McGee, Chairman Mari- 
time Sanitation Committee, a pamphlet containing the ex- 
periments of Dr. Eugene Wasden, Professor of Pathology 
of Medical College, State of South Carolina, was prepared. 
This report embodies every test of 12 different species of 
Microbes, submitted to the temperature of 230° in the 
steam cylinder, and showing entire lethal effect on all va- 
rieties embracing Bacillus Anthracis, Bacillus Indicus, 3 
specimens of Bacillus of Sewer Mud, St. Pyogenes Albus 
Scereus, B. Subtilis, Mesenter,Typhi xVbdom, B. Coli Com., B. 
Cholara^ Asiatic^e, all destroyed with spores except Bacillus 
Subtilis, the most resistant germ known. 



rf 



Dcparimcni of lleaWt. Ill 

Tliis pamphlet was distributed among the members of 

• the American Public Health Association, and was received 

v/ith evidences of great satisfaction as indicating the tlior- 

I f- ough capacity of the Charleston plant at quarantine to de- 

^ ■ stroy all dangerous microbes aboard ships entering the 

port. Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. IIORLBECK, M. D, 
Health Officer and Secretary. 



1.12 Mayor Ficken^s Annual Review. 

REPORT OF TIDAL DRAIN KEEPER. 

Charleston, Jan'y 1, 1803. 

To his Honor the Mayor and Aldermen of Ch.arleslon : 

Gentlemen : I ha,ve the honor to submit to your bpnor- 
able Board the proceedings of this Department for tlie 
past year : 

Appropriation for Tidal Drain Department $4,000 00 

To Juo. F. Riley, for rei)airing windlass and 

Battery gate $ 34 42 

" Sieinmeyer Lumber Co., lumber for building 

tanks and sandpit covers 47 41 

*' John HefjTon, repairing truck axles '. 6 00 

" E. Roe^^sler & Son, for hardware, etc G3 SS 

" Jno. E. Beard, for lamps used in drains 3 50 ^ 

" Thos. Hughes, for cement, gravel and lime... 4 25 

'' Daggett Printing Co., for blank pay rolls...... 5 75 

'; T, F. McGarey, for tilling up sandpit 9 00 

'' Pay Rolls for cleaning out drains and for (2) 

two hands for year 2,826 99 

•' Tidal Drain keeper's salary for one (1) year... 1,000 00 

—- 4,000 00 



Yours truly, JNO. E. KOESTER, 

Tidal Drain Keeper. 



Depart nienl of CJiariiics. 113 



DEPARTMENT OF ClIAmTIES. 



rn 



THE CHARLESTON ORPHAN HOUSE. 

To the lion. John F. Fickcn^ Mayor, 

of Charleston, S. C: 

Sir,— -I have the honor to submit the following annual 
report, viz : 

From the Committee on School, Library, Purveyance and 
Supervision, and Committee on Binding Out, with state- 
ment shovving Receipts and Expenditures of the Institution 
for the past fiscal year, 1892, up to December 3lst, inclu- 
sive, with annexed statement of the Commissioners Trust 
Fund. 



BECEIPTS, 

Amount received from interest on Public Fund $ 8,984 24 

Amount received from Commissioners' Trust Fund 2,481 69 

Balance from City Treasury 12,861 08 

$24,277 01 



EXPENDITURES. 

Amount expended from Public Fund as per Monthly Re- 
turns to City Council $19 645 32 

Amount expended by City Treasurer for Physician's 

salary 700 00 

Amount expended for 5 years' insurance on House 1,500 00 

Amount expended from Commissioners' Trust Fund, as 

per return to City Council 2,431 69 

E. E. $24,277 01 

E. MONTAGUE GRIMKE, 
> i^ccrctary C. O. If. 

8 



114 Mayor Fickcnh Amiv/.d Ileview. 

THE CO.MMiTTEE ON SCHOOLS. 

The Committee on Schools present the subjoined annual 
report : 

Highest number on register during the year : 

Boys, 124— Girls, 115— Total 2c^9 

Average attendance : 

Boys, 116— Girls, lOS—Totai 224 

Admitted : 

Boys, 24— Girls, 27--Total 51 

Discharged : 

Boys, S7-Girls, 23— Total 59 

The sessions of the School have been conducted punctu- 
ally and regularly throughout the year. 

There has been an unusually large number of children 
discharged since the last report, and a correspondingly 
large number admitted ; 90 per cent, of the latter being un- 
able to read, were assigned to the Kindergarten. In June, 
a class of 2B was promoted from this department, but it is 
still crowded, numbering 85. 

Of the first class, only 6 remain ; while pursuing certain 
studies, these assist in the School, and in various depart- 
ments of the House. 

The branches taught embrace Reading, Writing, Orthog- 
raphy, Arithmetic, (mental and practical,) Common School 
and Physical Geography, Ancient and Modern History, 
Familiar Science, Grammar, Physiology, Book-Keeping, Ste- 
nography, Vocal and Instrumental ]\Iusic. Especial impor- 
tance is attached to dictation exercises, and to exercises 
designed to cultivate the habit of attention, and the conse- 
quent ability to reproduce what has been presented to the 
mind. The success attending the efforts of the teachers in 
this direction, has been very marked. The larger boys 
and girls are required every Monday, to write an abstract 
of the sermon heard in the Chapel the previous afternoon, 
while the younger children are questioned by their teach- 
ers ; the results indicate that they v/ere attentive, and not 
forgetful *' Hearers of the Word." 



Dcpojriineat oj Charities. JJ5 

The Committee would speak in terms of special commen- 
dation of the accurate and full reports made by pupils of 
the School, of a lecture on Mexico, delivered by Dr. Buist, 
after his return from a trip to that country. Scarcely a 
point made by the speaker was omitted from the reports 
presented, and, in many instances, the exact langua^^e was 
reproduced. In these reports the spelling and punctuation 
were uniformly good, and tliere v/ere very few mistakes in 
graDimar. It should be added that the pupils did not 
know until after the lecture, that they would be asked to 
re'port it. 

The illness last spring of the teacher of Stenography and 
Type Writing, caused an interruption in the studies of the 
class mentioned in last report, but one of the graduates 
carried on a class till the close of the School in July. 

The music and physical exercises of the School, are very 
interesting features, and continue to attract numbers of 
visitors on reception days. The Rev. Dr. Lander, Presi- 
dent of Williaraston Female College, visited the School in 
November, and Avas so pleased that he offered a year's board 
and tuition to any girl the Principal might select. 

The exercises on Columbus Day, were very creditable ; 
several of the Commissioners with their families and other 
friends were present. At the close, Dr. Buist and Mr. 
Dibble made some appropriate remarks. 

A Thanksgiving Service of suitable recitations and 
anthems, was also very beautifully rendered by the children. 

The Committee cannot conclude this report, without 
specially referring to Miss A. K. Irving, the faithful Super- 
intendent of this Institution. Miss Irving has been Princi- 
pal of the School for thirty-eight consecutive years, devoting 
the best portion of her life to organizing the School, and 
placing it on its present satisfactory basis. During this 
long period of anxious and arduous toil, her thoughtful 
care and vigilance have known no abatement. 

The zeal and devotion of the teachers are manifested in 
the progress of their pupils in all the branches of educa- 
tion, to which reference has been made. Both the Princi- 



116 Mayor Fichrts Annual Ilccicw. 

pal and teachers work in entire harmony, in making the 
Orphan House, in all its departments, the pride of 
Charleston. GEO. "\V. WILTJAMS. 

FRANCIS J. PIDLZER. 
VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
J. S. BULST, M, D. 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY. 

The Committee on Library report that the Library con- 
tains 3,329 volumes. There has been added during the 
year, 104 Periodicals and 16 Books. The children have 
drawn out and read during the year 2,976 volumes. 

The children continue to take o^reat interest in reading, 
and the librarian has discharged her duties v/ith fidelity. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. H. DeLEON. 
JAS. M. EASON. 
VIRGIL C. DIBBLE. 
Charleston, January 5, J 893. 

THE BINDING OUT COMMITTEE. 

Charleston, December 31st, 1892. 
The Binding Out Committee present the following as 
their report for the year : 

3?bere have been admitted to the House : 

Boys, 19— Gh'ls, 34— Total...: -53 

There have been discharged : 

Boys, 36— Girls, 20— Total... 56 

Of those discharged, 29 boys and 17 girls, (total 46,) were given to 
relatives who applied for them. The others were bound out as fol- 
lows : 

To be Farmers 3 Boys. 

To be a Druggist 1 Boy. 

To be a Printer .....1 " 

To be a Stone-cutter 1 *' 

To bea Sailor 1 *' 

To Domestic Service 3 Girls. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
GEO. H. TUCKER, 
T. G. MAIN, 

Binding Out Committee. 



Departmenl of Charities. 117 

KFPOKT O^^ THE COMMITTEE ON PLKVEYANCE, CHARLESTON 
ORPHAN HOUSE. 

The Committee ou Purveyance beg leave to submit their 
Annual Report of Expenditures for the Cliarleston Orphan 
House, for the year ending December 31st, 1892 : 

LBS, COST. 

Fresh Meat 26,424 $1,511 91 

Bacon, hams and other salt meats 5,935f 553 23 

Coffee 271 .53 05 

Cocoa Shells 1,354 69 48 

Rice 5,921 2G5 54 

Butter 1,251 327 76 

Cottolene 606^ 51 08 

Tea 16 15 05 

Sugar 2,056 96 83 

Molasses 421| gals. 173 56 

Flour 16 bbls. SS 00 

Irish Potatoes 34 bbls 1 bag. 82 25 

Sweet Potatoes.... 37^- bbls. 45 45 

Bread 54,463 loaves. 1,497 75-$ 4,830 94 

Expense of cows furnishing 3,273i gals, milk 6-51 60 

Corn and Peas, 148 11-20 bushels 135 73 

Small Groceries 445 40 

Soap, Starch, etc , 105 60 

Grist 50S bushels, Meal 174i bushels 438 97 

Fuel, Wood and Coal 917 70 

Clothing, House Linen, Hat^s and Shoes... 3,348 81 

Books, Stationery, etc 199 88 

Medicines, Carbolic Soap, Disinfectants, etc.............. 188 18 

House Furnishing, Garden Seeds, etc 397 45 

Salaries and Labor 5,427 23 

Incidental expenses, such as Vegetables, Picnic, Officers' 
Tables, Extra for Sick and other small items, too nu- 
merous to mention 1,006 25 

Repairs 2,206 84 

Insurance on Boiler 75 00 



$20,375 58 



It will be seen that the expense of clothing this year is 
much higher than last, winter suits for both boys and girls 
having to be purchased this year, while the Centennial suits 
of 1890 were made to do duty for 1891. 



t 



118 Mayor Ficken^s Amiv.al Picview, 

All other expenditures, outside of repairs, are below last 
vcars ii^Qies. 

The garden, under the supervision of the engineer, has 
done remarkably well. The following is the list of vegeta- 
bles it has furnished : 

1,403 bunches Carrots, 6 dozen Mangoes, 

708 bimclies Beets, 92 dozen Squash. 

318 bunches Radishes, 3 barrels Irish Potatoes, 

161 bunches Turnips, 1 peck Spinach, 

42 bunches Onions, 5| bushels Okra, 

155 bunches Leeks, 3| bushels Tomatoes, 

46 dozen Cabbages, * 29^} bushels Snapbeans, 

62^ dozen Lettuce, If bushels Green Peas, 

34 dozen Green Corn, 6 Muskn^elons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAS. M. EASON, 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS, 

T. A. WILBUR, Committee. 



THE COMMITTEE ON EETKENCHMENT. 

The Committee on Retrenchment and Reform would 
report, that in their opinion, the management of the Insti- 
tution is as economically conducted as possible, and have 
nothing to suggest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. A. WILBUR. 
Charleston, S. C, Jan, 5, 1893, . H. H. DeLEON. 



Committee on Chapel. 

Religious services were held in the Chapel every Sunday 
afternoon last year, and v/ere conducted by our resident 
Protestant clergyman except on four occasions when Bishop 
Hendrix and Rev. Coke Smith, Bishop Duncan and Rev. 
Mr. Moreland officiated. 






P f . Department of Charities. 119 

The CominissioiiGrs beg to tender their thanks for these 
r.cccp!r,b^o services, which have been in every instance elieer- 
fully granted. 
, ,, Our services are usually largely attended by our citizens 

{, I whom we are always very glad to welcome. 

- f The music of the chapel continues to be a very attractive 

I I feature of our services. 

I I' Respectfully submitted,' 

B. A. MUCKENFUSS. 
• J. S. BUIST. 

T. A. WILBUR. 
Charleston, S. C, Jan 8, 1893. 



REPORT OF THE SEWING DEPARTiMENT. 



The Report of the Sewing Department, which in addition 

to general seamstress v/ork, includes tailoring and dress- 
making. 

Boys Winter Suits 126 

*• Summer " 243 

Worsted Dresses 105 

Calico ** 179 

Boys and Girls Under Garments 600 

Aprons 239 

Calico Shirt^s 72 

Pillow Cases 28 

Sheets 81 

Pavilions 126 

Table Cloths, Hemmed 20 

Towels, Hemmed 153 

Handkerchiefs, Hemmed 95 

Girls Hats, Trimmed 130 

Stockings and Socks, Marked 102 prs. 

Handkerchiefs, Marked 442 

Towels '' 200 

Odd Pieces " 78 

Clothing, outgrown by larger children and refitted to 

smaller ones 1,GS0 



120 Mayor Fichen's Annual Picmew. 

Mrs. Mary Maiiiip, who, for fifty-six years, was the head 
o: tl'io Jv;|.cviL)i^^u., Jicd Fvj1>. ISoh, 1S02. The subjoined 
" Tribute of Eespect" shows in wha-t estimation she was 
held. 

Mrs. Mary Manno, who on Thursday, Feb. 18th, 1892, 
entered peacefully into rest, in the 90th year of her age, was 
admitted to tlie Charleston Orphan House, in 1810, and 
spent several years under the fostering care of those at that 
time in charge of its interests. In 1829, after the death of 
her husband, she re-entered the Institution, assuming the 
position of Matron. Since then, she has wuthout interrup- 
tion, been an officer of the House, and for many years was 
in charge of the Sewing Room, superintending the cutting 
and making of the clothino; worn by the boys and girls. 
About two years ago, pressed by the infirmities of age, she 
was compelled to withdraw from regular work, and to trans- 
fer to other hands the trust she had so efficiently discharged 
and which had been to her a labor of love. 

She remained, however, in the House, and her presence 
w^as a blessing and an inspiration to those associated Vv^ith, 
her. ■ 

Few are privileged to spend in active employment more 

than three score years ; very few are so conscientious, as 

habitually to meet during life every demand of duty, and 

■ so unselfish as to find the highest pleasure in doing for. 

others. " 

i\Irs. Manno spent her long life in doing earnestly that 
which her hands found to do, and presented to the girls with 
whom she was in daily contact, an example of patient indus- 
try, and of devotion to duty, by which many have profited 
and wull yet profit. 

No higher praise can one receive than that awarded her 
of whom Jesus said, " She hath doiie what she could." The 
record of Mrs. Manno's life can be summarized in similar 



f words. 



Be it resolved, That in the death of Mrs. Mary Manno, the 
Orphan House has lost a faithful and upright ofiicer, whose 



fl D(^/artmmt of ClLarilies. 121 

life is worthy of imitation, aud whose memory should long 

E'^solvcd, That tliis monoorial be read before the inmates 
• of the House, and that a copy be sent to each of the sur- 

viving grand children of the deceased. 

Extracts from the Minutes of the Commissioners, of the 
Charleston Orphan House, March 3, 1892. 

E. MONTAGUE GRIMKE, 

Secretary. 



111,323 pieces of clothing were laundried during the year. 
Two -women have been employed most of the time — and the 
rest of the work has been done by the girls who are regu- 
larly detailed each week. 

Tv*^o cooks, assisted by the children, prepared the food for 
f 280 children and adults. 

I The older girls, in rotation, take charge of the Teachers' 

^ and Officers' Dining Rooms — -while the others, in addition 

I 'to keeping their dormitories and clothing in order, assist 

I with the younger children, set tables, wash dishes, clean 

knives, etc. ; the boys also assist in milking, take charge of 
the poultry, cut wood, distribute coal, and work in the gar- 
den. All this is accomplished without interfering with their 
educational interests. But one domestic is employed in the 
House, for work which cannot be done by the children. 

The work of the Sunday-School has been carried on with- 
out interruption — but we still find great difficulty in obtain- 
ing teachers. The School is divided into 14 classes, faith- 
fully instructed by two male (Messrs. Knox and Miscally, 
mentioned in last report) and twelve female teachers. The 
exercises begin at 9 o'clock, and are continued a little over 
an hour. The International Sunday-School lessons have 
been given up, and the Union Question Books, published 
by the American Sunday-School Union, (formerly used with 
great profit) have taken their place. 
The general health of the children is indeed remarkable. 
Harry Lee Thompson, aged 10 J years, who came into the 



122 May 07' Fichenh Annual Ueview, 

House, suffering from inalarial poisoning, died jMarch 20tli, 
a^.J w.\o Iiicv-iieJ ill our lot at Magnolia Cemetery. 

In submitting the foregoing complete and interesting 
reports of the Standing Committees of the Board, I desire 
to express my appreciation of the intelligence and earnest- 
ness w^ hi ch have characterized' my associates, in the dis- 
charge of the important duties assigned them. The affairs 
of the Orphan House were never more carefully and 
economically administered, and the Institution has never 
been in a more efficient condition, I would also add my 
testimony to the tribute of the School Committee to the 
faithfulness of the Principal and her corps of assistants. 
They are doing a work which wull be seen and felt in man}' 
a hom.e for years to come — a v/ork for which the entire com- 
munity should be grateful. 

May God's blessing continue to rest upon the Orphan 
House, a refuge to hundreds of children who otherwise 
would be horaeless, and a noble monument in our old City 
to the charity and generosity of our people. 
^Respectfully submitted, 

JACOB SMALL, 
Chairman of the Board, of Commissioners of the Orphan House 






I? 



Departmcrd of Oharitics. 123 

ABSTRACT of the Rcccipfs end Expcndii^ires of the Private 
Fjnid of the Commissioners of the CharlesioR Orphan House 
for the year ending December' jl, 18g^. 



Dr. 

To Balance ou hand January 1, 1892 

To Cash received from interest on investments... 

To Cash from rent of UflerJiardt Farm. 

Legacy of William B. Smith............. 



\ 543 95 

2,598 00 

G2 50 

1,000 00 


$4,204 45 



Cr. 

By Cash paid for Oflieers Salaries, &c $l,84-i 00 

Magnolia Cemetery Co 3160 

Sunday-School Papers 8 70 

Picnic.. 150 05 

Marriage Donation 75 00 

Advertising 1103 

Instruction in Typewriting 30 00 

Funeral Expenses 173 00 

Setting and Erecting Tablets to 

the memory of Donors.... 93 00 

. « Sundries.... .' 20 35—2,43109 

Investments 1,023 00 

Balance 749 76 

$4,204 45 

E.E. 

E. MONTAGUE GRIMKE, Treasure^', 

Examined and found correct. 

J. S. BUIST, 
H. H. DeLEON, for 
■ ■ B. A. MUCKENFUSS, 

^?J ' Committee on Accounts. 



124 Mayor Fkhciis Annual lleeicw. 

LIS'^P of Bonds, Stoch and other Sccnrlties belonoing to the 
FrivaiG Fund of the Commissioners of iJie CJiarleston Or- 
phan House, exhibited to us this day of Jan^ 1893. 

51 Bonds of the City of Charleston 4 per cent $1,000 $51,000 

G Bonds of the City of Charleston 4 per cent... 500 ^ 3,000 

3 Bonds of the City oi Charleston 4 per cent 100 300 

2 Bonds of the Northeastern Railroad Co, 1st iNIort- 

gage 8por cent, of 500 1,000 

1 Certificate of Consolidated Stock of the State of 

South Carolina G per cent, for 4,500 

1 Certificate for 20 shares Magnolia Cemeter^'^ Co. of 

100 eacl) .' 2,000 

1 Certiiicatc for 3 shares in the J^ank of Charleston, 

N. B.A. of lOOeach 300 

1 Title Deed to six lots (G) in Magnolia Cemetery 

1 Certificate of Deposit for one Cha.ileston k Savan- 
nah K. R. Bond 500 

1 Bond of the Savannah and Charleston Railroad Co. 150 

J. S. BUIST, 

H. H. DeLEON, for 

B, A. MUCKENFUSS, 

Conimittee on Accounts. 



Dcpariincnt of Charities. 



125 



SlimEAS DISPENSARY. 

Chakleston, S, C, February 12th, 1893. 

Hon. John F. Ficlcen, Mayor of Charleston : — 

Sir: — I have the honor to transmit herewith, the Finan- 
cial Account of the Shirras' Dispensary ; the detailed Re- 
port of th(3 Physicians' ; a summary of the same, for the 
year, 1892. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. L. BRODIE, M. D., 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Annual Repoijt of CxIses TiiEATED in the Eye, Eak and 

TiTEOAT DepAET^.[EXT OF ShIKRAS' DiSPENSAEi', DLBING 

1S92. 



Number of Patients treated in 1892 138 

Number of Vv'hite Patients treated in 1892 20 

Number of Colored Patients treated in 1892 118 

Number of Eye Patients treated in 1892 ...®. 127 

Number of Ear Patients treated in 1892 JO 

Number of Throat Patients treated in 1892 1 

Total number of Visits paid in 1892 425 



Januaey 1S92, TO Januaey, 1893. 
Department of Diseases of Eye, Ear and Throat. 



Diseases of the Eye. 

Atrophy of Optic Nerve 2 

Amblyopia, Congenital 1 

Blepharitis, Marginalis 3 

Burn of Eye-lids 1 

Cataract 7 

Cellulitis of Eye-lids 1 

Chalazion 1 

Choroiditis 1 

Conjunctivitis, Catarrhal 23 

Conjunctivitis, Phlyctenular.... 3 

Conjunctivitis, Scrofulous 1 

Contusion of Eye -lids 'I 

Cvst of Eye-lids 1 



Episcleritis.. 2 

Eczema of Eye-lids 2 

Glaucoma, Chronic. 

Gumma of Iris 

Hordeolum 

Ply popiom 

I Iritis 1 

I Irido, Cyclitis 

Keratitis 

K erat i t i s, 1 n ters titi al 

Keratitis, Phlyctenular 9 

Kerat i tis, Ulcerous 15 

Leucoma of Cornea 4 

Eupturc of Cornea 1 

Spasm of Accommodation 1 



12G 



Mayor Ficlen's Ayinual Rifview. 



Diseases of tjie Eye. I 

StaplnioDia, Cornea-Ant 2 \ 

Tumor of Eye-lids 1 j 

Xerosis, Conjunctival 1 



Ekboks of Refracting 
Media. 



Astigmatism, Hyperopic 1 

Asligmatism, Mixed 1 

Hyperopia 1 

Myopia 1 



Presbyopia .3 

Is'ot i>iagjiosed iO 

Ear Diseases. 

Deafness, Incurable 5 

Impacted, (jermuen 1 

Catarrh, Eustachian Tubes 2 

Otorrha^a 2 

Stenosis, Eustachian Tube 1 

Tinnitus, Aurium 1 



Diseases of Throat. 
__ Syphilitic Ulcer of Thro at 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN L. DAWSON, Jr., M. D. 
CIIAIILES W. KOLLOCK, M. D. 

OplitJialmic Surgeons. 



Summary of Medical and Surgical Atiendance at Shirras' 

DiSPEXSARY, FOR THE YeAR 1892. 

Dr. j. j. Edwards, Surgery :— 

Number cases treated 17 

Whites 8 

Colored....^: 9 

Dr. p. Ct. DeSaussure, Women and Ceiildren :~ 

Number cases treated 87 

Whites 49 

Colored 38 

Drs. Dawson and Kollock, Eye, Ear and Throat :— 

Numoer cases treated 138 

Whites 20 

Colored 118 

Dk. C. M. Rees, Genito-Urinary Surgery :— 

Number cases treated 13 

Whites 4 

Colored , 9 

Grand Totals 255 

Whites 81 

Colored.... 174 

Visits paid 158 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. L. BRODIE, M. D., 

Secretary/, 



Dqxirtmcnt of Cliariiiea. 127 

Charleston, S. C, January 21st, 1893. 

To the Board Trustees of the Shirr as' Dispensary : — 

Gentlemen : — I beg to submit herevvitli my xVnniial Re- 
port of Patients treated at tlie " Shirras' Dispensary," for 
the year ending .December 81st, 1892. 



1892 " 
Date 


Kesidenoe 


o 
S 




1 


< 


Disease 


Jan. 1 


Kine St 


W 

AV 

c 
c 
c 
c 
w 
c 

c 
c 
c 
c 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

m" 

"m" 


F 


20 


Syphilis 


21 


King St 


Svpbiiis 


9 


Marv St 


il? 


Contracted Meatus 


Feb. 20 


2 Anierica St.... 

Judith St 

162 Queen St... 

13 John St 

S Beresford St.. 
89 Market St.... 
20 Burns' Lane 
6-3 Beaufain St. 

2 Pitt St 

164 Church St.. 


Hydrocele 


Apr. 2 

June 4 

Sep. 6 

27 

Oct 11...... 




12 

6o 

22 
15 
23 
10 

18 


Phimosis and Balanitis. 

Secondary Syphilis 

InliuKi. Spefmat. Cord,.. 

Secondary Syphilis 

Secondary Syphilis... 


11 

13 

Nov. 5 

26...... 


Ulcer of Genital Labia.. 

Secondary Syphilis 

Secondary Syphilis 

Ulcer of Penis 




Total 



.-§ 

> 

6 

i 

2 
21 
3 
1 
3 
1 
o 

2 
1 
1 



41 



Total number treated 13 

Total visits at Dispensary 41 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES M. REES, M. D., 
Surgeon in charge Geniio- Urinary and Venereal Diseases. 



128 



Mayor Fichcii^s Annual Review. 



•Annual Keport for 1892 of the Cases of Diseases of 
Women and CifiLDiiEN Treated at the SiiiKJiAs' .Dis- 
pensary. 







M 






< 


d 




1 

3 




AiHGDO^TlKPtl . 


2 






2 


3 
2 


'""e 







^ 


'7 


Ane-iiiiH ». .. 






12 


Aiitifiexioii 












Tk'OD chi ti.i 


1 


1 




1 


i 


1 
1 


3 


Burns 




1 


CelUiiitirt 


2 

""I 

1 






2 
6 
] 
1 
1 

I 
2 
1 






1 


o 


Cholera Infantum 


3 




3 




^j i ' 


7 
] 


Const i pation 




i!::::::r--i 


9 


Cystitis 








!. 


1 


Dentition...... 


1 
1 


" i 





3 


2| 5 
]l 1 





Di arrh'Xci 




3 


Dysnienorrhoaa 


? 


2 
1 






? 


4 


* Dyspepsic 













9 


Ecze^na 










1 


1 


Fever, Cotb. 




■ 1 





1 






1 


^ 


Fever Mai 






HvEiteria 


J 
2 

4 
1 
1 

I 








■ 

] 
1 










1 








!...._. 


o 


"MBllODriU'^G 






3 

1 






3 

1 


7 


MGiiorrliRiiR 










o 


Jj^cj^r Cervix.. -. ... . 










1 








1 






1 


o 


Ov^jn'itis^ . . 













1 


Peniphlegus 






1 

1 


1 
2 
3 
1 
1 


1 


Pertussns 












1 


9 


Presrnancv 


1 
1 
2 

1 






1 

1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

2 


3 
1 
1 


4 


Puberty 











2 


Prociden tu re 






3 


Slfili"!! n o"! fi -.1 












1 


fScrofula 




1 


1 


2 


1 3 


4 


Retro-Flexion 


3 








1 


Tuberculosis .. 


1 


1 


'" "i 

20 


1 




1 

1 

38 


3 


Vap'initis . ». 




1 


Totals 


34 


8 


7 


49 


10 


8 


87 



*Froni L'terine Disease. 
fOne Death, C. M. I. 

Total number of visits, office 150 

Totiil number of visits, house 40 






Depadment of Charities. 129 

RejpoH of the Surgical .Dejxirtmeni of SJivrras^ Dispensary, 
from 'Marcli^ 1892^ to January Ist, 1803. 



Splinter in fiuger | 1 



B0}l3 *> 

Erysipelas 

Foreign body in throat 

Wart ". 

Lymphadenoma , 

Ulcer....... 

Tumor 1 

Trauma 

Spinal curvature 

Genu Valgus , 

Mastitis ..., 

Keloid 

Adenitis 



Totals 8 9 



Number of Consultations .34 

i ' ' J.J.EDWARDS, 

Surgeon in Charge. 
Charleston, 8, C, January 1st, 1893. 



I 



130 Mayor Fich&iis Annual Utvitvj. 



Dr. Ji. L. Brodie^ SecreiaTy and Treasurer^ in account with 
the Trustees of the Sldrras D{s][)ensa/ry . 



Dr. 
1892. 
Jan'y 1. To balance received from Dr. T. Grange 

Simons % 193 46 

Feb. 2. ■Rentofhouse 100 00 ' 

Feb. 10, Interest on City Bonds 4 percent. $17,000 340 00 

Apl. 30. Rentofhouse!..... 150 00 

July 1. Interest on City Bonds, 4 per cent. $17,000.. 340 00 

Ang. 9. Rentofhouse 150 00 

Nov. 28. Bent of house , 150 00 

^],423 46 

1892. Cr. 

Jan'y 9. J. C. Johnson, Janitor % 8 50 

Feb.' 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 

Feb. 11. Dr. T. Grange Simons 200 00 

Feb. 11. Dr. J. I.Edwards 50 00 

Feb. 11. Dr. Manning Simons 50 00 • 

Feb. 11. Dr. J. L. Dawson, Jr 50 00 | 

Feb. 11. Dr. P. GourdinDeSaiissure. 50 00 I 

Mch. 2. J. C. Johnson, Janitor..... 8 50 

Meh. 7. H. Y\^. Hummel, prescriptions 7 25 

ApL 4. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 

May 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 

May 5. Charles Richardson, repairs, &c 10 00 

June 7. J. C Jolmson, Janitor 8 50 '^ 

June 7. H. AY. Hummel, prescriptions 15 13 I 

July 5. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 

Sept. 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 17 00 

Sept. 1, H.W. Flummel, prescriptions 24 00 

Sept. 24. R. M. :Marshall & Bro., ^-500 City 4 per 

cent. Bonds 425 00 

Oct. 1- W. P, Poulnot, cleansing vault 3 50 

Oct. 4. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 

Oct. 8. Water rent 3 00 

Oct. 25. Bissell & Prescott, gutters, <^c 22 95 

Nov. 4. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 % 

Dec. 3. J. C. Johnson, Janitor 8 50 t 

Dec. 7. H. W. Hummel, prescriptions 2873 | 

$1,041 56 I 

Balance in Bank...! , 381 90 . | 

^1,423 46 f 



Department of Charities. 131 



CITY HOSPITAL. 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

To the Board of Comraissioners^ City Hospital : 

Gentlemen, — The Committee on Finance beg leave to 
submit as their annual report, required under City Ordi- 
nances, tables prepared by the Superintendent from the 
Books of Record in the Hospital: 

Balance due City Treasurer, January 1, 1892 , $ 664 65 

Cost of Hospital for year 1892 20.997 22 

Appropriation for 1892 ..?il7,000 00 

Collections , 2.226 55 

Extra appropriation 2,000 00 

Balance due City Treasurer 435 32 

$21,661 87 §21,661 87 

Balance due City Treasurer Jan. 1, 1891} $435 32 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. W. TAFT, 
Chairman Finance Corn. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT FOR YEAR 1892. 
TABLE A. 

SHOWING PATIENTS AS FREE, PAY AND BY RACE. 



\. 



Free. Pay. Grand 

W. C. Total. VV. C. Total. Total. 
In Hospital, Jan, 1, 1892... 32 61 83 6 7 13 96 

Admitted during year 411 590 1001 83 62 145 1146 

Treated ..443 611 1084 89 69 158 1242 



132 Mayor FicJceiis Annual Reoieiu. 

TABLE B. 

SHOWING PATIENTS DISCHARGED AND DIED DURING YEAR 1892. 



W. C. Total. 

Treated Free and Pay, Table A 532 710 1242 

Discharged 440 523 963 

Died 48 136 184 1147 

EemainiDg in Hospital Dec. 31st, 1892 95 



TABLE C. 

SHOWING PATIENTS REMAINING JANUARY 1ST, 1893. 



W. a Total- 
Free 35 50 85 

Pay 6 4 10 

Grand Totals 41 54 95 



TABLE D. 

SHOWING NATIVITY OF PATIENTS REMAINING JANUARY 1ST, 1893. 



Free. Pay. Total. 

W, C. W. C 

\. City 35 50 3 1 89 

i Berkeley County 12 3 

i Charleston County ... 11 2 

I Foreign ... 1 ... 1 

I _ 

Totals 3b 50 6 4 95 



Deparlmcni of Charities. 



183 



T/VBLE E. 

PATIENTS ADMITTED DUIIINQ YEAK 1892. 
F 

w. 

City 411 

Berkeley County 

Charleston County 

British Consul 

Spanish Consul 

Chas, & Sav. R. R ., 

N. E. R. R 

Clarendon County 

Charleston M. & M. Co.... 
Private Patients , 

Totals 411 690 83 G2 



b"'REE. . 


Pay. 




Total. 


C, 


W. 


C. 




1 590 






^ 1001 


... 


8 


34 


42 




... 


7 


7 


. 


C 


... 


6 


... 


1 


... 


1 


. 


3 


4 


7 


. 


... 


2 


2 


... 


1 




1 




... 


1 


1 




64 


14 


78 



1146 



TABLE F. 

S1£0WING AUTHORITY FOR ADMISSION. 

No. of Patients admitted— Table A 1146 

W. C. Total. 

1st Health Ward 105 101 206 

2nd " " 33 94 127 

3rd " " 50 60 110 . 

4th " " 45 86 131 

5th " '' 32 22 54 

6th '* '• 32 62 94 

Total Wards 295 425 722 _ 722 

Emergency 59 

Police : 180 

Faculty 34 

Mayor 6 

Personal Application 145 

Total 1146 



,L^ir;•r 



134 Mayor Ficlcen^s Annual PiCvieic. ' 

TABLE G. 

SHOWINa NUMBER OF DxVYS TREATMENT AND COSTS. 



No. of Free Patieuts— Table A 








...1084 
.,. 158 


Total No. Treated in 1892— Table A 








....1242 


No. of days Treatment, Free Patients 

Pay " 




.28,890 
. 3,311 










Total No. of days Treatment in 1S02 

Average No. of days to eacli Free Patient. 


32,207 


..2680 


« << (I li p^y 4{ 








. 2098 


Ilighesl No. of Patients in one daj^ in 1892 

Lowest '' •' " " '' 

Average '' " per day during *' 


""- 


107 
63 
_8-lA 
.... $22 




Cost of 32,207 days Treatment 




— 


641 37 


Cost of one day's Treatment 702 


..$18.74 


84 
53 


^22 


Average cost of each Free Patient 




" " <' Pay " 

Cost of 1084 Free Patients 


.514.73 
520 313 




" 158 Pay *' . 


2 3*^7 










Total 


...S-^'I'^ 641 


37 


6-41 37 









TABLE G, No. 2. 

ITEMIZED COST OF ONE DAY'S TREATMENT FOR YEAR 1892. 



For Subslstance $7,732 81 .24. 

For Supplies 3,848 39 .11.8 

For Medicines 1,224 91 .03.8 

For Eepairs 1,630 40 .05. 

For Nursing— Pay Roll 8,029 80 .25. 

For Lunp.tics 169 65 | 00 6 

For Advertising 5 41 . \ * * 



S22 641 37 0.70.! 



!' 



1 1 • Department of Charitia^. 



TABLE IT. 

SHOWING EAENINGS FOR Y>^1B. 1892. 



Berkeley County ?1,242 00 

Charleston County.. '.. 300 00 

Clarendon County 7 00 

British Consul 220 00 

Spanish Consul 16 00 

Charleston M. &M. Co 101 00 

Etiwan Phosphate Co ..., 44 00 

Charleston k Savannah R. R 139 00 

N. E. R. R. 63 00 

Private Patients..... 1,331 30 

CotHns 9] 50 

Sale of empty barrels, etc '.. 2 92 

Total earnings for year...,, , $3,557 72 



TABLE 1. 

SHOWING COLLECTIONS FOR YEAR 1892. 



Berkeley County % 901 00 

Charleston County 292 00 

British Consul , 313 00 

Spanish Consul 16 00 

Charleston M & M. Co 8 00 

Charleston & Savannah R. R. Co 120 00 

N. E. R. R 167 00 

Private Patients ; 1,219 50 

Coffins 53 50 

Sale of empty Barrels, etc , 2 92 

Certificate Receivable 584 55 

Total collections for year ^3,767 47 



loG Mayor Fichen^s Annual Rmew. 

TABLE J. 

SHOWING COFFINS MADS AND ISSUED DUKING YliAR 1892. 



On baud ]st JalIua^5^ 1892 13 

Made during year 1892 37G 389 

Issued 1st Health District Free 19 

Issued 2d d Plealth District Free 12 

Issued 3rd Health District Free 17 

Issued 4th Health District Free 2b 

Issued oth Health District Free .. 29 

Issued 6th Health District Free 39 

Total Health Districts 141 141 

Issued City Hospital Free 120 

Issued Health Ofilce Free 20 

Issued Coroner Free 56 

Issued Alms House Free 6 

Issued Ashley Eiver Asylum Free 2 ^ 

Issued Dr. Deveaux Free 10 

Issued Dr. Schwacke Free 1 

Issued Dr. Le])by Free 1 

Issued Dr. McClenehan Free 2 

218 218 

Total Free Coffins 359 

Issued Infirmary, Sold 6 

Issued Charleston County, Sold 3 

Issued Berkeley County, Sold 3 

Issued N.E. R. K., Sold 1 | 

Issued Chas. & Sav. R R., Bold 2 . | 

Issued Wappoo r^Iills, Sold 1 | 

Issued Spanish Consul, Sold 1 I 

Issued Private Coffins, Cash ;... 8 I 

Total sold 25 25 | 

Total issued Free and Sold..... 384 384 | 

On hand 1st January, ls93 5 | 



■«; 



Deparimait of Charities. 137 

SirOWINa MATERIAL USED AND COSTS OF SUCH DURING YEAR 1802. 

Lumber on hand January 1st, 1892 Feet 290 

Lumber received during 1S92 ]1,274 Feet 11,564 

Used during 1892 , 11,416 

Lumber on hand Janu.ary 1st, 1893 14S 

Crutches on hand January l8t, 189-2 Pair 5 

Crutches made during year 1892 SO Pair So 

Cratches issued during year 1892 29 

Crutches on hand January 1st, 1893.... 6 

Screws on hand January 1st 1892 Gross 1 

Screws received during year 1892 11 Gross 12 

Screws used during year 1892 11 

Screws on hand January 1st, 18,93... 1 

Nails on hand January 1st, 1892..... Lbs. 50 

Nails received during year 1892 100 Lbs. 150 

Nails used during year 1892 90 

Nails on hand January 1st, 1893 60 

Cost of 11,416 feet @ $20.00 per 1000 feet ■. $228 32 

Cost of 1 keg Nails, 100 Lbs. © $1.90 1 90 

Cost of 11 gross Screws @ 45c 4 95 

$235 17 



138 . Mayor Fichrh Annual PiCfineiu, 

SHOWING ASSETS JANUAKY IST, 1893. 



Cash $ 55 06 

Berkele}^ County 1,236 00 

Charleston County 240 00 

British Consul 120 00 

Charleston & Savannah R. R 19 00 

liifirinary.. 5 00 

Bolton Mines 2 00 

Wappoo Mills 6 00 

Private Patients 150 00 $1,839 86 

IN SUSPENSE. 

Beaufort County ^ 97 00 

Colleton County 42 00 

Williamsburg County 64 00 

Clarendon County 7 00 

Edisto Phosphate Co..... 98 00 

Mead Phosphate Co 71 00 

Herts Phosphate Co 72 00 

Etiwan Phosphate Co 29 50 

Charleston M. & M. Co ' 162 00 

Private Patients 473 00 $1,115 50 



TABLE M. 
FINANCIAL. 



Deficit January 1st, 1892 $ 664 65 

Cost of Hospital for year 1892 22,641 37 $23,306 02 

Cash on hand January 1st, 1892 $ 102 50 

Appropriation January 1st, 1892 17,000 00 

Appropriation December, 1892 2,000 00 

Cash received during year 1892 3,767 47 

Cash on hand January 1st 1893 55 06 22,925 03 • 

Deficit January 1st, 1893 §380 99 

I respectfully submit the foregoing as my report for 
year 1892. I 

CHAS. L. DuBOS, 
Su^L a H. 



Bepartmeni of Cho.rities. 139 



. . THE ALMS HOUSE. 

Office of Board of Commissioneks ) 

OF City Alms House, > 

Charleston, S. C, Jan'y lOtL, 1893. ) 

To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen oj the City of Charles- 
ion, s. a.- 

Gentlemen i—Enclosed please find Master's report of the 
Alms House for the year ending 3ist December, 1892, as 
presented to the Boa.rd of Commissioners, and by them or- 
dered to be sent to j^our honorable body. 

It affords us a pleasure to state that the amount necessary 
for the maintenance of the Alms House for the past year 
has been §7,869.86, leaving a b.^Lance of $230.14 to the 
credit of the appropriation. Just here allow me to call 
your attention to the fact that we stand in need of some re- 
pairs to the House, whicli will add greatly to our conve- 
nience. We therefore ask that you order of this balance say 
§100. which we think will cover the cost of the needed re- 
pairs. 

The public transportation account I have expended as 
well as I could for the benefit of our poor, and it is my 
pleasure to report a small balance to our credit in City 
Treasury. All of which is respectfully siibmitted. 
Very respectfully, 

EDVV. S. BURNHAM, 

Chairman B. C A, 11. 



THE ALMS HOUSE. 

Charleston, S. C, Jan'y 9th, 1893. 
To the Chairman and Board of Commissioners of the Alms 

IIov.se : 

Gentlemen :—I herewith present to you my annual re- 
port of the transactions of this Institution for the fiscal year 
ending December 31st, 1892. 



1.4.0 Mayor Ficken^s Annual Pieview. 

As is geneially known, the majority of the inmates are 
c^iiio c]C. D.V1I r.ob]e, onlirci}- deatitute and unable to earn 
a livelihood for themselves. As usual they have been sup- 
plied with good and substantial food, clothing, shoes and 
other necessaries when required. 

In cases of sickness medical attention has been rendered, 
the House physician, Dr. W. T. Edmonds, has always 
promptly responded to my calls, and in every case has pre- 
scribed for the relief of the patient. 

The average number of inmates during the year were 
eighty, and all who were able were required to do the work 
of the house. 

The -following statement shows the number of persons 
admitted, discharged, transferred to Hospital, and also the 
number of deaths, including their nativities : 

Admitted. 

Males 30. Females ...21. Children 7. Total, 58. 

Natives of Canada 1 

Natives of Germany 1 

Natives of Switzerland 1 

Natives of France 1 

Natives of Ireland ,. 28 

Natives of North Carolina... 1 

Natives of South Carolina 25 

Total admitted .....58 

Discharged. 

Males 10. Females 15. Children 3. Total 28 

Natives of Canada 1 

Natives of Ireland.. 12 

Natives of Germany 1 

Natives of South Carolina 14 

Total discbarged ....28 

TransfeiTed to Hospital. 

Males ...4. Females 6. Total 10; 

Natives of Ireland 7 

Natives of South Carolina 3 

Total transfers 10 



Deparlmc7d of Cliariiies. 141 

Deaths. 

Miiles „2. Females 3, Total 5. 

Natives of Ireland 3 

l> Natives of South Carolina 2 

Total deaths , 5 

Inmates of the House, 

Males. ...... ..37. Females 45. Children 4. Total ...86. 

Natives of Ireland 40 

Natives of Germany 7 

Natives of Switzerland 2 

Natives of Canada 1 

Natives of France 1 

Natives of Russia 1 

Natives of North Carolina 1 

Natives of Virginia..... 1 

Natives of Georgia 1 

Natives of New Jerst^y 1 

Natives of South Carolina 80 

Total number of inmaies.... ; 86 

11 Outdoor Pensioners. 

f White Males..... 3. Females 26. Children 26. Total 65 

1 Colored Males 17. Females 45. Children 45. Total 307 



Total outdoor pensioners.... , 162 

Number of rations drawn weekly 143 

Expenditures $7,869 86 

I am under obligations to you, gentlemen of the Board, 
for your kind and friendly feelings toward me during the 
past, year, and feel that I cannot close this report without 
making suitable acknowledgments for the same. Your 
timely aid and support on all occasions has assisted me very 
materially in the performance of my duties. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

H. G. FEAZER, Master. 



142 Mayor Ficlccfi's Annual Rcoicw. 

WILLIAM ENSTON HOME. 

Charleston, S. C, January 27tli, 1S93. 

To the IlonoraUe the Ciiy Council of CharJesion : 

Gentlemen : — Witli this we have the pleasure of handing 
you the usual statement of the cash transactions of the 
William Enston Anuitants Fund for the past year, January 
1st to December 31st, 1S92. 

Respectfully, 
WM. A. COURTENAY,) 
JNO. F. FICKEN, \ Trustees. 

W. E. BUTLER, j 

WM. E:N\STO]Si AIv^NUITANTS FUNE. 

Cash transactio'ns of W. A. Courtenay^ J, F. Fickeno.nd W, 
E. Butler, Trustees, from Jany. /, '92, to Dec. 31, '92. 
{Statement Ho. 10.) 

Jan'y. 1, '92. To balance cash on hand $ 104 07 

To interest on State Stock, January 

and July $6,702 00 

To interest on City Bonds, January 

and July.. 3,400 00 

To interest on Camden Bonds (less 

ex) ..., 448 90 

To interest on Sumter Bonds (less 

ex) 718 20 11,359 10 

$11,463 17 

EXPENDITURES. 

'Annuities for 1892 $ 7,500 

Expenses of Administration 45 ? 7,545 

Trustees commissions on receipts $11,359 10 

Trustees commissions on disbursements: 7,545 00 

Trustees commissions on disbursements...... 3,260 00 

• 22,164 10 at 2i % 554 10 

Paid Trustees Wm. Enston Home Surplus 1892 $ 3,200 00 

Balance Cash on hand 104 07 

$11,403 17 



Department oj Charities. 143 



il 



If 



fei 



ASSETS. 



$113,200 State Stock, (South Carolina) costing....$l 15,333 42 
8-5,000 Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds, costing... 03,487 51 

12,000 Sumter 6 per cent. Bonds, costing 12,000 00 

7,500 Camden 6 per cent. }3onds, costing 7,500 00 

Cash 104 07 



$217,700 $198,425 00 

E. E. Charleston. December 31, 1892. 



WM. A. COTJriTENAY, , 

JNO. F. FICKEN, [ Trmices. 

W. E. BUTLER, 



Charleston, S. C, January STtli, 1893. 

To the UonoraMe the Mayor anrl Aldermen of Charleston: 

Gentlemen :—The Trustees of the William Enston 
Home beg leave to report that another successful year has 
f I been passed in the administration of the affairs of the Home 

II . the general health of the residents averaging seventy-five to 

|;| eighty persons during the year has been good, no case of 

■ local sickness occurring during the year. 

The cottages are in excellent condition and kept in a very 
1 1 neat manner; from all residents there is the expression of 

satisfaction at the accommodations. 

There were five deaths during the twelve months — one 
^ betv/een SO and 90 ; one between 70 and 80 ; three between 

60 and 70 ; the first was from old age, the others were from 
dropsy, paralysis, Bright's disease, and apoplexy. 

The Memorial Hall is supplied VN'ith magazines and news- 
papers, and is a general parlor for residents, a number of 
whom use it at stated times for religious services. 

Herewith the Trustees submit their annual financial 
statement, showing that wdth continued economy the in- 
I come suffices for the administration of this beneficent trust, 

} as at present conducted. 

Very respectfullv, 

WM, A. COURTENAY. 

President. 



144 Mayor Fickxn'H Annual He o lew. 



^YM. ENSTON HOME. 

Ca^h Iieceipis and Expemliturea from January i, '5.9, to 
Decemler 31. '92, 



IlECEIPTS- , 

From interest, &c, General Fund $3,002 47 

From interest, &c., New Cottages Fund 763 SO % 3,766 27 

Annuitants Fund Surplus for 1892 (Nev/ Cottages acc't) 3,260 00 

Sales Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds... 8,965 00 

Bills receivable 2,857 89 

Cash on hand January 1, 1892 302 69 



119,151 85 



EXPENDITURES. 

Expenses of Administration $ 2,672 01 

F\iel and Lights 700 23 

Sundry permaneJit Improvements 543 79 

Investments, Greenville Bonds • .? 3,000 

Union Bonds $2,700, Kershav>^ Bonds $3,000 5,700 

Si^artanburg Bonds 6,000 $14,700 00 



Balance Cash on hand 535 82 

% 19,151 85 

ASSETS. 

$3,500 Charleston 4 per cent. Bonds, costing in 

balance $ 2,027 77 

5,000 Colleton 7 per eent.-Bonds, costing 5.000 00 

10,000 Marion 6 per cent Bonds, costing 9,750 00 

7,000 Winnsboro 7 per cent. Bonds, costing... 7,035 00 

15,000 Personal 7 per cent. Bonds, costing 15,000 00 

2,500 Greenville 7 per cent. Bonds, costing 2,500 00 

6,000 Spartanburg 7 per cent. Bonds, costing.. 6,000 00 
Ca.sh Bonds costing 133 95 $ 47,445 82 



NEW COTTAGES FUND. 

f 2,902.53 State Stock 6 per cent, costing $ 2,902 53 

11,000.00 Charleston 4 cer cent. Bonds, costing. 9,058 75 

2,700.00 Union 7 per cent. Bonds, costing 2,700 00 

3,000.00 Kershaw 7 per cent. Bonds, costing... 3,000 00 
500.00 Greenville 7 per cent. Bonds, costing., 500 00 

Cash 402 77 18,564 05 



$66,009 87 
E. E. Charleston, December 31, 1892. 

\YM. A. COURTENAY, Freddent. 



Dcpartmeni of Chariiics, 345 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF 
ASHLEY RIVER ASYLUM. 

To Ms Honor the Mayor and City Council of Cliarleston : 

I have the honor to submit the following annual report 
of the Ashley River As3^1um : 

In presenting this report I take pleasure in placing on 
record my thanks to the Commissioners for the deep interest 
they have taken in the Institution, which was a great as- 
sistance to me, and made my position very pleasant. I 
must also speak of the faithful and efficient manner in 
which the Secretary and Treasurer, Mr. F. A Lord, and the 
Steward and Matron, Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Holmes, have per- 
formed their duties. 

The rations furnished the inmates are pure and v/hole- 
some. They consist of sugar, coffee, tea, m. classes, bacon, 
fresh beef, fish, grist, mealand bread. Tobacco is occasionally 
given to those v/ho use it ; they are also supplied v/ith 
warm and comfortable bedding, and all necessary clothing, 
shoes, hats and fuel. 

The premises have been put in thorough repair, all of the 
buildings are now^ roofed with the best quality of tin, and 
have been painted and whitewashed throughout, and if no 
unforeseen accident occurs, the Commissioners next year 
will have but little cause to spend any money for repairs. 

The Board has used diligent endeavors to buy all supplies 
at lowest market prices, and to have all work done in a sub- 
stantial manner at as low prices as could be obtained. In 
practicing such strict economy, they have not done so to 
the detriment of the Institution or its inmates, for they 
have put the buildings in better condition than they have 
been for some time, and have increased the articles of food, 
which give the inmates a better diet than they have had 
under other administrations, and I am pleased to say we 
have to our credit with the City Treasurer an unexpended 
amount of our appropriation of $470-77, and had to pay 
10 



-..■f 



14G 2 fay or FickciiS Annual Revietv. 

some outstanding bills contracted b\ previous Board of 
Commissioners. 

Annexed to this please find the Secretary and Treasurer's 
report, showing receipts horn all sources during the year, 
and disbursements of saine. 

Yours respectfully, 

R. S. CATHCART, ^ 
Chair rami. 

Report of the Secreiary and Treasurer of Ashley River Asylum^ 
In Accou7ii 'With the City Treasurer^ December 31st, 1892. 



285 00 




52 70 




25 50 




9 90 




95 00 




11 85 




$5 


,979 95 



Amount appropriated by Council $5,500 00 

" 9 months rent of Farm 

Sale of Hogs 

" Interment Fees 

" News and Courier 

'' due for 3 months Lease of Farm 

. " from Sale of Empty Barrels, &c 



• CREDITS. 

Amount paid for Salaries $1,109 72 

" " Supplies 3,153 59 

" " Insurance *. 126 00 

" " "Repairs 86 13 

" " Whitewashing 95 00 

" " Painting 88 00 

'' '• Tinning 811 46 

** " Christmas Dinner 39 28 

To balance in band of Treasurer 470 77 



?5,979 95 

Number of Inmates admitted during the year 35 

'• " who died during the year 27 

" " at the present time 66 

Interments in the Pub. Grounds during the y'r, males. ...294 Colored. 

" " *' males.... 8 White. 

" " " females, 175 Colored. 

" Seaman's " " " males 3 Colored. 

Yours respectfully, 

F. A. LORD, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



Fire Dcparirnenl. , 147 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Office Board of Fjee-Mastef.s, ) 

Charleston, S. C, January Ist, 1893. ) 

2'o the Hon. Ifayor and City Council of diarleston : — 

The Board of Fire-Masters respectfully submit the opera- 
tions of this Department for the year 1S92, and its condi- 
tion at this date, as contained in the annexed statements, 
which will shov/ :'— 

The force of the department. 

Condensed expenses from January 1st, to December 31st, 
1892. 

Summary of expenses by companies from January 1st, 
to^ December 31st, 1892. 

Record of fires for the year 1892. 

Inventory of property 31st December, 1892. 

Comparative statement of property at risk, insurance and 
loss. 

FRAKCIS S. RODGERS, 
Chairman Board of Fire-Masters. 



FOKCE OF THE DEPARTMENT DECEMBER 31ST, 1892. 

103 Officers and Men. 
7 Steam Fire Engines in Service. 
3 Steam Fire Engines in Eeserve. 

1 Steam Fire Engine Condemned. 
9,014 Feet of Hose. 

2 Fuel Wagons. 
1 Cart. 

3 Alarm Bells and Complete System of Fire Alarm Telegraph. 
3 Hook and Ladder Trucks. 

7 Hose Carriages. 
29 Horses. 



148 Mayor Fichciis Ammal Review, 

Condensed Expensj:? of the Fike Depaktivient Fi^o^r Jan- 
UAKY 1st to DECEi[n];;K 31sT, 1892. 

ray Rol] $36,482 34 

Grain and Hay for 29 Horses 2,355 05 

Wood and Coal G84 00 

Oil, AVaste and Supplies 204 53 

Repairs and Tmprovenipnts to Apparatus 536 52 

Repairs and Improvements to Houses and Tovrers 272 99 

New Harness and Eepairs to Plarness 224 CO 

New Hose, 2,000 feet Leading [lose, $1,095 ; 2 Suction Hose, 

$129.50; 50 feet small, ?8=... 1,232 50 

New Apparatus, (Aerial Truck) 2,500 00 

Horse Shoeing 317 88 

4 Horses 1,050 00 

Printing and Stationery 8 68 

Fire Alarm Telegraph Supplies 756 83 

1 Signal Box at Enston Home 125 00 

1 Indicator 125 00 

Veterinary 21 61 

House and Stable Utensils 43 13 

Incidental Exj)enses of Fire Depo.rtment 420 46 

$47,361 12 

By Sale of 4 Horses $ 240 00 

By Sale of Old Metal SO 57 

Bv Sale of Manure ' 35 02 

. $ 355 59 

$ 47,005 53 



w 



CEMBE:R, 1892. 



Origin of Fii-ks 



Occulta lit or Ov/ner < 
Personal Property 



20 00 



100 2.5 



a5.t)0L» o<:» 

375 00 

6 OU 

5 00 

lU 00 

m 00 

157 50 



Mrs J. Hynes and others 
A.'RDi'Hoiii'ngs. 



10 O'.t 
20 00 



.50 00 
TO 00 
90 00 
30 00 
J9,(>8ti 00 
10 W) 



l,Uob -10 



10 CO: 
277 00: 
300 00 i 

a5 ooi 

300 00: 
25 001 

1 



50 00 



1,426 m\ 
335 50 i 
100 00; 



15 00 



305 00, 

30 00 : 



42 001 
52 00 i 
10 00^ 



5 00 



117 00 

120 00 

2 00 

10 00 

5-50 00 



35 00 

50 00 

1,251 00 


3(t0 00 
50 OtJ 
10 00 



g.63,0C(l 65' 



Sp'ks from chimney 

Chimney 

Acfidont 

C:hi)niiey 

Accideut Palmetto BresviTi^r Co. 

Accident i Charleston Ice Mfg. Co. 

Accident ! N. Dunlap. 

Sp'ksfrom chimney; Rose Poter. 
Sp'ks from chimney; C- Jacob!. 

Accident j Police Department. 

Carelessness | J. ^Marjenholf. 

ChJamey.. j 

Accident ! L. L. Keed. 

Accident ! Wra. Heidt and others. 

Accident j P. P. Toale. 

Chimney j 

Sp'ksfrouiSawMillj South Carolina R, R. 

Accident I Various colored people. 

Accident [11. \7. Purvis 

Accident 1 Cham.pion. Cotv-on Press Co. 

Accident ! St;'.te Military Academy. 

Sp'ks from Loco'tvei Soaih Carolina R. R. Co. 

False Alarm i 

Chimney I 

Defective Flue \ (i. W. Johnston. 

False Alarm i 

Sp'ks f film chim.ney'' Charlotte Simmons and othe- 

Iiicondiary j li^noccupied. 

Accident i P. L. Turpin and others. 

Accident ! John Graddic. 

Accident j j I. M. Johnson. 

Accident I S-outh Carolina R. R. Co. 

False Alarm • 

Defective Flue. . . . . j E. C and R. S. Millings. 

False Alarm 

Accident ! Mrs. S. S. McElree. 

Accident j D. O'Neill <fc Sons. 

Accident | H. Klatto. 

Foose Jute in Yard . i 

Defective Flue j Wm. Johnson and others. 

Stove Fxplosion 1 

Lightning; j Various person.s. 

Lamp PJxplosion. . . ! Various person.s. 

False Alarm ! 

.Sp'ks from. Engine, j Jacob Knobloch. 

False Alarm i 

Sp'.i-isfrom Loco'tve: South Carolina R. R. Co. 
Sp'ksfrojn chimney! Ida J. Webb. 
Sp'ksfromchimneyj Various persons. 

Fakse Alarm 

Ash Barrel 

Sp'ks from chimney 

Chimney , 

P'alse Alarm | 

Chimney 

Defective Flue I Edward Johnson. 

Accident ' Various persons, 

Sp'ks from chimney! Mary Judge and others. 
.Sp'ks from chimneyl Ellen WiLson and others. 

Defective I'lue j A. Bertirello. 

Chimney : . . i 

Stove I'ipe I Ellen Doyle and others. 

Hot coals from Eng.t East Shore Terminal Co. 
Defective Fhie. . ... I L. Murphy, A. W. Ristig& C. M. I. Co 

False Alarm ! 

Accifient j II. Wholers. 

AccideTit I J. A. Young. 

Gasoline Stove Ex'n I Rouson ct Kressell. 

Chimney j 



Eliza Spencer- 



f:'>^\ 



RECORD OF FIRES FOR TWELV.E MONTHS, ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1892. 



Datb j 'liMK 1 Box. j Location of Fihe | 0^\^-I:u of Real Estate 


Property at 


Insurance 


Lesson 
Real Estate 


P^XS^l 
Property 


Total 1.0. 1 OBXcv OF FiuES | °^f^S^\SZ^/' 


Jan. 410 _ am! 'r, .5S0 King Street 

jaii! SK!-;2am '« R1Vt!^fk■e^\vc■n^lc^^ni■ binr- Street!! 

i^ Ifi^Slj;;;; ,^? ';-:■•!:,■)•:■:■::■.:■!!!!!•■!!!!!!■■ 

Jan. 17il2.wipm! IM . 1 ...•.; 1 v:- r„ 

Jan. M !i.l.-i a ml ;i ■ :.^ i 

Jan. M'U.M am •, 1 . . : 

Sililli =!!:,:■}! 

Feb. 4U.37pm! 1', 

Feh. 7l S..OII p Uii ^i , . , i . .' . .- i . '- 

Feb. l:!'l:;.3« p ml .-iJ .' M' ' 

^. ^m'^ "' ' "■ -.!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!!!! 

March 1 4.3.-, ,m ^> ... . ' W: .il : 

^K ti'^ind m! ■ ■. ^..■.--- 


^Ir?. J. Hyucs 

a!f! ri. Hiiuings!!!!!!!!!'!!!!!!!!!! 

!':.inK;i!iii;.-u;n!:'co!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

C!.:-! .-Vr, 1...;- -M K' 1'.,.^ 

'■' !^!."i;!!"''. ■"":■!!!!!!!!!!::!!!.!!!! 
soiui,L;>i,,i;i,H"k. k!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 


S GOU Ot 

"""ifibb'bb 
m,ma 

■<i,tKiO 1:0 
1,60U Ot 
1,1)00 0( 


S 400 00 

i'.swVoii 

»3",6o6'66 

.50,000 00 

soo'w 

10,000 00 


8 20 00 

20,6o6u{ 

200 Of 

157 50 

iw'iio 

ii 

■|ii,6(Xiw 

1000 

ais'-ii 

277 ot. 
;iOO oc 

35 to 
.W (!0 
25 00 

5606 

ihh'w 

. 8.5 .50 

ia'tio 

276'66 

30 Ou 
2500 

.woo 

10 00 






Mrs J. Hynes and others. 


i66i5 

m\mm 

175 00 

iiw 


li 


criimney:;!:!!-:!:v 


^hl^?^ !:;;;;.■:!!! 

Accirteut 

Accident 

Acci.lent 

Sp;ksi:romcliimne> 
Sp'kstromch mncv 
Accident 


Palmetto Brewing Co. 
Charleston Ice Mfg. Co. 
N. Dunlap. 
Rose Potcr. 

Police Department. 


.i!™!) ii{i| ii.sw oil 

«!;;';«; vwou 

l,!-AIII (HI GIIO 01 

''•■""' '■ 

'■"'"'■ "" '^^''^•'•''> 

'I'jm'm Mo'oii 

566'66 ;i66'6ii 


75 00 

20 00 


5fdSii:!!!:!-i!:i 

2000; Vc..i.k,il 


L.L.keed.' 

Wm.lleidt. and others. 


t-iv! I'iy. !rl V'' '( MirrVi'.3 Co! !!!!!!!! ! 
\N\!j'!'Anfctr!!''!'!^!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

s.C.K. H.Co 

B.'cViNi'iiiinss!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
Sirs.'j! c! ■.sifwaid! ! .!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

0. O'Xc-ill i: Min„ 






ciii'sin.! tf !' e"K. ■ k! YaVd! !!!!!!!!! 


30 00 
3,186 UO 

imiib 

976 W 

250 00 


■ ' 1 •. ■. iTessCo. 

.,,■.,1:; \:.:tS^: 






April ' "ijlpi P ill 

^s;!:il i^5!t?s;;; 

April I-' 3.57 a 111 
Miiy 14 b.-M p m 

^ i !ij;s 

iil^J ^l^!Sls::i 

Juiio ll| f.l-i p m 

Oct. l:;|12.0,^, p m 

Oct! iJ-t's'.illAritm 
Oct. -'al 4.24 a ni 


lU.S ja.W falhouu Street 

1:,^ ' " '!'!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 


277 ot 
300 t». 

2500 
sooo 

i!426'0'j 

100 01- 

is'ti. 

mi" 

m oi 

42 01 

fo%"i 
i'm 


iJcfcctive'Flue!!!!! 
False Alarm 

False Alarm. ".''.'.'I'! 
s|/k°i;m™cl'.hmref 


1: ' .'.. -. .. -ing3. 


iijRhodie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
RiVMnnay!!!;!;!!!!:!!!!!!:!!!!!!! 


3.5M 




..wn andother.?. 


Cotton Factory Co 


.j.iliiu'l'lil 

' siiou 

4,(«10 00 
4,000 00 

i!666"66 


.3,.500 00 

stiooo 


::::^:°" 


Jaci.U knobioch.' 


f 

■-■:« 

511! 
IW 
lVl.5 

3il 

1,51 











Fliza Spencer. 


















UBoKard'streci!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
io2 clu h™ a street !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
3o'L;"n-r: ^ ^'^t^•.•ci !! ■!■■:!!:!!!!!!!: ! 

iii'van^i. i.i'r- — i-V,- !!!:!!!!: 

?S-E;Vi!lir:':"; :''■"."-'!!!!!!!! 

t&si^eet!!!!!!!!!!!!!:::;:;;;: 

X. E. Cor. East Bay & Jlarket St... 


.laVieWaikeV 

F.J. Liiiinth^.i. .!!..! !.!.!!!.!. 

r!^^■■. sciyniuus!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!! !!!!!! 
!■::!!.! liuvie!!!!!!!!!;;;;;!!!!!!;!!!!! 

Fa^i Mm, ic Terminal Co 

c r .iin c r !s! ' Biohme ! ! ! ! ! ! ! .' ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 

Tlioinas You.ii,' 

Estate E.Biill 






40000 
V.66600 

z^ 

10 00 




22 60 

15000 

.56'i)0 

2.5100 

'". ■■■'ioo'oo 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 


iii'oii 

120 00 

10 00 




700 00 

2:000 ot 

ii.iioo'oo 

iV.iwViio 




!' ; V '■■;',','hc?s. 


Sn^:! Sii5!^i;iS 

Dec. ,-.1 4.US p m 
Dc... IS Ui.IO p m 
Dec. P.U^.lWpm 
Dec. L--'! .i.4:J p m 

te pS!S{:s 


•■■•■•2;.566o6 


1,2.-,1 Wl 11. : i ■-.. 


1. ..: , . .,, ., i\.i;.''i.ViC.M.l.Co 
L;^Hies.eU. 





















_^ 




. 


_,nM.^v; uu, >:;i:uc,^». 


S12.102 10 


_S2o.^J5. 


=.::^!i:-lL-J^L 


_- - _ - 



Fire Department. 



149 



CovijMrcitive Statement e)f Projyerty at Rish, Insureinee 
and Loss. 





B 

c3 


Property 




Loss on 


J^oss on 






< 


at 


Insurance 


Real 


Personal 


Total Loss 


p 


O 


Kisk 




Estate 


Property 




^ 


d 










' 


1882 


3-i|.? 298,500 00'$ 100,205 00 


$ 12,5.39 09:$ 20,087 52$ 32,626 61 


1883 


72 1,229,885 41 1 1,112,350 00 


50,261 19 


243,699 11 


293.960 30 


1884 


43 


412,163 001 305,238 54 


31,665 00 


70,494 98! 102,159 98 


1885 


50 


394.802 14 251,100 00 


5,103 SO 


22,359 79: 27,403 59 


1886 


57 


431,774 43i 356,024 43 


46,325 55 


62,216 09! 108,541 64 


1887 


43 


1,191.577 OO! 1,125,025 00 


5,081 00 


42,455 17 j 47,536 17 


1888 


35i 1,256,991 SSj 1.241,685 00 


17,127 00 


86,042 88 1 103,169 88 


1889 


521 941,975 00; 898.555 00 


17,413 00 


50,475 00: 67,888 00 


1890 


381 521.275 OOi 341.850 00 
54! 1.549,725 00! 1.420,350 00 


16,431 00 


31,125 00 1 47,556 00 


1891 


12,086 50 


27,928 17! 40,014 67 


1892 


06 


380,887 OOl 243,262 00 


42,102 40 
$ 256,135 53 


20,989 25 j 63,091 65 




544 


§8,604,555 86 


S7,401,644 97 


§677,872 96! $934,008 49 



Average fok Eleven Years. 

Property at Risk $782,232 35 

Insurance 672,876 81 

Loss on Real Estate $ 23,285 05 

Loss on Personal Property 61,624 81 

Total Lo.ss $ &4,909 86 



150 



May or Fkl'cnh Annual Jlen.iew, 






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Locations 


Engine House No. 1, Meeting Street 

Engine House No. 2, Wentworth Street 

Engine House No. 8, Meeting Street 

En .cine House No. 4, Wentworth Street 

Engine House No. 5. Meeting Street 

Engine House No, 6, Cannon Street 

Kn/ine House No. 7, Cannon Street 

Truik No. 1, IMeetlng Street 

Kescrve House No. 1, Meeting Street 

lUstrve Jlouse No. 2, John Street 

Department Hend Quarters, Meeting Street.. 

¥^v^i .Harm Telegraph, Meeting Street 

Engine House, ciueeu Street 


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152 Mayor Ficheyi\s Ammal Pievicio. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 

Officp: Chief of Police, | 
January Otli, 1S93. \ 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit to you here- 
with my Annual Report for the fiscal year ending Decem- 
ber 31st, 1892. 

Accompanying tlie report are detailed statements which 
will give, I trust, an intelligent idea of the work of the year, 
the condition of the Department together with certain recom- 
mendations which I regard as essential to enable us under 
the present state of affairs, to remove certain embarrassments 
that daily arise. 

In this connection I beg leave to annex certain Exhibits 
below, which will explain some of the evils that confront 
us as tlie conditions now exist, and ask your careful con- 
sideration of the same. 

EXHIBIT A. 

The present system of referring Police cases to Trial Jus- 
tices for jury trials by the Recorder, upon the demand of 
the .prisoners, furnishes such a loophole that the most 
hardened criminals can escape punishment regardless of 
what offences they have committed, that does not warrant 
their being bound over to the Court of Sessions. 

The law, as it exists at present in Charleston County, ac- 
cording to the General Statutes, gives a prisoner the right 
to demand a jury trial, and in that particular there is no 
objection, but the difficulty exists in the character of the 
juries selected to decide the cases at the Courts to 
which they are referred, and I feel confident if it is compe- 
tent to try all violations of City Ordinances by a jury to be 
selected by the Recorder, (only upon a demand of the 
prisoner, ''however," to be tried by jury), that the results 
would be infinitely more satisfactory. 



Police DcpartmenL 153 

Theoflenders would tlienalso be deprived of tlie resort to 
ii.;v.4,--,;..I'LL pcroOiij to SOI \\j as tlicir bondsmen at the Trial 
Justices' Court, who are professional hangers-on, *'as they 
are termed," and ready to go on any prisoner's bond for a 
small consideration. 

Numbers of cases could be cited w^here criminals, keepers 
of disorderly houses, etc., have been enabled to escape 
punishment in the past year, due to the facts stated above, 
as >Yell as the want of proper care in the selection of im- 
partial citizens to serve as jurymen. 

EXHIBIT B. 

As the enforcement of the Dog Law comes under my 
jurisdiction, I would suggest that the Ordinance in relation 
to dogs, as contained in Section 465, be modified and the 
license besomevv-hat reduced. 

.There is also an inconsistency in Section 467, which re- 
quires the same fine to be imposed upon tliose persons who 
have conformed with the lavv' in regard to securing licenses, 
as to. those who have evaded the la?/ up to the time their 
dogs are captured, when they are then forced to secure 
licenses in order to have their dogs released, and in that 
connection I think the Ordinance could be improved, so as 
to impose a small penalty upon all parties v/ho fail to se- 
cure a license within, a reasonable tme. 

EXHIBIT c. 

In nearly every city wdiere there is a Police Department 
of any magnitude, there is a Police Surgeon, whose duty is 
to attend the members performing police service, and visit 
ofScers 'who are reported sick or disabled. 

In the event of such sickness of any of the officers the 
Surgeon makes a report to the Police Department, giving 
the cause and nature of the sickness, and thus as soon as an 
officer is reported sick he visits him, and the Department, 
by this means, is able to know v/hethcr the sickness is real 
or assumed. 



154 Mayor Fichmh Annual Revieiv. 

Such nn officer, in my opinion, is greatly needed in our 
city, and J understand througli letters and other informa- 
tion received from many places, that the Health Otiicers 
usually serve in that capacity. 

EXHIBIT D. 

The cells, as they are located at present, are in a 'most 
objectionable place, their exposed condition renders them 
extremely cold in winter and very y/arm in summer. 
Another objectionable feature is that they are constructed 
directly over the cistern, which renders them very damp. 

To relieve this difficulty I would suggest that a portion 
of the building recently purchased by the city on Hudson 
street be fitted up for the accommodation of the horses and 
wagons, now in the Main Station, and that the space now 
used for the Y,'agons, etc., be utilized in the construction of 
proper cells, etc., for prisoners. 

In this connection I will say, that in my judgment the 
purchase of the property by the city on the corner of Hud- 
son and King streets will prove a most valuable adjunct to 
this Department. 

Upon inquiry of the authorities in New Orleans, Savan- 
nah, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Baltimore, Philadelphia and 
other cities, I am in receipt of considerable information as 
to the construction of ceils, stables, etc., and will furnish 
Council with the details as soon as it is expedient for them 
to utilize that property. 

STKENGTII OF THE FOKCE. 

The discipline of the Force has been thoroughly main- 
tained, and kept at its full strength, viz. : One Chief, three 
Lieutenants, one Electrician, two Orderly Sergeants, four 
Line Sergeants, two Gate Sentinels, three Detectives, eighty 
Privates, two Draymen, five Drivers. 

In connection with this matter, I desire to call your 
attention to the inconsistencies I find in the practical work- 
ing of the Department as enumerated above. 

Eight Sergeants are absolutely required to perform the 



\r'^'-i. !'■ 



Police Department. 155 

dut}^ oil the streets. It lias been the custom to appoint 
iiom trie ranks lour Acting Sergeants, whose responsibilities 
and duties are identically the same as the regular Ser- 
geants, but witli less pay. 

Again, four gatemen are required. I find that two pri- 
vates are detailed as gatemen, at a salary of fifty dollars per 
month, to do the same duty as the regular gatemen, wdiose 
salaries are forty dollars per month. 

In my judgment, it would be v/ell to create eight regular 
Sergeants and four regular gatemen, who, under those 
circumstances, would each receive the same pay in their 
respective positions ; at the same time the amount of funds 
expended by the city would, not be increased. We also have 
three Detectives, and require four. Officer McManus is 
detailed for detective duty, and I think his efiiciency, 
together v/ith the necessity for the services of that number 
of detectives, warrant my asking that this change from a 
private to a detective be granted. 

The loss of men from active service caused by sickness, 
together with the constant and increasing demand for offi- 
cers to be detailed for special duty in citizen's clothes, ren- 
ders the actual number of policeman performing street duty 
as our Force is now constituted, inadequate to furnish such 
police protection as we would like to give the citizens at 
large. 

On the 12th of July the mounted force was practically 
put in operation, and Privates Charlon, Beaudrot, Hanley 
second, and Brabham, with Private Butler as a reserve, 
were taken from the Force for the purpose of patrol- 
ing the Northern Division, and I can safely say, that 
the above service was greatly needed, although it weakened 
the patrol in the city proper five men. 

Five horses were purchased by the Department for this 
service, and properly equipped ; considering the territory 
which they cover, extending from river to river, north of 
\ Shepard and Cooper streets to the City Boundary, and the 

extra service required of them in parades and large assem- 
blages, has made that brcmch of the service a necessity. 



15G Mayor Fklenh Annual Heview. 

A stable \yas built in Hudson street by the Department 
on the property now owned by the city, and completely 
furnished at a nominai cost, without extra appropriation 
for this purpose. 

I therefore suggest, if practicable, that nve additional 
men be appointed for this mounted service, thereby return- 
ing to the cit}' proper the men detailed to patrol the 
suburbs. 

A report of the various charges against the members of 
the Department, together with the disposition of the same, 
will be found annexed to the Annual Report. 

I regret to report the deaths of Privates Hayden and 
Coogan, which occurred on October llth and October 20th 
respectively. 

While there has been no epidemic am.ong the men, there 
has been considerable sickness from ordinary causes. 

The Detective Force, during the past year, in connection 
with the Department, have accomplished a great deal of 
most excellent v>'ork ; all cases coming to their knowl- 
edge have been promptly attended to and successfully 
worked, no criminals within our jurisdiction are at large, 
and the convictions in the Court of Sessions attest the ab- 
solute importance of this branch of the service under my 
command. 

I attach a few of the eases tried in the November term of 
the Court, together with the sentences, which will be found 
annexed to the Annual Report. 

Upon assuming control of the Police Department, I found 
a number of gambling houses, in the nature of policy 
shops, were in operation in this city ; within a short period 
of time my officers reported that they had succeeded, under 
my instructions, in closing all such policy shops, and we 
have endeavored to enforce the law rigidly in this particu- 
lar, and believe that no such policy shops are now in ex- 
istence here. 

The following places were reported by my officers as 
doing business at that time : 



Police DqjarlmernL 157 

Morket sivr-M. norih side, betv/een Church and I^Ieetino:. 

Queen street, opjDositc Philadelphia. 

Corner of King and Line streets. 

Northwest corner of Meeting and Market. 

Market street, south side, below Church. 

No. 96 Market street. 

No 1 State street. 

No. 2 Anson street. 

Market street, near Archdale. 

Northeast corner Market and Meeting streets. 

This does not include numbers of small vendors, who 
had to suspend operations upon the discontinuance of this 
business by the principals. 

The Central Station has been kept in good repair, the 
sanitary works kept in order and sufficient hose, together 
with the proper pipes for the use of the same, have been 
connected directly with the Main to each flooi* of the build- 
ing, which furnishes ample security in the emergency 
of a fire. 

The Patrol Wagons are also in good order, and the horses 
for use of same are of a very superior quality. 

Three new horses were purchased, independent of any 
'extra appropriation, to supply the places of those that had 
become unfit for active service. 

The Police Signal and Telephone Service has given sat- 
isfaction, and the electrician has kept the instruments and 
lines in good condition during the entire year. 

I w^ould like to say that I am impressed with the fact 
that too much care cannot be exorcised in the selection of 
proper persons to be appointed on the force; a man to make a 
good policeman must be possessed with soberness, courage 
and discretion ; any officer v/ho goes on his beat in condi- 
tion to discharge his duties properly, and then through 
drink wilfully becomes unfit to discharge those duties, 
should be dismissed from the force without delay ; this has 
been our policy from the beginning, and if there is one of- 



158 Mayor FicJcen's Ayimial Remew. 

fericie Tr>nvf> thnri nnotbe^ which wo h?.vc steadily doclined 
to overlook it is this one. 

The number of arrests is not a criterion of police work, 
but rather the number of felonies and misdemeanors of im- 
portance that go undetected and unpunished. 

The respect and fear of a criminal for a well organized, 
equipped and disciplined police force is a potent preventive 
of crime We have escaped to a remarkable extent from 
serious crimes, and the good record of the past year en- 
courages the Department to a determination that the future 
shall witness no relaxation of vigilance. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks to his Honor 
the ^layor, who is responsible in no small degree for the 
present general efficiency of the Department and the har- 
mony and good feeling that exists, the logical result of 
Vvdiich has been a steady improvement in the character of 
the work done. 

I desire also to commend to your attention and approval 
the unfaltering and judicious performance of duty b}^ the 
Officers, Detectives and Members of the Force, and to ex- 
press to them my personal appreciation, for without their 
hearty co-operation with me, much of the best work of the 
year, and that which gives me most satisfaction as I now 
recall it, could not have been performed. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Yours very respectfully, 

J, ELMOEE MARTIN, 

Cldef of Police. 

Official : CHAS. LIEBENROOD, 

Orderly Sergt. 



Po lice Depo rtm ent. 



159 



Biatemeni of Charges Preferred against Mcmljers of the 
Force and the Bisjwsition of same. 









CD 
no 










OFFENCES. 


V. 


P 


03 

r:3 




» 






a» 


pK 


o 




c3 






C3 


m 


Ti 


?5s 


^ 






^ 


CO 


A 


« 


^ 



Asleep on Po.st 

Absent without Leave 

Absent frooi IloU Call 

AbBect from Drill 

Alknving Prisoner to Escape 

Being' oil' Post 

Bedding and Clothing Filthy 

Conduct unbecoming- an Officer 

rx)nversing with Citizens while on Duty 

Contempt of Court , ' 

Failing to attend Alarm of Fire ,, 

Failing to attend Court of Sessions 

Intoxication 

Insubordination 

Leaving Post and going into Bar Room 

Leaving Post and going into Floiise of 111 

Fame 

.rvlisslng Relief Wagon '. 

Neglect of Dut^^ 

iSending in Unnecessary Call for Wagon 

Unnece^ssarily Clubbing a Prisoner 

Violation of Orders 

Smoking on Duty 

Kefusing to make an Arrest T\^hen called upon 



64 



10 



1 

7 
14 
1 
1 
6 
1 
9 
3 
1 



1 
1 
13 
2 
2 

T 

2 

1 



6 87 



Resigned, 13 ; Discharged, 10 ; Died, 
cies, 2, December 31st 



2—25. Appointed 23 ; Vacan- 



Lisi of Criminals sent to the Court of Sessions froin the 
Police Department.^ and Convicted at the Novertiber Term 
of Court, 180^2. 

George Gates — Murder of Robt. Simmons, 5 years Peni- 
tentiary. 

Frank Elliott — Aggravated Assault, 1 year Penitentiary. 

AVm. Wasbington™ Assault and Battery, 6 montb Peni- 
tentiary. 



160 Mayor Fich:i'i> Annual Beuiao. 

Wdi. Wil'^on. — Mnrdor of Willi o Brennan, 5 years Peni- 
tentiary. 

Joseph Brown — Burglary and Larceny, 5 years Peni- 
tentiary. 

John Lee— Burglary and Larceny, 5 years Penitentiar3\ 

John Singleton — Grand Larceny, 1 year Penitentiary. 

Henry Brown — Assaulting an Officer, 6 months Peni- 
tentiary. 

Wm. Hamilton—Grand Larceny, 1 year Penitentiary. 

Cooley Harris — Aggravated Assault, 2 years Peniten- 
tiary. 

Edw. Smalls — Housebreaking and Larceny, 1 year Peni- 
tentiary. 

Wm. }>Iiddleton — Housebreaking and Larceny, 1 year 
Penitentiary. 

Jas. Singleton — Housebreaking and Larceny, 1 year Peni- 
tentiary. 

Yv^m. xVdams — Housebreaking and Larceny, 1 year Peni- 
tentiary. 

John Smith —Burglary, 2 years Penitentiary. 

Sam Howard — Murder of Dan Levds, 1 year Penitentiary. 

Stephen Robinson — Burglary and Larceny, 5 3''ear3 Peni- 
tentiary. 

Wm. Gibson — Rescuing a Prisoner. 1 year Penitentiary. 

Stephen Edwards — Aggro,vated Assault, 1 year Peniten- 
tiary. 

Edward Scriven — Gar-breaking and Larceny, 1 year Peni- 
tentiary. 

Edward Grant — Highway Robbery, 1 year Penitentiary. 



Police Dcpartincid. 



161 



Bwori of the Ch^ff of Poh'cr fo ihc Honorable Mayor and City 
Council of CJiarlesion, showing the 7iumbcr of Persons Ar- 
rested in the City of Charleston during the Fiscal Year 
landing December 31st, 1892, and the cause of their arrest. 





Amount of Fines 
imposed at Po- 
lice Court 1 

1 


Amount of Fines 
Paid by Prisoners 


Amount paid toi 
Treasurer. 


Amount of For-ij 
feitures deducted! 
from poy of Po-! 
lice for lost timeJ 
1 


c^ 6 3 « 


1st Quarter 


$2,306 00 
1,993 30 
1,951 00 
1,817 28 

$8,067 58 


81,107 84 
1.353 30 
1,118 75 
1,002 28 

54,582 17 


?;i,107 84 S 614 m 


$ 70 00 

72 50 


2d ^ '' ......::::: 


1.353 30 
1,118 75 
•1,002 28 


469 67 
564 38 
459 50 


3d " 

4th " 


29 50 
43 00 








^ $4,607 17 


•$2,103 47 


? 215 00 



*3^1ie above amount of §25.00 marked unclaimed property is a check 
drawn in favor of City Treasurer in account witii Private Sullivan, his 
name having been entered on Pay Boll by Mistake in March, 1891. 



OFFENCES. 



WHITES 


1 M 




o 


z 


fv 







COLORED 









Abduction , 

Applied for Lodgings 

Assault - 

Assault; Aggravated 

Breach of the Peace 

Breach of Trust. 

Burglary 

Burglary and Larceny 

Car Breaking and Larceny 

Careless Driving 

Carrying Concealed Weapons. 

Cruelty to Animals 

Criminal Neglect of Children. 

Died Suddenly.,., 

Disorder] V Conduct 



Disorderly House, Keeping 

Drunk 

Drunk and Disorderly , 

Escaped Convicts , 

Escaped from Orphan House , 

Escaped from Old Folk's Home. 

Exposing the Person , 

Fouud Sick 

Found In j u red 



2 

129 

29 

13 

61 



1 
127 



150 

209 



13 



1 

10 

114 

70 

99 

6 



11 
4.10 



32 

206 
•> 



1 

6 

133 

9 



44 



o 

1-^2 

159 

87 

219 

7 

1 

19 

17 

30 

30 

5 

1 

19 

698 

21 

102 

498 

2 

6 
1 

12 
131 

48 



11 



162 Mayor Ficl-eni's Annual Review. 

Niirnhrr of Prvfirm^ Arrrf.fed and Omscs of Arrest — Continned. 



OFFENCES. 



Found Dead 

Found Drowned 

Found Wounded 

Firing Crackers, Guns and Pistols 

Foundlings 

Forgery , 

Ganibiing..... 

Grand Larceny 

Higbway Robbery 

House Breaking and Larceny 

Interfering with an Officer 

Interfering with Dog Catcher 

Insane , 

Killed Accidentally , 

Larceny ." 

Larceny of Live Stock.... 

Lodged for ^afe Keeping 

Lodged as Witnesses ,.... 

Lodged on Warrant , 

Lodged on Order of Coroner , 

Lost Children 

]\Ial Practice , 

Malicious Mischief 

Malicious Trespass 

Murder 

Obstructing Sidewalks 

Obtaining Goods and Money under False 

Pretences , ,* 

Kape 



Suicide 

Swindling 

Trespass 

Vagrancy 

Wife Beating 

Keeping Hogs in Cit^' Limits 

Allowing Chimney to take Fire 

Kefusing to pay for having Chimney Swept., 

Dog running at Large and Bite 

Peddling on Streets without a License 

Erecting Aav ning Frame in vio. City Ord's\.. 

Keeping Store open on Sunday 

Bar Room open and selling Liquor on Sunday 
Smoking on the Wharves 



Running Vehicles without a License 

Keeping a Vendor's Policy Shop 

Xot having proper Barricade to Building.... 
Violation of Ord's in regard to Privy Vaults. 
Vio. of Ord's in regard to FiUhy Pri,-rui>.eH... 



WHITES 


COLORED 


Males 

Females 


g 
H 
^ 


U2 

B 
(^ t 



1 ... 



19 



11 



V2 



O 5-1 



G 
3 

18 

15 

1 

4 

65 

45 

8 

16 
14 

5 

J 

230 

9 

37 

27 
74 



36 



12 

25 

30 

2 

4 

76 

66 

14 

16 

38 

3 

7 

2 

282 

9 

46 

36 

91 

3 

p 

i 

1 

2 

18 
8 

10 

4 

5 

6 

75 

30 

6 

11 

39 

17 

4 

1 

5 

45 

2 

17 

1 

3 

2 

19 



Police Deparimeni. 163 

Number of Persons Arrested oul Causes of Arrest — Continued. 



OFFENCES. 



Yio. of Ordinances in regard to Drains 

ViolalioM of Ordinances, Putting out Garbage 

after Hours 

Driving Loaded Dray through King Street- 
Having a Stolen License in Possession 

Opening Street ^yithout a Perniit 

Disturbing Public Worship 

Barbers doing business on Sunday 



WHITES 


COLOEED 






1 01 






o 




CD 


1 




B 


C/2 
O 


1 


E 



Total 



II 



1048 129 1913 385! 3475 



Nuraber of Perscrns Arrested and Causes of Arrest— Continued. 



SENTENCES. 



Dismissed 

Sent to Jail 

Sent to Jail at Hard Labor 

Sent to Trial Justice 

Sent to Hospital..., 

Delivered to Parents....". 

Delivered to Officer 

Delivered to Warrant 

Delivered to Orphan House 

Deferred to Coroner 

Referred to Old Folks' Home 

Deferred to Alms House 

Deferred to County Commissioners. 

Bail Forfeited..... 

Let the Dog be Killed 

Sent Home 



WHITES 


1 1 

COLORED 


05 


1 w 




(P 




CP 


to 

'a 


a 


S 

Ti 


S 


^ 


p^ 


1 f^< 


fc^ 



Total. 



485 


43 


474 


125i 


213 


24 


56G 


140 


30 




185 


1 


118 


ill 


354 


571 


61 


18! 


103 


21 





2 


3 


1 


2 




24 




9 




79 


8 


4 
23 


2 

1 

1 






45 


t 


""l 

88 


1 








27 


74 


21 


4 




1 


1 


4 




5 


1 


1048 


129 


il913 


385 



1127 

943 

216 

540 

203 

12 

26 

96 

6 

75 

3 

1 

1 

210 

6 

10 



164 Afayor Ficken's Amutal Rcvumk 

Police Signal and Telephone Service. 



Alarms responded to by Wagon 

Vragou sent to jail with Prisoners 

^^^ago^ sent to Trial Justice with prisoners. 

AVagon sent to Jiospital , 

Wagon sei.'t with squad to fij'es.. 

Wagou sent with reiier squad 

Wagon sent on special calls'. 



Total, 





a> II 


a 


M fl 


a> c3 


El -S 




H P 


],92.4i 


Distance 


2551 


.. 


198: 




176| 


.. 


58! 




1,168; 


.. 


Itl 


i 


3,001 





Calls sent in by policemen. 



3,594 
010 
396 
369 
118 

4,813 
312 



10,112 
84,121 



Prisoners sent in by \Vagon 2,526 

Reported Cases and brought in b^^ Policemen 949 



Total 3,475 



in addition to the above the following property was re- 
covered : 

One coil rope, 1 pair reins, ] iron pump, 2 coats, 2 vests, 
2 keys, 1 hog, 4 overcoats, 3 jackets, 3 pair pants, 3 vests, 
a valuable pointer bitch, 12 boxes cigars, 2 keys, 1 box 
cigars, block and tackle, 18 head fowl, 2 turkeys, 1 peafowl, 
6 baskets, 1 pistol, 1 gold watch, 1 pair pants, 6 pair cuffs, 
4 umbrellas, 1 lady's muff, 5 white shirts, 10 collars, 4 pair 
cuffs, 1 undershirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 jacket 1 neck tie, 1 
suit of clothes, 1 coat, 1 vest, 4 coats and 2 pair pants, 1 
overcoat, 2 small coats, 4 studs, 1 scarf pin. 1 pair sleeve 
buttons, 1 comb and brush, 1 tooth brush, 1 bottle of tooth 
wash, 2 pair of women's shoes, 2 pair men's shoes, 2 pair 
cloth uppers, 2 grip sacks, 1 pair kid gloves, 3 studs, 1 pair 
sleeve buttons, 1 ]-)air slippers, G collar buttons, 1 neck tie, 3 
pairs cuffs, 1 pair woman's shoes, 4 pair blinds, J 7 pair 
sashes, 1 white rabbit, 3 fowls and 1 turkey dressed, 1 suit 
of clothes, 1 pair she;^rs, 1 pair pants, 1 boat, 1 vest, 1 hat, 
] box eggs, "2 barrels apples, 1 box lemons, 2 boxes oranges, 



Police Depmimmt. 105 

1 bunch keys, 1 silver watcli and cliain, 3 pair pants and 1 
vest, 2 boxc3 ciL^ai's, 2 valises containing clothing. 1 saw, 1 
deck cards, 80 conts, a money drawer, cart license 342, a 
purse containing 50 cents, 1 buggy whip, §17.00 in money, 1 
hat, 1 gold watch and hair guard, 1 bag of seed, a valuable 
Newfoundland dog, 1 lady's gold Vv'atch, 1 adze, J music box 

1 gold vvatch and guard, 1 box embroidery, 1 music, box, 

2 shirts, 1 basket, 1 plate, cup and saucer, 1 pair studs, 2 
sleeve buttons, 1 pair pants, 1 pair blue vases, 1 red damask 
table cover, lot of gambling chips and $1.05 in money, 1 pair 
overhauls, 1 bag of rope, 3 bundles wire fencing, 1 silk dress, 
a red and white cow, 1 pair spectacles, a valuable collie pup, 
2 calve:-3, L bycicle, lot of carpenters' tools, 8 cents, tame rac- 
coon, 2 water spaniel pups, 1 parasol, 1 demijohn whiskey, 
1 bell, 1 hair brush, 1 bunch, of beads, 1 umbre-ha, 1 bundle 
ladies' clothing, 1 double case gold watch, i reticule,! dress, 
1 gold badge, 1 parasol. 1 sheep, 1 basket, 7 pots geraniums, 
lot of jewelry, 9 hams, 1 silver watch, 6 pots geraniums, 1 
pistol, 1 silver watch, foreign coins and 1 pistol, a purse con- 
taining 84.50 and purse containing §7.60, 1 gold watch, 1 
chain, 2 gold watches and 1 guard, 1 umbrella, 1 pistol, 1 
bay horse 1 pistol, 1 bay horse, valise and lot of clothing, 1 
gold watch, 6 pair hose and package of soap, 1 dressing case, 
1 chain and 1 box, contents of purse containing $1.16 currency 

1 white cockatoo, 1 smoking case, 1 gold v;atch, 1 pair 
knucks and lot of clothing, 1 pistol, 1 clock, 3 cabbages, 1 
pair mocking birds and 2 cages for trapping, 1 gold w"atch, 

2 keys with chain attached, 1 gold watch, gold bracelet, a 
lady's gold watch, 1 buggy whip, 1 pistol, 1 silver watch, a 
deck of cards and 27 cents money and chips, coat and vest, 
lot of clothing and a revolver, a pistol, 3 silver watch, a 
valuable greyhound, 2 boxes carpenter's tools, 1 seal ring, 
\ gold pin, 1 silver watch, 1 pistol and 1 gold ring, valise 
and lot of clothing, 1 pearl and gold ring with 6 diamond 
settings, a purse containing sixty dollars, a boy's cap, 2 coal 
scuttles, a buggy robe, a cow, a lot of dresses, valise contain- 
ing lot of clothing, 1 overcoat, a valuable pointer dog, 1 
liolstein cow, 1 buggy vv^hip, 4 keys, coat and pants, black 



IGG Mayor Inc.lcenh Annual Picvicw. 

and tan dog", a valuable setter dog, a mule, cart, truck and 

(x.ritoiito, 1. ...;ii.^;.) uv,;, ^i'v^r \,alch and chain, 1. pair pants 
and knife. 

The whole valued at 83,373 01 

Found open and owners or occupants notified, or watclied 
by the police, 53 stores, 21 offices, 1 laundry, 1 shooting 
gallery, 1 armory, 2 banks, 2 barber shops, i warehouse, 1 
U. S. mail box and 1 saloon. 

Taken up running at large and disposed of according to 
City Ordinance, 2 goats, 35 horses, 11 mules, 23 cows and 
6 horses and buggies. 

Forty-on.e dogs, 4 horses and 2 mules v/ere killed at the 
request of owner or by order of the Recorder. 

Sixty-four alarms of iiro were sounded from the boxes and 
attended by the police. 

Thirteen fires, no alarm sounded, were extinguished with 
the assistance of the police. , 

CHAS. LIEBENROOD, 

Orderly Sergeant, 

I certify that the foregoing is a correct report as per 
Recorder's Morning Reports. 

J. ELMORE MARTIN, 



Chief of Police. i 



Management of ■ Conmcis. 1 07 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR 
THE iMANAGEMENT OF CONVICTS. 



Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1893. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Aldermen of the ' City of 
Charleston : 

Gentlemen : — The Commissioners for the management 
of convicts, beg respectfully to submit their report for the 
term ending Decembei' 31st, 1802, of the condition of the 
convictSj of the guard, the amount of expenditure, and the 
amount and character of the work done by the convicts. 

The Ordinance creating this board, was ratified on June 
16th, 1892, and on the 19th of July following, all arrange- 
ments having been completed, three convicts v,^ere put to 
work on the streets of the city. 

The number soon increased, and, in a short time, the 
effect of their work could be noticed by the improved ap- 
pearance of the streets. The average number at work per 
day, from the 19th of July to December 31st, was fifteen ; 
the smallest number on any one day, three ; the largest 
number, twenty-one. 

The health ot the convicts has been good. The few cases 
of sickness among them being chronic complaints, were not 
contracted in the jail, nor v/hile at work. The out-door 
work seems to be beneficial to their health. 

Cleanliness has been enforced, every Saturday afternoon 
being allowed to the convicts for bathing. 

Clothing and caps have been furnished. It was not 
deemed necessary to furnish under-clothing, as the convicts 
were all sentenced for short periods. 

THE GUARD. 

Only two guardsmen were elected for duty, who, together 
with the Superintendent, we have found a sufficient force 
to guard all the convicts that we have had under our con- 



108 Mayor Fichn's Annual Rcmcw. 

• trol. Three reserve guardsinen, without pay, were elected, 
y.T.^ ^^,^1.1 1,,^ [^Ircod cii duty in case of an increase in the 

. number of convicts. The working of convicts on the streets, 

being a new departure in this city, and the guard having 
had no training or experience in the work, we are impressed 
that their duties have been well performed. 

I- During the term, three convicts have escaped. T^\^ were 

I recaptured. One other made the attempt, but was captured 

before lost sight of. 

* The cost of maintaining the department is shown in the 

following statement : 
I 
I Amount appropriated by resolution of City Council $2,500 00 

I EXPENDITURES. 

|. ' Salaries... ^1,120 01 

I Printing and Stationery.,.^ 28 00 

r Chains, Shacliles, Guns, Hardware, Tinware, 

etc , 179 7t> 

Clothing , 156 71 

Soap , 7 50 

Transporting food 81 50 

Expense of recapture of Frisoner 17 25 

i;. 

I Total amount of Expenditures $1588 73 

^ . — : 

I Balance in City Treasury $ 91127 

?■'■ . • — 

I From the 19th of July to the end of the term, there were 

143 working days, and the average cost for each convict 
per day, has been a fraction less than 75 cents. This esti- 
mate includes the cost of articles that may be called the 
plant, and that will not have to be furnislied again, or not 
for a number of years. ■ ' 

THE CHARACTER AND AMOUNT OF WORK DONE. 

The w^ork done by the convicts was principally ditching 

and the grading of streets in the upper section of the city, 

\ above Shepard street, and under direction of the Superin- 

I tendent of Streets. The following is a list of work done 

I during the term : 

f 1. Crrading and ditching of Boundary Street. 

1 2. Grading of the sidewalks and clearing off grass and bushes on 

Meeting Street, from City Boundary to Shepard Street. 



;;,; '■']) 



Management of Convich. 1G9 

8. Grading and cleaning off grass on Brigade Street, from Meeting 
to Anieriea Street. 

• 4. Leveling of sidewalks and cleaning of King Street, from City 
Boundary to Shepard Street. 

0. Grading and ditching of Romcey Street, from Meeting to King 
Street, and the removal of fence on said street to the proper street 
lines. 

6. Grading and ditching of Simmons Street, from King Street to 
the Marsh, and building trunk in said street. 

7. Laying of drain under King Street roadway, opposite Simmons 
Street. 

Grading and ditcliing of Race, Huger and Moultrie Streets, from 
King Street to Rotledge Avenue. 

The work by the convicts, according to competent au- 
thority, is as well done as by paid labor. The following 
comparative statement will show the amount saved the 
city, had the v/ork been done by the street hands, at the 
rate now being paid : 

15 Laborers at $1.25 per day, 143 days $2,681 25 

2 Foiemenat $3.00 per day 858 00 

Cost of labor of 15 laborers for 143 days, at present rate paid 
by City $3,539 25 

Cost of maintenance of the convicts and guards, average 
15 convicts per day, for 143 days 1,588 73 

Amount saved by convict labor $1,950 52 

. The streets in the upper section of the city were found in 
. a very bad condition, and having been neglected for a long 
period, numbers of encroachments upon the streets have 
I been noticed, and Vv'hen cleaning and grading a street, it 

has been our object to replace fences to the correct lines ; 
this has been done to some extent, but has been and is very 
much retarded on account of the delay of the City Civil 
Engineer, in giving the correct street lines. We, therefore, 
recommend that, should the time of the City Civil Engi- 
neer be taken up in other city work, that a competent Civil 
Engineer, as assistant, be employed, so that the work can 
go steadily on and not compel us to move the convicts from 
place to place, awaiting the lines of the streets. 

Respectfully submitted A. A. KROEG, 

Chairninn Oomviis^ersfor tlie Manageraeni of Co^avicts. 



170 Mayor Fichcnh Annual llevieiu. 

PT T? \ DTTT^T? nr>OTp.TnQ 



COMMISSIOiS^PJFvS MAEIO]M SQUARE, 1892. 



Appropriation ..?500 00 

Expenditures ,...., $ 

Feb. 26. Paid W. W. White for palmetto trees 47 25 

Mch. 1. Paid V/m. Baker, labor for January and 

February 67 66 

April 1. Paid Wm. Baker labor for March 25 00 

April 26. Paid W. F. Paddon repairs wash pave. 1 50 

May 2. Wm. Baker labor for April 25 00 

June 1. Paid Wm. Baker labor for May 25 15 

July 1. Paid Wm. Baker labor for June...... 25 35 

July 23. Paid W. Vv^. White for cutting grass and 

for tree boxes 29 60 

Aug 1. Paid Wm. Baker keep of square 25 25 « 

Sept. 2. Paid Wm. Baker keep of square 25 00 

Oct. 1. Paid Wm. Baker keep of square 25 00 

Oct, 3. Paid John C. Steedman, repairs to movv^er 5 00 

Nov. 1. Paid Wm. Baker keep of square 25 00 

Nov. 3. Paid W. W. White labor 13 25 

Dec. .1. Paid Wm. Baker labor on ground 3125 

Dec. 1. Paid Wm. Baker labor on ground 25 00 421 IG 

■ Balance unexpended , 78 81 

^ 500 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

ASBUIIY COWARD, 

Chairman Commissioners Marion Square. 



Pleasure Grounds, 171 



EEPCIIT OF COAnilGSIONEIiS COLONI AL COMMON. " 

Hon. John F. Ficlcen, Mayor City Charleston : 

De.ve Sir : — The Board of Colonial Common and Ashle}^ 
Hiver Embankment beg leave to submit the following re- 
port for year ending December 31, 1892. Voucliers for all 
amounts expended during the year will be found at office 
of City Treasurer : 

Jau'y 8, 1892, Received from City Treasurer, balance in his 

hands December 31, 1891 $1,052 58 

Received from City Treasurer rent from P. P. 

Toale, April and October 1,000 00 

Received from sale gravel.... 2 25 

Total Receipts ...$2,0-54 83 

Amounts expended during year 1892 : 

Trees planted aroimd Rutledge street Lake $ 33 72 

Labor, cutting grass, weeding lawns, repairing benches, ti-c. 

and painting 398 84 

Laying artificial stone pavements on sidewalks, Beaufain 
street, from Lynch to Rutledge street, Rutledge street, 
from Beaufain to Broad street, Broad street from Rut- 
ledge to Lynch street, around Lynch to depth of Lawn. 
Also raising concrete wall around the Lake from Queen 
street and Rutledge around Broad to Lynch street angle, 
raising and fdling walks around Lake 1,412 74 

Total amount expended |1,875 30 

Balance ? 179 53 

Balance January 1, 1892, in hands of chairman 14 08 

Balance in hands of Board January 1, 1893..... 193 61 

Very respectfully, 

G/A. CTIISOLM, Chairman, 

G. G & A. R. Emho.nJcrfnenit 



172 Mayor Fichiis Annual JReinew. 

REPORT OF THE CO^nilTTEE ON PLEASURE 
. GROUNDS, LOWER WARDS. 

Charleston, S. C, January Jst, 1893. 
To His Honor the Mayor : 

I respectfully submit this Report of the Committee on 
Pleasure Gii^ounds, Lower W^arcls : 

The Battery, with its magnificent water front, beautiful 
oaks and lovely promenade, make it a place worthy of the 
love of the citizens of Charleston, and admiration of oar 
visitors from all parts of this country. It could be made 
much handsomer, but at a considerable expenditure of 
money. With the depression in business and stringency of 
the times, I would advise that extensive improvements be 
deferred for the present. 

During the past year I have had the west wall repaired. 
I removed the wooden railings from the south face and re- 
placed them with galvanized rails, which adds very much 
to the beauty of the place and makes it more substantial. 

I have had all of the benches put in thorough order, also 
the tree boxes and fountains, and had them covered with 
two coats of the best paints, 

. I had the unsightly band stand removed, and a mound 
of Carolina phosphate rock put up in ils stead, which has 
been very much admired for its fascinating ugliness, and 
will be there for future generations to see what was one of 
our chief industries when the supply v/ill have been ex- 
hausted ; but I sincerely trust that many generations will 
have passed before we meet with such a calamity. 

I have had a trellis three hundred feet long built in 
Washington Park with handsome turned posts and gal- 
vanized rails ; have planted twenty-five of the choicest 
varieties of climbing roses ; have repaired the seats and 
painted the fountains. Everything at present is in good 
order. 

The work, of filling Cannonsboro Park with street sweep- 



Pleasure Grounch. 173 

iiip^s has been steadily fioiD^r on, and at very small expense 
to the Committee. The Park, v/hen eompletcd, v/ill add 
much to the comfort of the citizens residing in the Upper 
Wards in the western portion of the city, If the city would 
purchase the vacant piece of ground west of the Park it 
would be a great addition, and add much to the beauty and 
attractiveness of the Park. ♦• 

Enclosed I hand you a financial report of the Committee, 
showing an appropriation of §2,227.32 ; expenditures 
$2,202.60 ; balance to the credit of Committee, |24.72. 

For balance received from appropriation 1891 $ 412 32 

For amount appropriation 1S92 1,815 00 

$2,227 32 
Ck. 

Amount expended on the Battery ^1,391 -32 

Amount expended on Washington Park .« 285 07 

.Amount expended on Cmmonsboro Park 26 61 

Amount exfjended for labor and tools 499 60. 

Unexpended appropriation 24 72 $2,227 32 

Balance to credit of the Committee on Pleasure 
Grounds Lower Wards in hands of the 
Treasurer $ 24 72 

Yours respectfully, 

. R. S. CATHCART, Chairman. 



174 Mayor FichaCs Ammal Revicvj. 



UPPER WARDS PLEASURE GROUNDS. 

CiiAKLESTON, Joiiuarj 24ih, 1593. 

IIo7i. John F. Ficken, Mayor : 

Dear Sir : — Your C'ommittee in charge of Pleasure 
Grounds, Upper Wards, would submit this, their annual 
report, for the year 1892 : 

Appropriation ^600 00 

Expenditures: 

Labor, care of Grounds , $249 10 

Reprdrs, Fountain, Benches, &c 169 40 

Planting trees, Chapel Street Park 6 00 ' 

Sundry materials 14 42 437 92 

Balance not expended , $162 08 

The fence around Wragg Square is sadly in need of re- 
pairs. The Committee would ask an extra appropriation 
for same. 

Respectfully, 

, L. E. WILLIAMS, 

Chairman, 



Puhlic Markets. 175 



:.} 



PUBLIC MARKETS. 

Market Hall, 

Charleston, S. C, January Ist, 1893. 

To the Comraimonefrs of the Public Markets : 

Gentlemen i—In accordance witli law I hereby submit a 
statement of the transactions of this oiBce from January 
J St, 1892, to December 31st, 1892. 



Collections from Fish and Vegetables. $2,044 38 

Centre Beef and Pork Markets 4,478 45 

Upper Market ., 90 00 

Yv^eights and Measures 390 52 

Scale Fees 110 59 

Mt. Pleasant Ferry Co 200 04 

Fish Licenses 332 00 

Ice House Rent Upper Market......... 40 00 

Rent, Market Hall 34 00 

Sundiies 18 72 

Fines 5 00 



17,743 70 



f EXPENDITURES 



Wages to Hands.... $ 7GS 00 

Repairs... 699 09 

Sundry Expenses 282 77 

City Treasurer... 5,993 84 

$7,743 70 



G. W. ROUSE, 
Chief Clerk Markets. 



176 Mayoi' FkJxn's Amiuul Itcriew. 



IHARBOR-MASTER'S REfORT. 



Office of IIarbok-Master, ) 
>ston, S. C, January 2nd, 1893. - \ 



Cliarlei 

lion, Johm F. Ficken^ 2 fay or and Chairinan exr-officio Bocvrd 
of Harbor Commissioners : — 

Dear Sik : — I have the honor to submit the accompany- 
ing report of the arrivals of vessels at this Port for the year 
ending December olst, 1892. This does not include vessels 
under one hundred tons, or Steamers plying between 
Charleston and other Ports in South Carolina. 

I cheerfully avail myself of this opportunity to return 
thanks to Capt. Henry F. Baker, the efficient and estimable 
Chairman of the Board of Port Wardens, for valued favors 
graciously conferred. 

I remain, dear sir, yours respectfully, 

JAMES ARMSTRONG. 

TIarlor-Master, 



Harbor- Master^s Report. 



Ill 



No. I. 



MONTHS 



cc 



W 



H 



Nationality 



January ... 
February , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October .... 
Noveinb.er 
December . 

Totals.... 



26 
2GJ 
26 
26 
23 
22 
21 
25 
25 
25 
28 



298 



404 



65,044 United 
63,819 United 
64,002|United 
67,120|United 
58,7541 United 



51,680 
00,201 
68,04? 
62,087 



United 
United 
United 
United 



67,259 United 
67,990iUn5ted 
62,GG1 United 



14 



'69,564 



States 
states 
States 
States 
States 
State.s 
States 
vStates 
States 
States 
States 
States 



No. 2. 



I 



MONTHS 




8 

o 

ID 


^ 
^ 
« 




o 

1 


Nationality 


January 


1 

5 


1 






1,603 
4,841 


British 


February 






British 


March 










April 




1 






267 
150 


British 


JfXay 






1 


British 


June 










July 


2 
1 
6 
17 
8 
5 

45 




] 




3,450 

1,24S 

9,217 

24,080 


British 


Augu'it 


British 


Senteniber 





1 




British 


October 


Rriti>;h 










10,349 T^riti.sb 


December 


1 

3 






6,260 


British 




*i 


1 


Totals 


61,471 





12 



178 Afayor Ficl-cn^s Annual Jlcvieiu. 

No. 3. 



MONTHS 



W 



Nationality 



January.... 

January 

January .... 
January .... 
February .. 
February .. 
February .. 
February .. 

March 

March ...... 

ISIarch 

ilarnh 

April 

April.. 

April 

'April 

May 

May 

May....... .. 

June , 

June 

July 

July..... 

August 

August 

September 
ISepteiaber 
September 

October 

October 

October .... 
]Sovember.. 
November.. 
November . 
December.. 
December.. 
December.. 
December.. 



Totals 



10 



1,804 

720 
3,030 
2,463 
2,611 
1,275 

893 
1,143 

814 
2,833 

35^ 



GciToan 

Italian 

Spanish 

Norwegian 

Norwegian 

Spanish 

Italian 

Swedish 

Spanish ' 

Norw^egian 

German 



79 Holland 



1,204 
479 
G72 
447 



ISorwegian 
German 
Swedish 
Spanish 



446 Italian 
372 Norwegian 
4541 Swedish 



1,104 
1,021 
967 
813 
470 
1,129 
558 



Swedish 
Norwegian 
Norwegian 
Italian 
Italian 
Norwegian 
Norwegian 
1,36] Spanish 
513 Spanish 
557 Italian 
1,868 Norv/egian 
2,467 Spanish 
398 1 Italian 
642! Spanish 
341JDanish 
420 Italian 
460German 
4561 Norwegian 
763 'Swedish 



52 6 38,869! 



Making a total of 100,340 tons, Foreign. 



Education in CJtarlesion. 170 



EDUCATION IN CHARLESTON. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT ARCHER. 

Office of the Siipeiiintendent City Public Schools 
Charleston, S. C, December 31st, 1S92. 

To the City Board School Commissioners : 

Gentlemen :— I beg to submit herey^'itli, m}^ report for 
the year ending with date : 

ENROLLMENT. 

NimiVjer of white male pupils enrolled 1,247 

Number ofvv'bite female pupils enrolled 1,769 

Total number of white pupils enrolled , ,3,016 

Number of colored male pupils enrolled 1,098 

Numbei of colored female pupils enrolled 1,511 

Total number of colored pupils enrolled 2,609 

Total number of male pupils enrolled 2,345 

Total number of female pupils enrolled 3,280 

Grand total of pupils enrolled 5,625 

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE. 

Number of Avhite male pupils 1,136 

Number of white female pupils 1,675 

Total number of white pupils attending 2.811 

Number of colored male pupils 1,019 

Number of colored female pupils 1,328 

Total number of colored pupils attending 2,347 

Total number of male pupils attending 2,155 

Total number of female pupils attending 3,003 

Grand total of pupils attendinf^ 5,153 

Average per cent, of daily attendance 92 

Number of pupils studying each of the branches taught, 
Alphabet, 876; Spelling, 4,282; Reading, 4,282; Mental 
Arithmetic, 2,537 ; AVritten Arithmetic, 1,745 ; Geography, 
1,745 ; English Grammar, 2,537 ; Penmanship, 4,282 ; His- 
tory of United States, 1,745 ; Higher Branches, 246. 



180 Mayor Fichn^s Annual llccicvj. 

RF«5TG-N.ATT0N OF TKACniF-IiS. 

During the past year the fo]Iowin[': teachers resigned their 
positions in the scliools, Miss M. R. Alston and Miss E. L. 
Gaillard from the Memminger School ; Miss H. L. Bassett 
from the Crafts, I^.liss E. L. Armstrong and Miss A. M. Ma- 
hony from the Gourtenay, Mrs. J. S. Knox from the Simon- 
ton, Miss A. E. Armstrong and Mrs, E. A. White from the 
Shaw. Total number of resignations, 8. 

TEACHEES APPOIXTED. 

^iiss G. E. Barges, to the Shaw School ; Miss J. G. Doty, 
to the Crafts; ^.liss L. i\L Boinest, to the Shaw ; Miss Claudia 
Smith, to tlie Simonton ; Miss E. F. Hayne, to the Gourte- 
nay ; Miss Carrie Weekley, to the Shaw ; total number of 
appointments, 6. 

TEACHERS TRANSFERRED. 

Miss Emma T. Lucas, from the Crafts to the Memminger, 
Miss Elmma Graham, from the Simonton to the Memmin- 
ger, Miss Lilly McCormick, from the Shaw to the Gourte- 
nay, Miss G. E. Burges, from the Shaw^ to the Crafts, Miss 
Louise Kinsey, from the Shaw to the Gourtenay, Miss 
Rosalie Ottolengui, from the Simonton to the Grafts, Total 
number of teachers transferred, 6. 

PRINCIPALS TPwANSFERRED. 

Mr. Edward Carroll, from Shaw to Bennett. Total num- 
ber of principals transferred, 1. 

PROMOTIONS. 

Mr. C. L. Legge, to the principalship of the Shaw School, 
and Miss F. M. Kinsey, to the 1st Class in the Grammar 
Department of the Shaw. Total number of promotions, 2. 

DEATHS. 

Mr. F. W. Clement; Miss S. C. Smith ; the first occurring 
on the 20th of January, 1892; and the last on the 8th of 
November of the same vear. 



Education in Charleston. .181 

Mr. Clement's connection with the Public Schools of the 
city dates as far back as 1869. 

On Hie loth of April of that year, he was elected Vice- 
Principal of the Bennett School and taught there most ac- 
ceptably for nearly thirteen years. 

In January, 1882 he was promoted to the principalship of 
the Meeting Street School, and very soon brought it up to a 
standard of acknowledged excellence. In October of the 
same year he was transferred to the Crafts School and upon 
him was devolved the delicate task of organizing and classi- 
fying all the elements of a new establishment. But the 
genius of the man was equal to the occasion, and by his 
gentle manners and correct deportment he soon obtained 
and held the respect and esteem of his pupils and teachers. 

On the 19th of February, 1885, he was transferred to the 
principalship of the Morris Street, now the Simonton School, 
and v/ith great tact, and remarkable judgment in the dis« 
charge of his duties he kept this school fully up to its pre- 
vious standard and preserved to it, that reputation, which 
it had always so deservedly enjoyed. On the 1st of January, 
1886, he was transferred to the Bennett School and by a 
singular coincidence, after serving as Principal of four dift- 
erent schools, in as many different years, he returned to tho 
school where he had begun his career as a public school 
teacher, to close it by death. 

Mr. Clement was connected with the schools for twenty- 
three years, and during that long period he proved himself 
to be a conscientious teacher, the judicious Principal and 
the upright man. To rare intelligence, he added great 
fidelity, and combined in a remarkable degree, amiability of 
disposition with firmness of character. As a disciplinarian, 
he '^ tempered Justice with Mercy" and controlled by per- 
suasion rather than by force of will. With reverence for 
authority, he was loyal to his superiors. He never pre- 
sumed to question the propriety of an order but wisely 
subordinated his own opinion to that of those who were 
over him. 



:;;;, • ■ ' ]'A*i<^'' 



182 Mayor Ficken's Annual Rcviau. 

With a firm conviction that the essential conditions of 
successful control is in a ready and willing obedjeuce on the 
part of self, he schooled himself while in subordinate posi- 
tions, that in due time he might be qualified for the respon- 
sibility of higher offices. 

As a consequence, he was trained and fitted for the prin- 
cipalships that lie filled, and in the discharge of those duties 
which these positions imposed he achieved a reputation, of 
which any man miglit bo proud. 

I knew him intimately, and during our long and un- 
broken friendship I enjoyed his conhdence to a marked 
degree. 



I , Miss Smith entered the school as a teacher in 1869, and 

•j in October of that year was elected the 8th xissistant at the 

Memminger. 

By successive promotions she rose very rapidly, and in 
October, 1885 was appointed the teacher of the first or 
highest class in the scliool. 
1 In January, 1889, she was put in charge of Mathematics 

in the Senior Department, and with rare fidelity discharged 
, her duties until stricken down by her last illness, 

i As a teacher, Miss Smith was pains-taking and conscien- 

; tious ; she qualified herself for each day's work by 

; thorough preparation, and measured her success by the pro- 

: ficiency of her pupils. Possessed of strong traits of char- 

acter, she caused her influence to be felt, and though of 
calm and quiet demeanor, she was firm and resolute in the 
discharge of duty. Her high sense of honor commanded 
the respect of all whom she taught, and such was their 
confidence in the honesty of her marking, that her awards 
were never challenged. In her daily walk and conversa- 
tion, she exerted a most healthful influence, and this was 
most strikingly exhibited in the characters she was instru- 
mental in forming. 

For twenty-three years she taught in the school which 
f graduates the girls in our public school system, and with a 

I deep sense of the responsibility that attj;iche§ to the teacher's 



Education in Charleston. 183 

office, she consecrated her time and her talents to the noble 
work of teaciiing others. 

She is dead ! but slie yet speaketh in the usefal lessons 
that she taught, and in the beautiful example that she set. 

She is dead ! but she yet liveth in. the memory and in 
the affections of those who knew her best. In her death, 
the schools have lost an earnest and faithful teacher ; the 
community a refined and cultivated lady : the Church a 
consistent and devoted member, 

I regret to report/that there has been a large absence on 
the part of the teachers during the past year, because of 
various reasons, and would respectfully recommend, that 
absence on their part because of personal sickness be ex- 
cused for one school month, and pay allowed, provided a 
physician's certificate be produced. 

In some cities, the pay of an absent teacher is deducted, 
regardless of the cause of absence ; but as this practice 
would work great hardship on our teachers, I can not 
recommend it. 

I regret also to report an. increasing te.ndency towards 
tardiness on the part of the teachers. As to how this can 
be corrected, depends in large degree upon you, gentlemen 
of the Board. The rules requh'e teachers in Primary De- 
partments to be in their class rooms by 8.40 o^clock A. M. ; 
those in the Grammar and High School Departments by 
8.45 A. M., and that habitual tardiness on the part of any 
teacher shall be reported promptly by the Principal to the 
Superintendent, who in turn shall report to the Supervising 
Commissioners. This has been done, but as there is no 
penalty attached to the infraction of the rules, the evil still 
continues. 

I beg to call your attention to the numeiical inequality 
that exists in the classes, notably in those of the Primary 
Departments of all the schools, because of the enforcement 
of the rule requiring 65 per cent, on each and every branch 
as essential to the promotion of a pupil. To remove this 
inequality and to relieve the Primary Departments of the 



1.84 Mayor Ficleiis Awnval Eeineiv. 

pressure on them because of the enforcement of the existing 
rule, i woiiid recommead that the percentage for promotion 
in pJl the scliools except the Memmingcr, be fixed at sixty 
(60) on each study pursued, and that this rule be made 
operative in all examinations for promotion hereafter to be 
held. 

1 would also recommend that examinations may be had, 
and promotions made, of those who meet this percentage, 
and an average of sixty-five (65) per cent on the studies 
pursued by the class to which they desire to be promoted, 
at any time when the Superintendent and the Principal of 
a school may deem it desirable. 

COLUMBUS DAY. 

In accordance with the request of the Commissioners of 
the Columbian Exposition, and in response to the sugges- 
tions of Mayor Ficken, Colun:ibus Day, October 21st, was 
observed in all the schools with appropriate ceremonies. 
Eepresentative citizens manifested their interest by their 
presence, and the Cra^fts School, Girls' Department, was hon- 
ored by Mayor Ficken, Ex-Mayors Couitenay and Bryan, 
the French, the Spanish and the Italian Consuls, and 
other prominent personages. 

Too much praise cannot be given to Miss Wiley, the ac- 
complished head of the department, who happily planned, 
and successfully executed the interesting programme on 
that occasion. 

In conclusion I submit the following statement of re- 
ceipts and disbursements for fiscal year beginning October 
1st, 1891, and ending September 30th, 1892 : 

RECEIPTS, 

R^'ceived from City Treasurer 159,399 60 

Received from sale of books 323 71 

Eecoived from County Tax, refunded.. 3 46 

Cftsh on hand 36 79 

Total of receipts..... 159,763 62 



Educcdion in Cliarleston. 185 

'f ■ ; DISBURSEMENTS. 

I "Paid salaries of Superintendent, Principals, Teachers and 

Janitors $53,732 99 

Paid City Treasurer for collecting 1,000 00 

Paid appropriation to Art School 500 00 

Paid Claftin Umversity (scholarship) ]26 00 

Paid High School, Charleston, (scholarship) 130 00 

Paid for fire insurance '1,137 00 

Paid for Glebe rent 712 72 

Paid for repairs to schools 1,057 SI 

Paid for coal 418 75 

Paid for wood 170 25 

Paid,water rent... 150 00 

Paid gas bills 15 00 

Paid for advertisements , 85 25 

Paid for Poll Tax Lists 75 00 

Paid for books and stationery 118 72 

Paid for incidentals 324 13 

Total disbursements ?59,7G3 62 

Respectfully, 

HENRY P. ARCHER, 

- , ■ Superintendent. 



HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, S. C, April 5, 1893. 
Hon, John F. Ficken, Mayor : 

Dear Sir: — -In compliance with your request for a report 
of the work of the High School for the Year Book of the 
city, I beg to hand you the report of the Principal to the 
Board of Trustees. 

It gives me great pleasure to heartily endorse the views 
therein expressed, and to add that the efficiency of the corps 
of teachers has given groat satisfaction to the Board. 

Permit me to express to the City Council and yourself, on 
behalf of the Board of Trustees, their appreciation of the 
kindly consideration of the City Government towards the 
school. With great respect, yours truly, 

JULIAN MITCHELL, 
President of Board of Trustees. 



186 Mayor Fid-en's Annual lieviciu. ■ 

The High School of Charleston, S. C-, 1 

December 31, 1892. [ 

The President and Trustees of tlie High School of Charleston : 

Gentlemen:— The following statement shows the number 
of pupils enrolled and in attendance during the several 
sessions into which the school-3'ear is divided : 

January 3, to March 31. 

First Class 13 Pupils 

Second Class 16 

Third Class 41 

Fourth Class , 85 

Preparatory Class 22 

Total... 177 

April 1, to June 30. 

First Class 12 Pupils 

Second Class 13 

Third Class 39 " 

Fourth Class 80 • 

Preparatory Class 27 

Total 171 •• 

October 2, to December 31, 

First Class 7 Pupils 

Second Class 23 - 

Third Class BQ " 

Fourth Class 67 " 

Preparatory Class 18 

Total 181 •• 

The Fourth Class during the winter and spring sessions 
was the largest that we have ever enrolled, forming three 
sections. The Third Class is also unusually large, and 
forms two sections, the number being more than could be 
properly taught without such division. The Second Class 
is nearly double that of last year. The First Class is 
smaller than we have had for several years. Its record for 
scholarship, however, surpasses that of any. of its prede- 
cessors. 



Education in CharlcsiorL 187 

Good work has been clone in every department of the 
•bcbool. 'ine teachers have, without exception been earnest 
and conscientious in discharging the duties assigned them, 
and the progress made by their pupils is evidence of the 
most practical kind that they have not labored in vain. 

In June last, Mr. Wm. D. Gaillard, who for six yeais had 
been in charge of the department of French and German, 
withdrew to enter upon the practice of the lav/.' He had 
been a very efficient teacher; and the classes under his care 
shovved the painstaking training which he gave them. The 
Trustees were fortunate in securing as his successor in the 
department of IModern Languages, Mr. Clarence A. Graeser, 
Jr., a graduate with first honor of the High School, and 
also of the College of Charleston, who brings to the work 
assigned him not onl}^ high attainments, but also an ex- 
perience of several years in the practical work of the school- 
room. 

The increase in the number of pupils necessitating an 
increase in the teaching force of the Scliool, jMr. Jno. D. 
Miiller, another of our graduates, was elected assistant 
teacher. 

At the commencement held June 24, the follovvung mem- 
bers of the First Class, who had accomplished the course of 
study of the School, and had met every requirement for 
graduation were awarded diplomas : Edward P. Ball, Claude 
Burckmyer, F. Eldon Dibble, Donald McKay Frost, James 
P. Gibbs, Jr., Lewis M. Hamlin, Jno. S. Moseley, Richard 
B. Smyth, Legare Walker, Clarence E. Wilkins. Six of the 
graduates are pursuing their studies at the College of 
Charleston, three are at other colleges, one has entered upon 
business life. 

The Peabody medals were awarded to Claude Burck- 
myer, of the First Class — next in merit Lewis M. Hamlin — 
and to Geo. I. Middleton, of the Second Class — next in 
merit, Robt. Lee Lewis. The Ferguson Colcock Conduct 
Medal was by the choice of the members of tlie First Class, 
and v/itli the approval of the teachers, assigned to F. Eldon 
Dibble. The Peabody medals were presented by his Honor, 



I 188 Mcujor Ficlxn^s Annual Review. 

Mayor Ficken, and the Conduct medal by Julian Mitchell, 
Lsq., lijo i rcoiduijo oi ihc xiusiees oi the School. 

Tlie commenccinent exercises drew together a large audi- 
ence, and the young gentlemen wlio had appointments to 
speak all acquitted themselves handsomely, and were 
. worthy recipients of the enthusiastic applause accorded 

^ them. 

The year has been one of the most successful in the his- 
tory of the School. Its prosperity empliasizes the necessity 
j for a new school-house. Tlie favorable response of the City 

\ Council to the memorial of the Trustees setting forth this 

\ ■ necessity will, I trust, lead to practical results in the near 

future. ■ Chai'leston needs—Charleston must have — a High 
School building v;ortby of the name. No investment will 
yield a larger revenue to the city than iliG one which gives 
to the boys who are in a few years to be the custodians of 
its interests the opportunity and inducement to pursue their 
, studies beyond the limits of tlie common school course. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VIRGIL C. DIBBLE, 
Principal of the ITkjK School of Cliarlesian, 



COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON. 

Charleston, S. C. June 15th, 1893. 

Hon. C. K Simonton^ President Board of IVustees, College of 
Charleston, S. C. 
Sir : I transmit herewith tlie annual report of the College 
of Charleston for the year ending «^'i^^c- 27th, 1893. The spe- 
cial reports of the several members of the Faculty are also 
submitted, so that the amplest and most definite informiation 
is at the disposal of tlie Board, in reference to the work 
achieved and the results accomj'iL-hed in every sphere of our 
collegiate administration. Jt is my aim and endeavor to 
present, .as far as pcssil'l'*, evcy detail of our academic 



Education m Charlcdo'iu 189 

lifp. tbaf, mn.y servo to exhibit our needs, to indicate our 
progress, or in any manner to illustrate our condition. 
First of all, it is recommended by the Faculty that the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts be .conferred upon the follow- 
ing gentlemen, who have fully complied with the condi- 
tions of our collegiate law, and are in every sense worthy 
of the proposed distinction : Mr. Charles E. Lawrence, Mr. 
Mitchell K. Mazyck, Mr. Trapier K. Marshall and Mr. Hugh 
S. McGiliivray. It is also recommended that the degree of 
Master of Arts be conferred upon Mr. AVard B. Coe, a grad- 
uate of 1890. Mr. Coe has submitted an admirable disser- 
tation upon the Province of Juries in Criminal Cases- He 
earned an honorable position in the War Department, as 
the result of a competitive examination, and after gradu- 
ating with distinction at the Columbian Law School, was 
admitted to the Bar of Maryland and has begun the prac- 
tice of his profession in the City of Baltimore. His fame 
and fortune are, in my judgment, already assured. His disser- 
•tation has been cordially commended by one of our leading 
law revievvs. As the reports of my colleagues exhibit the 
condition of their respective departments, I devote myself 
to the discussion of the general interests of the College, and 
to the conditions of those peculiar spheres of study which 
are entrusted to my personal supervision and direction. My 
department embraces the complex subject of Universal 
History, the Philology and Literature of the English 
Language, and the Science of Psychology. In one of the 
larger institutions of New England or the North, the work 
included in this enumeration would be assigned to four or 
five instructors, in accordance with the recognized principle 
of our time in regard to specialization and differentiation 
of labor. Despite the immense range of subjects, and the 
adverse environment v/hich they logically involve, it may 
be said without hyperbole or extravagance, that each one 
has been faithfully and diligently compassed during the 
four years at my disposal. 

The critical investigation of the philology of our lan- 
guage has been easily co-ordinated with the study of its 



190 Mayor McJccn^s Annual llevieiu. 

. • ■ rich and versatile literature, and the work accomplished, 
especially in the sphere of pure literature, is far in advance 
^' of that wli'ich is achieved in the ordinary or typical Ameri- 

can Colle^cre. 1 o illustrate the truth of this general propo- 
sition, I may state that the present graduating class has 
read ond critically investigated since tlie completion of their 
|; Freshman year. Hale's Longer English Poems ; the Pro- 

logue to the Canterbury Tales; the Knight's Tale; Seven 
' Plays of Shakespeare— -Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry VIIT, 

Antony and Cleopatra, Tlie Tempest, Henry Y, Julius 
i Ga33ar ; the minor Poems of Tennyson ; several of Brown- 

ings most characteristic creations, and has studied minutely 
and thoroughly such supreme achievements of our elegiac 
|; poetry as Milton's Lycidas, and Tennyson^s In Memoriam. 

' In History I have used Freeman's admirable Outline, sup- 

< plementing and elaborating it at every point in the develop- 

: ment of the subject. In Philology, Meikle}^] oh n's V/orks 

' is my basis ; but it is only a basis, as the range of the science 

\ proceeds immensely beyond the limit indicated in the text. 

I In Psychology I have used the clear and discriminating 

Manual of Dr. Porter, formerly of Yale University. 
i^ In reference to the general condition, prospects, etc., of 

|- the College, I can at least assert, without fear of contradic- 

tion or in any event of confutation, that the Faculty is 
accomplishing all tliat is possible under the adverse sur- 
, roundings and depressing environments against which they 

have to struggle, almost uncheered by sympath}- or by 
encouragement in any form whatever. A college or univer- 
sity professor in nearly any situation in the South that may 
be designated, except the University of Virginia and the 
Johns Hopkins University, is entitled to be ranked among 
the martyrs and heroes of intellectual history. No lan- 
guage can express with too much vividness or in too bold a 
light, the apathy, inertness and chilling indifference of our 
[ Southern society to the advancement and expansion of pure 

; culture in science, art or literature. In my ov.'n judgment, 

■' unless our people are aroused to a thorough conviction of 

their peril and their responsibility, there is rear--on to fear 



Ech' cation in Charlcdon. 191 

that within the uext half century large areas of our Soutli- 
crn territory will relapse or descend into a condition of intel- 
lectual darkness scarcely above the plane of barbarism. Ma}'' 
Heaven forefend the condition of degeneracy which is here 
described as possible ; but the dispassionate investigator of 
historic evolution can allege no reasons for its non-realiza- 
tion, save such as lie within the will—the resolution— the - 
intelligence of our own people. 

I beg leave especially to emphasize the dcplorahle condition 
of our chemical and physical laboratory, still in tlie state 
of chaos in which it was left by the destructive earthquake 
of August, 18S6. Dr. Chazal, our capable and enthusiastic 
Professor in charge, was compelled to abandon it several 
months ago, and avail himself of the facilities offered by 
the excellent laborator}^ of Dr. C. U. Shepard. In its pres- 
ent derangement it is inipossihle for any one, hovrever com- 
petent or devoted, to conduct the work of this magnificent 
and expanding department with even moderate efficiency or 
mediocre results. Faraday, llelmholtz, or Sir William Thom- 
son, would be unequal to such an achievement. It is my 
earnest hope that the matter wdll receive the most thorough 
consideration at the hands of your Board, and that some 
means may be devised by which cosmos may succeed to and 
transform the existing order of chaos. The elective system 
in the mild and judicious form in v/hich it was introduced 
into the Coliege, has already, I think, indicated the Avisdom 
of its adoption. It has proved a happy compromise, an 
adjustment of intension and extension, and while affording 
ample opportunity for the development and culture of native 
predilections or peculiar appetencies, it still averts the griev- 
ous movement of our time and country in the direction of pre- 
mature specialization, that potent and fruitful source of 
sciolism and empiricism in medicine, law, divinity, and 
preeminently in the profession of teaching. 

The future of the College, its achievements, its beneficent 
influence, its stimulating power, all rests with the commu- 
nity and the State. Colleges and Universities are the 
trustv/orthy and faithful reflex of the mental and spiritual 



.ft . V-i 



192 Mayor FicJcen^s Annual Bevieiv. 

character of the peoples among whom they. exist and from 
whom they draw their nutriment and their life. The intel- 
lectual rank, potentiality and emprise of the communities 
in which they are planted, are graven upon their walls and 
wrought into their foundations. -.No form or phase of our 
historic evolution more accurately ' holds the mirror up to 
nature.' 

Our Annual Commencement will occur on the last Tues- 
day in June, 27th. 

I trust that the Board of Trustees v/ill be largely and 
liberally represented upon that occasion. 

I am, with sincere regard, 

HENRY E. SHEPHERD, 

President College of Charleston, 



Ordinamcs PMliJicd Durmij the Yem- 1893. ]y3 



ORDINASCKS RATiFiED DURING THE YEAR 1892. 



AN OBDINANCE ^o Amend the General Ordinances by 

STRIKING OUT SECTION 124 OF THE SAME, AND INSERTING A 

NEW Section in lieu thereof. 

Be it Ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen Id City Council i^s- 
senibled, That Section 124 of the General Ordinances be, and the 
same is hereby, stricken out, and the following inserted in lieu 
thereof: - 

Section 124. It shall be the duty of every owner of a lot, who 
may re.side thereon, and of the owner of every vacant lot, and of 
every lot not having a known lessee or tenant residing thereon, and 
of every les.-.ee, tenant or occupant of every lot, to cause said lot and 
the stables, cov.' houses and outhouses thereon, to be carefully swept: 
and all the dirt, scraps of paper, dung, soot, ashes, carrion, garbage, 
shreds, oyster shells, or other filth or rubbish, and all sweepings 
and scraps of paper from shops and stores, to be placed in barrels, 

1 boxes or other suitable receptacles, and carried out every day (Sun- 

days excepted) by the hour of 7.30 o'clock A. M., from the first da.y 
[ of May to the first day of November in every year, and by the hour 

I of 8.30 o'clock A. ]\I,, from the first day of November to the first day 

I - of May following, and the said boxes, barrels or receptacles, with 

I their contents, upon being carried out as herein above required, 

j^ shall be placed at the edge of the pavement, opposite the respective 

ilots, but so as not to obstruct tlie gutter, and in a situation from 
whence the said contents may be conveniently removed by the scav- 
enger department : Provided, however. That all trees and cut- 
I tings from trees, limbs of trees, and all shrubs and weeds may be 

I placed in heaps in the street at the edge of the pavement opposite 

said lots, every day, excepting Saturdays and Sundays, after 6 
o'clock P. M. from the first day of May to the first day of November 
in every^ year, and after 5 o'clock P. M., from the first day of Novem- 
ber to tb.e first day of May, followiug in every year, and any person of- 
fending herein by emptying any dirt, filth, scraps of paper, garbage or 
other offal iu any street, lane, alley or open court, or placing any bar- 
rel, box or other receptacle containing dirt, filth, garbage or other oflTal 
in any street, lane, alley or open court, after the hours above named, 
or on Sundays, shall be subject to a fine of not less than two nor more 
than five dollars for each and every offence, to be imposed by the 
Recorde'- or the Board of Health, or b3'' any Court of comx^etent 
jurisdiction before which the case may be brought. 
i 13 



194 Mayor FicLcn^s Annual licvieiv. 

And any person or pGrsons wlio shall scatter the contents of any 
uarrui, oox or leceplubie ior p;arbage piacea ai tiie edge of any pave- 
ment as hereinabove required in the street, gutter or on the side- 
walks in any street, alley, lane or open court, shall he subject to a 
fine of not exceeding five dollars for each and every ofi'ence, to be 
imposed by the Recorder or by the Board of Health, or by any Court 
of coinpetent jurisdiction before which the case may be brought. 

Ratified March 8, 1892. 



AN ORDINAjMCE to keokganize the system of medical at- 
tendance UPON the Poor of the City of Charleston, and 
TO alter and amend Chapter VI of the Revised Ordinances 
entitled " Health Department," by repealing all Ordi- 
nances heretofore passed, Amending Sections 214, 215, 216, 
217, 218 AxNTD 219, BY repealing said Sections and by insert- 
ing NEW Sections in lieu thereof. 

Be it Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charles- 
ton, in City Council assembled, that all Ordinances heretofore passed 
amending Sections 214, 215, 216, 217, 218 and 219, Chapter VI of the 
Revised Ordinances, entitled "Health Department," be repealed 
that said Sections be stricken out and the following inserted in lieu 
thereof to wit : 

CITY DISPENSARY PHYSICIANS. 

Section 214, Clause 1. That immediately upon the ratification 
of this Ordinance City Council shall elect tw^o Dispen- 
sary Ph.ysicians, in addition to the four now in office, so that with 
the said two additional physicians so to be elected, there shall be six 
dispensarj^ physicians for the year 1892,, who shall have charge of 
the indigent sick of the city, and whose term of oflice, the four now 
in office as well as the two additional physicians now to be elected, 
shall expire on the second Tuesday in January, 1S93, and at the elec- 
tion of city officers in January, 1893, and in each succeeding year. 
City Council shall elect six Dispensary Physicians, who shall have 
charge of the indigent sick of the city. 

Clause 2. That the City of Charleston shall be divided by the 
Board of Health into six health districts, and that the said Board 
shall assign to each of the Siiid physicians one of the said health 
districts. 

Clause 3. That the Physicians so assigned shall reside and shall 

have their offices within tlie districts to which thoy are severally as 
signed, shall be subject to the provisjoiis of the General Ordinances 



Ordinaiiccs Haiificd Durhirj ilie Year 1S02. 105 

and all the ainciulinents tberelo relating to city oOicers, and during 

tiio loiUi uj" LhoJi )r.ci'\iCQ ^Ijiill noi bold any othur professional office 
or appointment v/itbont the consent of the Board of Health. 

Clause 4. That a Dispensary rhysician changing bis residence 
from the district to which he was assigned thereb^^ vacates his otltice, 
and an election to fill such vacancy will be held by the City Council. 
That no temporary substitute shall be made without the authority 
and concurrence of the Jioard of Health. 

Clause 5. That no physician elected under tliis Ordinance shall be 
allowed under any circumstances to hold the office of a City Dis- 
pensary Physician for more than four years, nor shall any physician 
who has held the ottice of City Dispensary Physician for four years 
under any previous Ordinance be eligible for election under this 
Ordinance. 

See. 215. That these Dispensary Physicians shall answer calls at all 
hours, and shall, without charge, attend the indigent sick, resident 
in their respective districts, and shall always carry with them a 
pocket case of medicines for use in emergency. They shall have 
power to issue per] nits for the admission into the wards of the City 
Hospital of such indigent sick as in theirjudgment may require PIos- 
pital care and treatment. 

Sec. 210. That all coinplaints originating in the care of the indi- 
gent sick of the city shall be adjudicated by the Board of Health, 
under such rules as they may from time to time establish. 

Sec. 217. That each Dispensary Physician shall make a tabular 
report monthly to the Board of Health, and he shall also make a 
quarterly report to the said Board of all important matters connected 
with his office and duties. 

Sec. 218, Clause 1. That the salary of the said physicians shall be at 
the rate of six hundred dollars per annum, with an additional allow- 
ance of one hundred and fifty dollars for horse feed, and one hundred 
dollars for office rent; being a total of eight hundred and fifty dol- 
lars per annum, payable monthly, for each of the said physicians. 

Clause 2. That the Board of Health shall elect annually six apoth- 
ecaries, one for each dispensary district, and each of the said apoth- 
ecaries shall have his place of business within the district for which 
he has been elected. These apothecaries shall furnish such medi- 
cines and fill such prescriptions for the indigent sick as shall be 
ordered by the Dispensary Physicians of their respective districts, 
and for such medicines and service they shall receive the sum of five 
hundred dollars each per annum, payable monthly. 

Sec. 219. That tUe Board of Health shall prepare such rules for 
the guidance and control of the Dispensary Physicians and apothe- 



19G Mayor Ftckenh Annnal Jlcinew. 

caries aa in their judgineiit shall be most conducive to the interests 
of the sick poor of tlie city. The Board shall also furnish all blanks 
for necessary reports. 

All Ordinances and parts of Ordinances in conflict with the pro- 
visioiis of this Ordinance are hereby repealed. 
Ratified April 26, 1892. 



AN ORDINANCE to rei\eai, an Okdinance entitled " Ax 
Okdinance to amend Chapter 16, Section 551, of the Gen- 
eral Ordinances, relating to Sunday," Ratified July 10, 
1SS8, AND TO a:mend Section 551. 

Be it Ordained hi/ the Mayor and Aldermen assembled, That ''An 
Ordinance to an3.end Chapter 16, Section 551, of the General Ordi- 
nances, relating to Sunday," be and the same is hereby repealed, 
and that Section 551 of said Ordinance bo amended by the Insertion 
of the words, "excepting drugs and medicines, milk and ice'' after 
the word " day" in the fourth line, so as to read as follows : 

Section 551. No person or persons whosoever shall publicly 
expose for sale, or sell in any sliop, warehouse, or otherwise, 
any goods, wares or merchandise whatsoever upon the Lord's Day 
excepting drugs and medicines, milk and ice ; and every person so 
ofTending shall for every such offence be. liable to be fined in any 
sum not exceeding twenty dollars. 

Ratified April 26, 1892. 



AN OEDINAKCE to amend Chapter V of an Ordinance en- 
titled -'An Ordinance to Revise, Codify and Amend the 
Ordinances of the City of Charleston in force on the 1st 
DAY of July, A. D. 1SS2," RATiFrED the 26th day of Septem- 
ber, A. D. 1882, BY striking out Sections 175, 176, 177 and 
180 and inserting new Sections in lieu of said Sections so 
stricken out. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston, 
in City Council assembled, and by tlie authority of the same, That 
Chapter V of an Ordinance entitled " An Ordinance to revise, codify 
and amend the Ordinances of the City of Charleston in force on the 
1st day of July, A. D. 1882." ratified the 26th day of September, A. D. 
1882, be amended by striking out Sections 175, 176, 177 and 180, and 
inserting new Sections in lieu of said Sections so stricken" out as 
follows : 

Section 175. The '• fiushing" shall be done as follows, viz. : In fair 
weather and between sunrise and sunset, if the state of the tide per- 



Ordinances haiificd During ihc Year 1892. 197 

mits : the gates shall be closed at high water. Wlieii the lido has 
fallen, and before the return of the next tide, all the gates shall he 
opened for tlv3 water to rush out, and the gates shall not be closed 
again until the following day. 

Sec. 176. At night the gates sliall always he kept open, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Mayor or the Committee, and the keeper of 
the tidal drains y/ill be held to strict account for any violation of 
this Section, 

Sec. 177. AVhenever heavy falls of rain occur the gates must be 
kept open to avoid overflowing or straining the drains and to give 
free exit for the rainfall. 

Sec. 180. Each "man-hole" and corresponding "sand-pit" 
shall be designated in the report by numbers, and entered in tlie 
record book of the keeper ot tidal drains. 

Rajified May 10, 1S92. 



AN ORDINANCE to amend an Ordinance entitled "An 
Ordinance to amend Section 269 op the General Ordi- 
nances OF THE City of Charleston, entitled City B.ospital, 
ratified May 11, 1886." 

Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston, 
in City Council assembled, and by the authority of the same, That 
the Ordinance to amend Section 269 of the General Ordinances of 
the City of Charleston, entitled City Hospital, ratified May 1], 1SS6, 
and ratified May 13, 1890, be amended by striking out the word 
*' twelve" and inserting the word "ten" in lieu thereof in the first 
paragraph of said Ordinance. Also by striking out the words "elected 
by City Council at the first regular meeting held next after the rati- 
fication of this Ordinance, and every two years thereafter, two of 
whom shall be members of the Medical College of South Carolina 
and three members of City Council," in the first paragraph of said 
Ordinance, and in lieu thereof inserting the words ''appointed by 
the Mayor and confirmed by City Council, who shall hold their office 
for four years from the date of their appointment." 

Also, that the second paragraph of said Ordinance be amended by 
making the word "agreement" "agreements," and by adding the 
words, "and the Charleston Medical School" after the words "Medi- 
cal College of the State of South Carolina," wherever ih^y occur in 
said paragraph, and by striking out the words " of date l^th day 
of May, 1S80." 

Ratified May 24, 1892. 



198 Mayor Fichenh Ammal Picvieiv. 

AN ORBIISTAXCE to create a Board for tite MAXAOEMEiST, 

CocjiUin AlM) CAJiE UF CO-N \ JC^TS ;.k:s1EM0ED TO HARD LABOR ON 
THE PUBLIC STREETS, SQUARES, AELE\>3 AND LANES OF THE ClTY 

OF Charleston fob violations of City Ordinances, or for 

OTHER OFFENCES. 

JJe it ordained hy tJie Mayor and Aldcrracn of the Cify of Charleston 
in City Council assembled, and by the authority of the samci 

Section l. That immediately after the ratification of this Ordi- 
nance, and at the first regular meeting in June in every second year 
thereafter, the City Council shuli elect a Board consisting of two 
Aldermen and three citizens; who shall constitute a Board of Com- 
missioners for the management, custody and care of convicts sen- 
tenced by the Courts or by the municipal authorities to hard labor 
on the public streets, squares, alleys and lanes of the City of Charles- 
ton ; which Board shall have the raana(;ement of all funds appro- 
priated for the same. The members of the said Board shall hold 
office for the full term as hereinabove prescribed, and until their 
successors shall have been elected. 

Sec. 2. That the said Board shall have power to make ail sucli 
rules and regulations as in their judgment may be necessary for 
their own government and for the custody and care of the said con- 
victs ; Provided, however, that the said rules, so far as the working 
of the convicts is concerned, shall not coniiict with the laws of the 
State or with any of the rights, powers and duties of the superin- 
tendent of streets and of the committee on streets, as defined and 
fixed by existing City Ordinances, or Ordinances which may be 
hereafter enacted ; and provided further, that such rules and regu- 
lations shall be approved by City Council. 

Sec. 3. The Commissioners shall hold a regular meeting of the 
Board at least once a month, and such special meetings as they may 
deem necessary. A majority of the Board shall constitute a quorum. 
At the meeting for organization, or as soon thereafter as the Board 
shall deem proper, and at the first regular meeting in Januarj^ of 
each succeeding year, the Board shall electa superintendent and five 
guardsmen, if so many be deemed necessary, to constitute the guard 
for said convicts, and from time to time shall fill ail vacancies in 
the said guard by election after ten days' notice of the same : Pro- 
vided, however, that all elections by the said Board shall be re- 
ported to City Councilat its next meeting thereafter for confirmation 
or rejection. 

The Board of Commissioners shall at any time have the power and 
authority to dismiss the superintendent or any of the guards for 
misconduct in office, incompetence, inability to perform his or their 
duties, or for any other cause whatsoever, and the party or parties 
so dismissed shall be- paid for the actual time of their service at the 
annual rate provided for in tliis Ordinance. 



Ordinances Batified During the Ye(iT 1892. J.99 

Sec. 4. The salaries and pay of the said guard for convicts shall be 
Uji loiiowjj : 

To the Su]X'rintendent, nine hundred dollars per annum. 

To the guards, each six hundred dollars per annum. 

The salaries and i)ay aforesaid shall be paid monthly by the City 
Treasurer out of the appropriation made by City Council for that 
purpose. 

Beo. 5. The duties of the Superintendent and the privates of the 
guard shall be fixed and defined by the Board of Commissioners. 
The^^ shall obey all the rules and regulations of the Board. 

The Superintendent and each member of the guard is hereby 
vested with all the powers and authority of a policeman of the City 
of Charleston. 

The Superintendent shall enforce obedience to all rules and regu- 
lations for the government of the guard, as well as for the custody, 
care and management of the convicts, and shall make a monthly re- 
port to the Board of Commissioners. He shall give bond in the sinu 
of one thousand dollars, with two good sureties, to be approved by 
the Board of Commissioners, for the diligent and faithful pen'brm- 
ance of the duties of his office. 

Sec. 6. The Board of Commissioners shall, on or before the first 
day of January of each year, make a report to the City Council of 
the condition of the guard, of the convicts, of the amount of expen- 
diture and of the ajuount and character of work done by the con- 
victs during the year. 

Ratified June 16, 1892. 



AN ORDINANCE to provide for issuing coupon bonds, %vith 

INTER r:ST AT THE RATE OF 5 PER CENTUM FEB ANNUM, FOR THE 
PURPOSE OF TAKING UP OR EXCHANGING THE 7 PER CENT COUPON 

BONDS MATURING IN 1892, 1893, 1891, 1895, 1896 AND 1897: 

Section 1. Be it ordained hy the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Charleston^ in City Council assembled, That in pursuance of an Act of 
the General Assembly entitled "An Act to authorize the City Coun- 
cil of Charleston to issue coupon bonds, at a rate of interest not ex- 
ceeding 5 per cent, per annum, for the purpose of taking up or ex- 
changing the 7 per cent, coupon bonds of said city, maturing in 1892, 
1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897," approved December 16, A. D., 1891, 
the Mayor of the City of Charleston be and is hereby authorized and 
directed to issue coupon bonds, to be countersigned by the city 
treasurer or by the deputy city treasurer (as the case may be,) under 
the seal of the city, with interest at the rate of 5 per centum per 
annum, payable semi-annually, for the purpose of paying or ex- 
changing the same at y,Lir for the 7 per cent, coupon bonds, respec- 
tively maturing as follows : In 1892, seventy thousand (?70,000) dol- 



200 Mayor Flclxri^s Annual Jicview, 

lars; in 1803, S3 xty-tv/o thousand one hundred (562,100) dollars; in 
1894, seven ly-tb re. e Uiou-.^ud seven hundred (873 700) dollars ; in 1S95, 
ninety-one thousand fjve hundred ($91,o00) dollars; in 18QG, sixty- 
seven thousand (:i^G7,000) dollars; in 1897, twenty thousand ($20,000) 
dollars, aggregating three hundred and eighty-four thousand three 
hundred ($384,300) dollars, and to be substituted for the said 7 per 
cent, bonds so maturing, as aforesaid, in all respects, to bear date as 
of the date of said payment or exchange, and to be made payaWe in 
thirty years from their respective dates. 

Sec. 2. That the said bonds shall not be taxable by the City of 
Charleston for Siuy purpose whatsoever, and the coupons shall be 
receivable in payment of taxes due to the said city. 

Sec. 3. That the principal and interest of said bonds shall be pay- 
able at the office of the city treasurer of tlie City of Charleston. 

Katified August 12, 1892. 



1 AN OK.DINANCE to permit tite sa.le of ice ciieam, soda 

; WATEFl, PBUIT, BREAD, TOKAGCO AND CIGAflS ON SUNDAYS AFTER 

i THE HOUR OF 12 M. 

; Beit ordained hi/ the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston, in 

; Council assembled, That from and after the ratification of this ordin- 

ance it may be lav^-ful for the proprietors thereof to open ice cream 
I gardens or ice cream shops, soda water fountains, fruit shops, bread, 

tobacco and cigar shops on Sundays alter the hour of 12 M,, and to 
sell ice cream, soda water, fruit, bread, tobacco and cigars therein. 
Ratified August 12, 1892. 



AN ORDINANCE to prohibit the biding of bicycles on the 

SIDEWALKS AND IN THE PUBLIC PARKS OF THE CITY OF CHARLES- 
TON, AND TO ENFORCE THE USE OF BELLS AND LIGHTS ON BICYCLES. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston in 
City Council assembled, That it shall be unlav/ful for bicycles to be 
used or run on any of the sidewalks or in any of the public parks 
(excepting Marion square) in the City of Charleston. 

That all bicycles shall be provided with a bell, and at night with 
a light, in order to give suflicieut notice to pedestrians of the approach 
of the vehicles. 

Any person or persons violating the provisions of this ordinance 
shall on conviction before the Recorder be fined in a sum not exceed- 
ing five dollars or be imprisoned for a term not exceeding five days. 

That all ordinances or parts of ordinances conflicting with this 
ordinance, be, and the same are hereby repealed. 

Ratified November S, 1892. 



Ordinmices Ratified During the Year 1892. 201 

AN OKDINAXGE to a^iend section 13 of the revised ordi- 

.:a:sul.5 of ijiu k^ity oi^' Charleston relating to the salary 

OF the MAYOR. ' 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of. Charleston in 
City Council assembled, and by the authority of the same: 

Section 1. That Socfiou 13 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Charleston be amended by striking from the second line of said 
Section 18 tiie words ''four thousand" and inserting in lieu thereof 
the words "thirty-five hundred," and by adding at the end of said 
section the words "payable monthly," so that said section as amended 
will read as follows : 

"Section 13. For his services the Mayor shall receive an annual 
salary of thirt.y-five hundred dollars, payable monthly." 

Section 2. That this ordinance shall take elTect Irom and after 
the first day of January, A. D. 1893. 

Ratified December 80, 1S92. 



AN ORDINANCE to Erovide for paying the city of Charles- 
ton 7 per cent bonds maturing 1st OCTOBER., 1892. 

Be it ord.aih.cd hy the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston in City Coun- 
cil assembled , Thut the sum o? fifty thousand dollars derived from 
the sale of the new city 5 }-ier cent, bonds be, and the same is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying a like amount of the City of 
Charleston 7 per cent, bonds which matured on the 1st October, 
1892. 

Ratified December 30. 1892. 



I. 

AN ACT TO Designate the Holidays in the County of 
Charleston to be Observed in the Acceptance and Pay- 
ment OF Bills of Exchange, Bank Checks and Proimissory 
Notes. 

Section 1. Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the State of South Carolina, novr^met and sitting in 
General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, that the follow- 
ing days and half days, namely: National Thanksgiving days, aU 
General Election days, the first day of January, the twenty-second 
day of February, the fourth day of July, the twenty-fifth day of 
December, the first Monday in Spptember, and every Saturday from 
12 noon until 12 midnight, which is hereby appointed ahalf holiday, 
shall for all purposes v/hatsoevcr as regards the presenting for pay- 
14 



:!•(.; > .M 



202 Mayor Ficken's Annual Review. 

inent or acceptance, and of the protestinj^ and giving notice of the 
^^;..i,..v>..r r>-r i,i];. ,,f ^.y/:]-.,..^,--.^ I.Tj^k c}it;c].y and }>j'OJnissory notes 
made after tlic p:".i.-^[igc of tliis Act, be treated and considered as the 
lirst d'ly of the \. eok, comn-^-only called Suiiday, and as public holi- 
days or half holidays, and all such bills, checks and notes, otherwise 
presentable for acceptance or jx^ynient on the secular or business 
day next succeeding such holiday ; but in the case of a half holiday 
shall be i>resentable for acceptance or payment at or before twejve 
o'clock noon of that day : Pkovided, However, that for the 
purpose of protesting or otherwise holding liable any party to any 
bill of exchange, check or x^romissory note, and which shall not have 
been paid before tv\-elve o'clock at noon any Saturday, a demand of 
acceptance or payment thereof may be made and notice of protestor 
. dishonor thereof may be given on the next succeeding secular or 
business day; and l^RovUfED, Fukthe.r, That when any person 
shall receive for collection any check, bill of exchange, promissory 
note, due and presentable for acceptance or payment on any Satur- 
day, such person shall not be deemed guilty of any neglect or omis- 
sion of duty, nor incur any liability, in not presenting for payment 
or acceptance, or eoiiecting, such check, bill of exchange or promis- 
sory note on that day : and Peovided, Further, That in constru- 
ing this Section, every Saturday, unless a whole holiday as afore- 
said, shall, until twelve o'clock noon, be deemed a secular or busi- 
ness day. 

Section 2. ^Ybenever the first day of January, the (22) twenty- 
second day of February, the fourth day of July, or the twenty-fifth 
day of Pecember shall fall upon a Sunday, the Monday next follov/- 
ing shall be deemed a public holiday for any and all of the purposes 
aforesaid : Provided, However, That in such case all bills of ex- 
' change, checks and promissory notes made after passage of this Act, 
which would othervrise be presentable for acceptance or payment 
on the said Monday, shall be deemed to be presentable for accept- 

1 ance or payment on the secular or business day next succeeding snch 

I holiday. 

Section 3. All bills of exchange, checks or promissory notes 
made after the passage of this Act, which by the terras thereof shall 
be payable on tlie first day of the week, commonly called Sunday, 

I shall be deemed to be payable on the next succeeding secular or 

f business day. 

Section 4. The provisions of this Act shall apply to Charleston 
County only. 

Section 5. This Act sliall take effect on the tenth day aiter its 
passage, as certified by the Secretary of State. 
5. Section 0. All Acts or parts of Acts inconsistent with this Act 

f be, and the same are hereby, declared repealed. 

Approved Dec, l-lth, A.' P., 1S92, (21 Slat. ISS.) 



r 



Ordinances Raiified During the Year 1892. 203 

^\IT Av^;T'jiu h'.,.^^'ii S^^ltion 1,02G of the Gknerai. Statutes 
Bet.atixg to the Public Schools in the City of Ch akleston. 

Section 1. BE IT ENACTED by the Benate ond Houso of Rcp- 
reseDtatives of the State of South Carolina, now met and sitting in 
General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That Section 
],026 of the General Statutes of this State, wherein provision is made 
for the City Board of School Commissioners of the City of Charles- 
ton and a special levy in aid of the City Scliools, be amended by 
striking out the last sentence in said Section, which is as follows : 
^'The City Treasurer shall receive out of tljis fund one thousand dol- 
lars annually for all services in receiving and disbursing the school 
fund," and by inserting in lieu thereof the following: The City 
Treasurer shall receive out of this fund annually for his compensa- 
tion for all services in receiving and di>3buisiug the school fund the 
sum of five hundred dollars. 

Approved December loth, A. D., 1892. (21 Stat. 110.) 



Ill- 



AN ACT TO Amend an Act Entitled '*An Act to Amend an 
" Act Entitled 'An Act to Repeal an Ordinance to Pre- 
" VENT the Erection of Wooden Building's and to Provide 
" GtReater Security against Fires, and also Certain Por- 
" TiONS OP the Acts of the General Assembly Referring to 
'•the Erection of Wooden Buildings in the City op 
" Charleston.' " 

Section l. BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the State of South Carolina, now met and sitting in 
General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That an Act 
entitled "An Act tu amend an Act entitled 'An Act to repeal an 
*' Ordinance to prevent the erection of wooden buildings and to pro- 
" vide greater security against fires, and also certain portions of the 
*' Acts of the General Assembly referring to the erection of wooden 
"buildings in the City of Charleston,''' approved December 23rd^ 
3886, be, and the same is hereby, amended, by inserting the words 
*' and on the East side of ^^leeting Street and North side of George 
" Street at the North-East corner of George and Meeting Streets, for 
''a distance of one hundred and tv/elve (112) feet on Meeting Street 
"and seventy-five (75) feet in depth on Geori>:e Street and the same 
" depth on the North line of said lot," afier the words "All lots 
" abutting on the East and A¥est sides of King Street and Meeting 



204 Manor FicJ:en's xinnual licinew. 

A/ 

" St reot between Broad and Queen Rlrects," in the last jjrovho in 
said .Act. 

f>i:cTio:N 2. That this Act shall take eilect immediately U])on its 
approval by the Governor. 

Approved December 10th, K. D., 1892. (21 Stat. 191) 



IV 

AN ACT TO Authorize the School Coimmissioxer of Charles- 
ton COTTi^TY TO APPLY ANY BALANCE IN THE HANDS OF THE 

Treasurer to the credit of the County School District's 

AT the expiration OF THE REGULAR SCHOLASTIC YEAR TO THE 

payment of clai^vis against the public schools op the 
City of Charleston. 

. Section 1. BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the State of South Carolina-, now met and sitting in 
General A.ss^embly, and by the authority of the same, That the School 
Commissioner of Charleston is hereby authorized and empowered to 
apply an3^ balances left to the credit of the County School Districts 
of said County in the hands of the Treasurer at the expiration of the 
regular scholastic year to the payment of any clain^s against the 
public schools of the City of Charleston : Provided, In no case shall 
the scholastic year in the County School Districts be curtailed to 
less than eight months. 
Approved December 20th, A. D., 1892. (21 Stat. 190.) 



APPEND 



A. 



THE SOUTH CAROLINA MHTTARY ACADEMY. 



The history of this well known institution is closely con- 
nected with many of the most memorable events in the Lis- 
tory of the State. The " intended insurrection " of a portion 
of the slave population in 1822, had demonstrated the iieces- 
sity, and led to the establishment of a strongly built arsenal 
in Charleston, for the storage and proper care of a large 
supply of arms and ammunition. This arsenal was subse- 
quently named in legislative acts " The Citadel." The ex- 
cited agitation of the Nullification question, led to the fur- 
ther enlargement of the State's armament, with a strength- 
ening of the State's guard at the Citadel in 1832, and the 
establishment of an Arsenal, with a guard, at Columbia, in 
1833. Tl^ese two companies of State guards were main- 
tained by an annual appropriation of .$24,000. In 1841, 
the Nullification excitement having been allayed by the 
" Compromise Act of Congress," the Hon. .John Peter Rich- 
ardson, then Governor of the State, conceived and urged the 
plan of substituting for the guards of enlisted men, a corps 
of .young men, who, while perforo^ing the seivice of guards, 
should receive a broad and practical education. This states- 
manlike scheme was carried into effect by an Act of the 
General .Assembly, December 20th, 1842. The able Board 
of Visitors appointed under this Act, set themselves at once 
to the task of organizing and inaugurating the work of the 
two Academies, and by the 20th of March following, the 
Faculty and Students of both institutions were at their post 
of duty. The course of studies and disciplinary training 
were closely modeled on those of the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, and the people of the State soon 
recognized the fact, that a new and valuable educational 
power had been developed among them. 

The popularity of the academies increased year by year, 



208 Appendix to Year Booh. 

as the merit of their wurk became better known. It was 
boon lonnci better to co-ordmale the two into one system, 
thaii to coDQiTct tliem separately. Accorclirjgly the young- 
est, or fourth ch:\ss, which v/as always the largest, was sen.t 
to the Arsenal in Columbia for their first year's training, 
and was then transferred to the Citadel to complete the re- 
maining three years of the course. The steadily ijicreasing 
demand for the admission of pupils, necessitated at the 
Citadel, first the addition of a third story, then the building 
of two wings, and lastly are-arrangement and architectural 
improvement of the interior. At the Arsenal, the erection 
of a central building of three stories to connect the two rec- 
tangular two storied buildings of the original plan, and, 
subsequently, the erection of a separate building for the 
accommodation of the academiic oflicers. The " ripeness of 
tim.es'' which brought about the Ordinance of Secession, 
and the resumption of all the attributes and powers of sov- 
. ereignty by the State, found the ample barracks of the 
. Military Academy v>^ell filled with high-spirited, patriotic 

f youths, governed and. instructed by an able Faculty, selected 

Yv'ith a single exception, from the list of her own graduates. 
; But a short interval elapsed before the teaching, the train- 

f ing and the influence of the institution were to be put to the 

crucial test. On the 9th of January, 1^61, Major P. F. 
Stevens, Superintendent of the Citadel, and a graduate, in 
command of a detachment of Citadel cadets, manning a 
battery of 24 pounders on i\Iorris Island, di'ove off the 
steamer Star of the West, thus firing the first hostile shot 
;; . in the War of Secession. On the 9th of May, 1865, Capt 

I J. P. Thomas, Superintendent of the Arsenal, and likewise 

I a graduate, with the cadets of his command, had a skirmish 

with Stoneman's raiders, near V/illiamston,S. C, thus firing 
; the last shot of the war, delivered by any organized body 

t of troops east of the Mississippi Iliver. Between these two 

\ dates, what a tragic history was enacted! On the mural 

I tablets in the Citadel rotunda, bearing the simple but 

\ pathetic inscription, " Died for the Southern Confederacy,'' 

the names of fort;y -three grfiduaiGS/nearly one-Jifth of the ivholc 



The South Carolina Miliiary Academy. ■ .209 

number, aric] of seven nnder-p:rrid nates, arc to bo fourjd en- 
graved. 

The result of the war suspended tlie operations of the 
Academy. The Citadel was occupied by the Federal troops 
as barracks until 1SS2. 

In the burning of Columbia by Sherman's army, all the 
buildings of the Arsenal were destroyed, except the officers' 
residence^ Vvhich* was fitted up as the Governor's mansion, 
under the administration of Governor Scott, and still re- 
mains in use as such. 

An Act of the General Assembly, approved January 81st, 
1882, authorized the Board of Visitors to re-open the Mili- 
itary Academy as soon as possession of the building could 
be obtained. On the 2nd of February, the evacuation of 
the Citadel by the Federal troops having been completed, 
the Boaj'd took possession of the premises, and proceeded to 
take proper measures for re-opening the School. 

The Board of Visitors at this time consisted of Gov. John- 
. son Hagood, Chairman. 

Rev. S. B. Jones, D. D., Col. Edward Croft, Col. H. A. 
Gaillard, Gen. C. I. Walker, and Gen. A. M. IManigault, ex 
officio, all of whom except the last, were graduates of the 
Academy. 

The first year of the restored Institution opened with 
great eclat on tlie 2nd day of October 1882, with a Faculty 
consisting of Col. J. P. Thomas, Superintendent and Pro- 
fessor, Capt. Wm. Cain, Professor, Lieuts. P. P. Mazyck and 
H, T. Thompson, Assistant Professors, and Dr. F. L. Parker, 
Surgeon, and v/ith- an enrollment of 189 Cadets. From 
this time down to the present, the Academy has 
steadily proceeded with its work, keeping abreast with 
the progressive changes of the times, and making its influ- 
ence felt in constantly widening circles. In March 1802 
two stories of the Citadel main building, containing Pro- 
fessors' apartments, offices and all of the Cadet dormitories, 
with most of their property, were destroyed by fire ; but 
this calamity which, for a moment, seemed appalling, really 
served to show how deeply the Academy had fixed itself in 



210 Appendix to Year Booh. 

ihe j^ffoc^ior!? o^ c^r poop^e. From all quarters there caine 
pourijig in expressions of sympathy and tenders of assist- 
ance. The citizens of Charleston threw open their private 
houses, puhlic halls, armories, in fact every available build- 
ing they had to shelter the unhoused officers and Cadets. 
The Roper Hospital, the Medical College building, and the 
premises of the Old Marine Hospital were selected as the 
most suitable of all the places offered, and by night the 
corps were comibrtably located in the new quarters. In a 
few days after the fire the sum of nearly §1,100 v;as placed 
in bank subject to the order of the Superintendent, by the 
" Lady Friends of the Cadets," for the purpose of replacing 
the lost clothing of the Cadets. The City Council promptly 
voted the sura of Sl/'^OO of which $500 was to be applied to 
replacing the cosily drawing instruments lost by the Cadets, 
and the remaining $1,000 to effect certain contemplated 
improvements in the restored building. In connection 
with this action the following proceedings were entered 
upon the records of the Council : 



THE CITY COUNCIL OF CHARLESTON. 

City of Charleston, 
Executive Department, March 24th, 1892. 

At the regular meeting of the City Council of Charleston, 
held on 22d instant, Aldermaft Baer submitted the follow- 
ing preamble and resolutions in refe'i^ence to the fire at the 
Citadel : 

The Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City Council 
assembled, cannot permit so distressing an occurrence as the 
burning of the roof, and the consequent damage to the 
upper rooms of the Citadel building, to pass without voic- 
ing the feeling of profound regret felt throughout this com- 
munity, and, as they believe, fully shared by the great ma-^ 
jority of the people of South Carolina, at this most unex- 
pected and most unfortunate disaster. 



The Souih Co.wUna Military Academy. 211 

FouTi'-cd in tbc wise fovctlion[^bt ol a, previous generation, 
the Academy has been reorganized and maintained by the 
State authorities and people of Souili Carolina under altered 
public conditions, yet, if possible, even more urgently needed 
now than at its origin, fifty years ago. This is the belief of 
thoughtful citizens everyv.diere in the State, who gravely 
consider the coming years and the value of this higher edu- 
cation in shaping tliat future. 

The City Council of Charleston have an abiding faith that 
these thoughts are common with all reflecting citizens, with- 
out regard to temporary political differences, from the Blue 
Kidge to tlie sea. While deploring this loss and its conse- 
quent temporary inconveniences, the City Council desire to 
place on the public records of the city its high appreciation 
of the conduct of Colonel Coward and tlie Academic staff 
during the conflagration and since, their v.'ise judgment in 
making temporary arrangements, equal to the prompt con- 
tinuance of the course of stadies and the good order of the 
institution. 

AnotJier conspicuous feature of this calamnity has been 
the manly, self-sacrificing deportment of the young gentle- 
men—Cadets — representatives of every County of South 
Carolina. They have given evidence of their high citizen- 
ship in thr' exhibition of perfect discipline and manly bear- 
ing under severe trials, wliich are not only honorable, per- 
sonally, to each Cadet, but which attest, as well, the value 
of the military training which develops these high charac- 
teristics, and through them gives promise of future lives of 
usefulness and honor to State and country. They have 
given fresh proof that '^difficulty is opportunity." There- 
fore, be it . 

Resolved, That the fullest sympathy of the City Council 
of Charleston is respectfully tendered to Col. Coward and 
the Academic Board and to the Cadets of the South Caro- 
lina Military Academy, for their dignified and manly bear- 
ing under the recent trying circumstances of serious losses 
and temporary discomforts so suddenly encountered, which 



212 Ap2)cndix to Year Book 

■^■' 
r)rp.<^p]^is■ f^ notable example of good conduct to all our peo- 
ple to be emulated in time of future trouble. 

Besolved, That the City Council of Charleston expresses 
the belief that their fellow citizens will esteem it a high 
privilege to relieve any and all personal losses by tliis con- 
flagration as far as possible to ascertain them. 

B^csolvedf That these proceedings be spread upon the jour- 
nals and published, and tho.t ofncial copies be prepared and 
sent to each member of the Academic Board and to each 
Cadet, with the assurance of the high regard and esteem of 
the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston. 

Besolved, That his Honor the Ivfayor be authorized and 
requested to confer with the authorities of the Academy, 
with full pov;er to act in all m,atters relating thereto as lie 
may deem best. 

Alderman ZimmeruQan Davis seconded the resolutions. 
He said : 

Mr. Mayor: It seems superfluous to add anything to 
what has been so well said in the preamble and resolutions 
just presented, but I cannot resist the impulse to bear fur- 
ther testimony to the esteem in which the Faculty and 
Cadets of the South Carolina Military Academy are held by 
this entire community, and the profound regret which v/as 
universally expressed when it v/as known that the building 
was in flames. This noble institution has become very dear 
to the hearts of our people and we are proud of it. For two 
generations the Citadel Academy has been filled with young 
men from every County in our State, and it is worthy of 
public record that in all that time there has never been 
known a single instance of unbecoming or ungentlemanly 
conduct on their part while free from the restraint of the 
barracks. In many of the great colleges of our land the 
high. spirit and the boisterous pranks of youth have fre- 
quently brought the students into collision with the citizens 
and civil authorities, and in many cases causing ill feeling 
between them and a desire that such, institutions bo removed 
from such cities. This, I repeat, has never happened with 



The South Carolina Military Academy. 213 . 

South Carolina Cadets. Wl)eii granted leave to visit they 
have ever been v^-eleomed in the houses of our people, where 
lifelong friendship's have been formed, and when they have 
graduated and returned to their homes they have left be- 
hind them only pleasant memories, and have taken with 
them a lasting love for the old ''City by the Sea," which 
have repeatedly found expression in binding together .the 
whole State, from the mountains to the sea, in a common 
biotherhood. 

I sincereh^ hope that the beautiful building Vvull soon 
arise from its ashes, and that the South Carolina Military'' 
Academy will continue its career of honor and usefulness 
to the remotest generations. 

It gives me profound pleasure to second the resolutions.'* 



The chajige of quarters, though inconvenient in many 
respects, did not materially interrupt the Academic work of 
the year, for the classes completed in a satisfactory manner 
the studies prescribed in the course. Through the prompt 
co-operation of the Board of Visitors, the Governor, the .In- 
suiance Companies and the contractor, tlie work of restora- 
tion was completed in time for the opening of the term 
bveginning October the first. During Gala Week, in recog- 
nition of this happy event, the oflicers and Cadets gave a 
brilliant reception to the Board of Visitors, the City Council 
and a host of interested friends. Many addresses of felicita- 
tion were made, and the Library, the Laboratory and the 
bright clean quarters were freely opened to inspection. 

As the end of the 50th year since the Academy was 
founded was now approaching, measures were taken for a 
Jubilee Celebration, and the day selected therefor vras the 
22d of February, 1893. This Semi-Centennial was a mem- 
orable one in the experience of our city, as will be seen 
from the following extracts from the pamphlet published by 
the Association of Graduates: 



214 Apjjendix to Year Book. 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE DAY. 



FEBRUARY 22nd, 1893. 



The Association of Graduates, many Graduates and Ex- 
Cadets, assembled in the Chapel at the Citadel at 11 o'clock, 
with tlieir guests. At 11.30 they moved out, escorted by 
the Washington Light Infantry and the Corps of Cadets S. 
C. M. A., the procession under the command of Maj. A. W. 
Marshall, AV. L. I., the guests in carriages. 

CHARLESTON'S GREETING, 

All along the line of march there were throngs of 
Charlestonians wdio are always delighted to do honor to the 
Cadets. The sidewalks w^ere thronged and out of the 
windows beamed the happy faces of the fair sex who had a 
smile for the Boys in Grey. The parade was a memorable 
one. The \V. L. I. never looked handsomer, or marched in 
1^ better form. The Cadets marched with their wonted military 

■ mien ; their uniforms and accoutrements were bright and 

■ clean and the corps presented a handsome appearance. 

'i ' Down King sireet the parade marched. The line turned 

■ down Hasell street to Meeting, to the Grand Opera House. 
When the party reached the Opera House the W. L. I. and 
the Cadets formed in line to salute the distinguished guests. 
The guests formed in column, headed by Governor Tillman, 
who was escorted by Gen. Huguenin, and marched down 
the line to the entrance of the Hall. 

When the military arrived at tha Opera House there was 

^ already an anxiously avraiting crowd. Chairman Gadsden 

t • and his Committee, to v/hom too much credit cannot be 

given, had every arrangement made for the reception of the 

[; visitors. Charleston came out in force to do honor to the 

\ Citadel and to its noble history, and the spacious theatre 

I 



r-';v" 



The South Carolina Military Academy. 215 

was filled to overiiov/ing ^Yith a cultivated and refined audi- 
ence. ' 

Among those who participated in tbs ceremonies of the 
day were : 

Graduates and Ex-Cabets: — W. S. Allan, A. N. Alex- 
ander, Ed. Anderson, 0. J. Bond, S. C. Boylston, J. T. Bur- 
dell, Ellison Capers, Amory Coffin, Asbury Coward, R. T. 
Crawford, J. F. Culpepper. li. \Y. DeSanssure, F. J. Dever- 
eux, R. Y. Dwight, Haveloch Eaves, F. M Farr, C. S. 
Gadsden. W. D. Gaiilard, S. F. Garlington, Wm. Godfrey, J. 
M. Gray, A. G. Guerard. Johnson Hagood. R. 1. Plasell, 
T. B. Haynsworth, J. V/. Hudson, E. C. Hughes, David 
Huguenin, T. A. Huguenin, A. M. Kennedy, F. M. Robert- 
son, J. M. Robertson, A. S. Salley, H. C. Schirmer, I. G. W. 
Steedman, B. B. Smith, S. P Smith, W. E. Stoney, 
T. E. Strother, E. M. Whaley, C. I. Walker, G. G. Wells, J. 
B. White, Robt. Aldrich, J. W. Barnwell, A. M. Brailsford, 
W. E. Breese, Palmer Brown, J. H. Boiiknight, John G. 
Capers, R. L. Clarkson, J. Y. Culbreath, G. E. Davis, L. L. 
Gaiilard, W. A. Gibbes, E. M. Grimke, J. G. Holmes, J. S. 
Horlbeck, C. Ed. Johnson, C. B. Lanneau.G. W. Klinck, 
G. B. Lartigue, Thos. PI. Paw,W. A. Leland, G. A. Lucas, J. 
J. Lucas, S. D. Lucas, A. H. Mazyck, J. R. Mew, J. S. Mixson, 
T.M. McCutcheon, A. J. Norris] Ralph Nesbit, J. R. Padgett, 
E. F. Parker, F. L. Parker, J, B. Patrick, Joshua Lockwood, 
A. G. Magrath, Ben Martin, C. G. Matthews, B. F. McCabe, 
E. C. McCarty, P. K. McCully, J. L. Oliver, J. R. Pringle. 
E. H. Prioleau, A. M. Salley. W. M. Steinmeyer, W. W. 
Simons, R. A. Smyth, E. P. Waring, Walter Willinlan. 

Faculty S. C. M. A. as Follows : — Col. Asbury Coward, 
Lieut. J. A. Towers, iNlajor St. James Cummings, Major C. 
L. Reese, Major R. G. Thomas, Capt, P. P. Mazyck, Lieut. O. 
J. Bond, Lieut. J. T. Coleman, Lieut. C. E. Johnson, Dr. F. L. 
Parker, Lieut. W. W. West. 

Corps of Cadets S. C. M. A., and officers. 

Washington Light Infantry Battalion. 



216 Appendix to Year Book. 

Guests :-~-Gov. B. R. Tillman, Mayor John F. Fickcii, 
Cell. J. V/. T.Iooie, Chin. KSenate }>Iii. Coin., Gen. II, L. Farley, 
Adgt. vvd In?. Gen., Col. A. IsL Youjnans, Chm. House Mil! 
Com., Capt. F. V. Abbott, U. S. A. 

BoAED OF ALDEmrEN !— Geo. W. Williams, Jr., A. A. 
Kroeg, Fc. S. Cathcart, J. II- Stein meyer, C. S. Gadsden, Dr. 
H. Baer, T. G. Main. J. B. Reeves, J. I). Murphy, H. Haos- 
loop, T. S. Wilbur, L. E. V7iliiams, A. B. Murray, Zimmer- 
man Davis, C. Frisius, J. C. Tiedeman, P. Broderick, Dr. 
T. Grange 8imons, L. D. Mahlstedt, I. V. Bardin, A. J. 
Eiley, \V. F. Strong, L. C. A. Roessler, H, L. Cade. 

Mr. A. M. You mans, Capt. J. E, Enslow, Capt. Walter. 
Dr. Brackett, Dr. Horn, Capt. Inglesby, Mr. Virgil C. Dib- 
ble, Capt. J. E. Cogswell, of the Washington Light Infantry, 
Mr. W.^ M. Con nor, Air. T. R. McGahanTMr. A. S. J. Perry, 
President Shepherd, of the College of Charleston, jMr. W, 
E. Holmes, Mr. J. H. ^lallonee, Major G. Lamb Buist, the 
Rev. H. A. Whitman, Major J. C. Hemphill, of the News 
and Courier, Ex-Mayor Geo. D. Bryan. Ex-Mayor W, A. 
Courtenay, the Rev. Mr. Wells, the Rev. Theo. Porter, the 
Rev, Mr. Pott, of China, the Rev. Dr. A. T. Porter, Capt. 
W. M. Muckenfuss, Lieut. S. J. Jenkins, Lieut. J. D, 
Kelly, Lieut. W. L. Salas, Lieut. F. H. Honour, Adjutant 
A. L. Bristol, Major A. W. Marshall, Lieut, J. F. Corcoran, 
of the Washington Light Infantry, the Rev. Dr. Robert 
Wilson, the Rev. J. L. Stokes, Major Franz Melchers, the 
Rev. C. S. Vedder, Major Benj. Mantoue, and Mr, S. C. 
Welch. 

THE EXERCISES. 

Gen. Johnson Hagood, the gallant and devoted Chairman 
of the Board of Visitors, and the President of the Associa- 
tion of Graduates presided at the celebration and introduced 
the speakers. There was no unusual display — nothing for 
effect, it was a plain but brilliant programme, worthy of 
the memorable occasion. .. 



Tlte So'UJi Carolina Mllitarij Academy. 217 

Shortly before Doon Gen. Ilngood called upon the Rev. 
R. P. JoTV'S, T). O.^ PI ember of Board of Visitors, of Colum- 
bia; to open the meeting with prayer. He delivered a fer- 
vent and touching prayer'for the grand old institution, such 
as would naturally come from the heart of one who has 
spent years of time in working for the Citadel. 

THE VOICE OF A VETEKAN. 

At the conclusions of the prayer, Gen. Hagood arose and 
said : " 

The South Carolina Military Academy has completed the 
fiftieth year of its existence. The half century of its life has 
embraced the years Uiost eventful in tlie annals of its mother 
State. Born when the social organization under v/hich our 
fathers lived had reached the culmination of its peculiar 
prosperity, baptized in the blood of revolution, staggering 
to its feet at the disastrous close of the contest, and resuming 
its work with inherent vitality and unconquerable spirit of 
its blood ; again, as of yore the Academy holds its proud 
place among the educational institutions of the South. 

Holding fast to all that was good which it imbibed at its 
mother's breast; broadening its views to meet the require- 
ments of a new departure ; availing itself of all the appli- 
ances and methods wliich progess has evolved, it fulfills its 
purpose. It tenders to the children of its care the priceless 
gift oi a liberal education, tempered to a field of effort, not 
in the cloister, but in the earnest pursuits of active life, and 
governed by the high and noble aspirations of the soldier 
and the gentleman. 

In all the walks of life the sons of the Academy have 
found their place. As physiciims, as lawyers, as engineers, 
as architects, as merchants, editors, and railway ofhcials, as 
instructors of youth, as clergymen, as agriculturalists, as 
officers of the State, and as soldiers, they have made their 
record. 

From the shores of the Pacific, from the distant prairies, 
15 



218 Appendix to Yca'r Booh. 

from Northern maris, and from all over our fair So at hi and, 
they come to-day or send loving greeting to their Alma 
i\later. 

Alas that some 

"At their life's blood noble cost, 
Pay for a battle nobly lost. 
And lie beneath Virginian hills, 
And some by green Atlantic rills ; 
Some by the waters of the West, 
Were miiiad unknown heroes rest." 

They too are in spirit with us here. 

My friends, the Military Academy welcomes you to her 
jubilee in this fair city — a home in which bright eyes and 
kindly deeds are all she has ever known. 

THE SEMI-CENTENNIAL ODE. 

In introducing the *'Poet" of the day, Major St. James 
Cummings, of the Academy, Gen. Hagood remarked : 

It is my pleasure and happy fortune to introduce to you, 
as the poet of this auspicious occasion, one who holds and 
worthily fills, an Jionored place upon the Academic staff. I 
have the pleasure of introducing, Major St. James Cum- 
mings. 

The highest expectations of the audience were realized 
in the beautiful ^'Oile" of I\Iajor Cummings. It was delivered 
with the warmth of feeling and genuine eloquence of a 
man whose life is devoted to the institution of which he had 
the privilege of writing. 

We have only space to quote the closing lines : 

/ With closing strains, hearken to this appeal ; 
To our devotion, temper thy critic's rule. 
For here in song vre chant our commonAveal. 
Mock me not, stranger, for this modest school 
That houses but its hundreds at a time, 
Lacking its acres of roofs and rare bazars. 
And storied groves that spread o'er flanking miles ; 
And yet she takes the mead, and smiles. 
And knows of nothing that her heart debars 



The South Carolina Mlllkinj Acaderay, 219 

From fond applause of panegyric rhyme. 
But is not sh(^ tlie dearer to our hearts 

jiiveu A))- hei hiuublc ^l(.>:^: of goU'en arts? 
There are great mothers wliom their worthy sons 
Call not Cornelia when they speak the name ; 
And through small v.indov/s for heloved ones 
Have wondrous mornings brought inspiring flame. 

Mistress of Jubilee, tliatfills the hearts who love thee, 
Be thy young sentinels ne'er taken from their duty ; 
Thy zeal for truth be constant, and as clear as heaven above 
thee, 
' And centuries aye keep measuring thy glory and thy beauty. 

COL. THOMAS' HISTORICAL ADDRESS. 

There v/as a genuine disappointment tliat Col. J. P, 
Thomas v/as not present to deliver the address which he 
had prepared while on his bed. But the feeling of regret 
was in. a great degree diminished, when it was known that 
the Rev. Dr. Ellison Capers was to read the historical ora- 
tion, for no one has a place nearer the liearts of Charlesto- 
nians than Dr. Capers. 

In announcing the orator of the da}', Gen. Hagood said: 
Coh John P. Thomas, who has served the Academy from 
cadet to superintendent, and now holds a place upon the 
Board of Visitors, was selected as the orator of the day. An 
unfortunate accident confines him to liis bed. As ever, 
prompt and faithful, he has sent bis address, vrhich will be 
read by one who, a soldier of the grey and a soldier of the 
Cross, needs no introduction here. I have the pleasure of 
introducing to you the Rev. Dr. Capers. 

^yhen Dr. Capers arose he was greeted with a round of 
applause. He said that he brought a token of love from a 
friend. ^'You will find it full of love, full of devotion, full 
of truth and full of patriotism, as it comes from the bed of 
one who loves the Citadel. It was prepared by a brave 
heart and a loyal vrorker. 

The Address, though full of interest, is too long to be 
quoted here in full, so we content ourselves with extracts 
from the closing. part: 



220 Appendix to Year Book. 

*' If now the question should be asked, whence came the 
povvcr wielded by die Academy, what the moral forces tliat 
have wrought her usefulness and her glot}^ her civil and 
her military victories, the ansvv^er, we hold, will not be 
hard to make. 

That which has conduced to the end she has reached, is, 
first, to be found in her course of studies. Moral and Polit- 
ical Science, Mathematics and Engineering, Chemistry and 
Physics, English Literature and History, French and Ger- 
man, Drawing and Bookkeeping, Military Science and 
Tactics — these departments, with the subjects they cover, 
make a curriculum, compact, comprehensive, logical, and 
serviceable — one leading to trciining rather than to learning, 
to knowledge of things, rather than knowledge of words, to 
an equipment i/se/Vi. rather \\'\2ir\ prnamenfal. 

That which has conduced to the end she has reached is, 
secondly, to be found in her disciplinary methods. The 
Citadel has always taught the worship of duty and the in- 
violability of law— dut}^, too, in small things, as well as in 
large things. 

She has insisted on the majesty of minutiae, on the wis- 
dom of linking attention to details with regard for general 
principles, and hence her discipline, has ever tended to the 
formation of sound habits, and to a prudent, cautious, self- 
control. But not only is duty demanded in small as well 
as in large things, it is also demanded in all its varied forms. 
" Duty never to be neglected " is one of the maxims of the 
Eegulations governing the School — and duty for the sake 
of duty, is the sentiment enjoined upon the Cadet. 

That which has conduced to the end she has reached is, 
thirdly, because the Christian graces and the precepts of 
morality, though not ostentatiously proclaimed, are yet 
quietly inculcated. There are prayers, daily, in the 
Chapel and readings from the Bible, to which, when the 
occasion calls, there are added lectures on Ethics in its re- 
lation to conduct. Attendance upon divine service on the 
Sabbath is, in the code of the Academy, declared impera- 
tive, and the due observance of the day is strenuously in- 



,r. 



7'hc So^dh Carolina Military Acadewy. 221 

cn'efnri ^^ry^l^^ \]] yicious habits hvo stenilv rebuked and 
resolutely, outlawed, while the utmost courtesy is enjoined 
upon Cadets in their dealings with others as well as in their 
intercourse v/ith each other. 

And, lastly, that \Yhich has conduced to the end she has 
reached is the fact that the Beneficiary provision of the 
School is and has been from the beginning- the crown and 
roof thereof Said President Grover Cleveland, in 1886, 
when he made a national plea for the Academy, thon under 
fire : 

''I have heard something of the object and purposes of 
the Academy, and it seems to me that its value to the 
State and the good it is capable of accomplishing, cannot 
be over-esti m ated . 

I especially am pleased with that feature of its operation 
which permits a number of students to enjoy, free of cost, 
its advantages, upon condition that they engage afterwards 
in teaching. I have of late years been more than ever 
certain, upon the theory that education does not rise above 
its source, that the instruction of teachers properly regu- 
lated, is a most important object of puA")lic caro/' 

It, is, in truth, a noble foundation. It needs no enco- 
mium. Enough to affirmi that when South Carolina thus 
provided for higher education for her indigent and ambi- 
tious and meritorious youth, unblessed of fortune, she took 
a step that put her in the fore-front of her sister States. 
Long may she hold it. And long may the'South Carolina 
Military Academy be not onl}^ a School of Arts and Arms, 
but a never failing nursery of love for the State of her en- 
dowment. 

By the appointment of the Association of Graduates, I 
have told her story — pre-Academic and Academic. 

Gn this the semi-Centennial of her organization, with 
good will and higli consideration for all her sister Institu- 
tions of the State, the South Carolina Military Academy 
claims her right to an unchallenged future in her own 
orbit; as, relying upon her record, she points with one 



^...:i 



222 Ajipendix to Year Booh. 

hand to tiie treasures of her Training, and with tlie otlior to 
her iintarnislied Ef;cui,cheon : 
Well may she ask : 

What better right of tree to live than for thofridi it bears? 
Wh'at nobler right of School to be that for the men it rears-? 

Comrades of the Association of Graduates and Ex-Cadeis ; 
At this Semi-Centennial it gives me special pleasure to 
greet you one and all as sons of our common Alma Mater — to 
welcome to this reunion of the *' Old Citadel " every former 
wearer of the grey, who holds allegiance to the flag. 

In the name of our Alma Mater, come one and all of her 
loyal house and take your place in our principality of asso- 
ciated Arts and Arms. 

As i come, comrades, to close the duty assigned to me to- 
day, two thoughts, become paramount in my mind— one is 
memory of the past, the other action in the future— tribute 
to our noble dead, and battle, if need be, for our Alma Mater, 
but always work. 

To me, both graduate and former teacher in the School, 
with alumnal memories interlocked vdth Academic associa- 
tions of long years' growth, what a dream of young ambi- 
tion masters me to-day. ■ How man}^ brilliant, high-toned 
boys — how many young and strong, who by life's wayside 
perished or fell in battle, rise up before me in the marshalled 
ranks of memory — not a few upon w^hose brows these hands 
liave placed the wreath of praise and laid the ennobling 
spell of duty ! 

"Blow, trumpets, all your exultations blow ! 

For never shall their aureoled presence lack ; 

I see them muster in a gleaming rov/ 

With ever youthful brows that nobler show. 

Tliey come transfigured back. 

Becure from, change, in their liigh-hearted ways, 

Beautiful evermore, and with the rays 

Of morn on their white shields of Expectation." 

Thus, my comrn/les, to me and you the day is one of min- 
gled pride and sorrow- If, perforce, the memory of the 



[>., > ■ :/}ji <. ' O 



'ir..yr 



The South Carolhia Miliiary Academy. 223 

to C'Ua^ten prep.ont joys ; if mournful marble 
rises up beside the living form ; if the eloquence of silent 
dust outweighs the vanity of noisy oratory — then, not ex- 
ultant, but thoughtful, not vain but grateful, let us instruct 
our sorrovv's to be proud ; 

'Tor grief is proud, and makes his o^.Tivor stout.'' 

But let us. as in duty bound, remember what we owe to 
the liviHg and turn our thoughts to the future. That it holds 
some menace for our Alma Mater, this must be conceded. 

Whatever issue may be in store — if any — we shall meet. 
Let us, hovv'ever, trust that the completion of the half-cen- 
tury of the life of the School, that has so nobly met all the 
demands made upon it of sv/eat in Peace, and sacrifices in 
V/ar, vviil prove but the beginning of a new lease of freely-ac- 
corded power, and that the Commonwealth of South Caro- 
lina, in recognition of the Academy's long years of useful- 
ness, will enlarge its functions, and endow it with an equip- 
ment in keeping witlithe proofs it has given of its ability 
to compass the best educational ends. 

Whatever revolutions may from time to time obtain in 
the politics of the State — should shifting power hereafter 
come to pass from party to | arty or from faction to faction, 
let tlie established Schools of the State, in any event, be kept 
beyond the touch of the wheels of party change. 

We are told that in her bloodiest and angriest civil strifes, 
all factions in England have revered her institutions of 
learning, holding them harmless vrhen even her stately and 
venerable Cathedrals have not been spared. We are told 
that her oldest endowed Schools have passed unhurt through 
dynasties of Plantagenet, Lancaster, York, Tudor, Stuart 
and Hanover. May it be here in South Carolina^ as in Old 
England, that in the wildest tempests of popular excitement, 
the contending factions, 

"Lift not their spears against the Muses bower." 

Let Clemson, enhancing the memories of Fort Hill, illu- 
mine the slopes of the Piedmont and its sheltered vales. 



224 Appendix to Year Book. 

Put let the o^der li:iDii]:iarjes of the State at the Capital and 
in tlic City b}- the Sea suffer no eclipse. 

Let tlie lifj^ht from Blue Ridge mingle with the kindred 
light from Congaree and Seashore, and thus flood the Com- 
monwealth with the impartial radiance of letters, so that 
soldier's fame and scholar's glory shall make South Caro- 
lina the peer of any modern communit}- in the arms that 
protect and the arts tliat ennoble Statehood. 

And, in attestation of her wisdom and her chivalry, to 
complete her educational system, let South Carolina crovrn 
the present structure v/ith the College for the Higher Edu- 
cation of Woman — of woman, God's best creation — whose 
influence, akin to that of higliest Poetry, ''hallows every 
place in which it moves, breathes round Nature an odor 
more exquisite than tlie perfume of the rose, and sheds over 
it a- tint more magical than the blush of morning." 



A HAPPY INCIDENT. 

One of the most pleasant incidents of the day was the 
presentation of the ''History of the South Caroliria idilitary 
Academy," written and presented by Col. J. P. Thomas, to 
Gen. Hagood^ as President of the Association of Graduates. 
Col. Coward, the superintendent of the Academy, had been 
selected to deliver the work,. and said in doing so : 

"He whose vrords we have just now heard, and whose 
loyal affection and love for the Academy, no one can doubt, 
and every one must admit, has fully done his duty in that 
oration, which Dr. Capers has so forcibly and gracefully 
read. But this vrork that I hold is more than a duty. It 
is a noble tribute to our Alma Mater. In this volume, which 
I am charged to place in your hands, he has rescued from 
oblivion all that is noble, all that is valuable, ail that is 
memorable in the history of the Citadel. Plow much his 
heart was given to this labor of love is clearly shown in the 
tender pathos of the dedication. C'?^^^^ it."— "Read it.") 



dijui 



The South Carolina MiHtar>j Academy. 225 

"To the memory at 

MY WJFl'^., 

who for tlurty-five years shared the responsibilities of life, 
with its academic lights aud shadows, 
/ . and to whom 

the reading of this volume would have recalled the days when 

she was the inspiration of 

its author, 

these pages are aOectionately dedicated." 

Our only wish is that he could liave been hero to make 
the presentation in person. There is no graduate who will 
not feel that this is a prize to keep with honorable pride. 
Allow me to present to you, the representative of the Asso- 
ciation of Graduates, this work as a gift from its distin- 
guished author, Colonel Jno. P. Thomas. 

In receiving the gift, Gen. Kagood said : 

*'0n behalf of the Association of Graduates, I accept, sir, 
r with pride and pleasure, the history of the Academy, which 

you present. Convey to its distinguished author our thanks 
r and appreciation. Convey to him, too, our regrets at his 

i- absence, and our vsympathy for the painful occasion of it and 

[: our earnest hope for his future welfare." 

! THE ALUMNI GATJTKRING. 

\ 

I: At 6 o'clock in the afternoon, a very pleasant gathering 

J of the Citadel graduates took place at the Citadel. There 

I - was no formal meeting. 

THE BANQUET. 

The banquet was an auspicious finale to the gala festivi- 
ties with whicli the jul.)ilee of the Citadel Academy has been 
celebrated. Under the flasliing ligiits of the scintillant 
chandeliers and over sparkling A'euve Cliquot the loyal 
sons of tiie old institution renewed again the buoyant life 
of their college days, and pledged again tlieir faith to the 
grand old AlnKv Mater in wliose honor tliey had assembled. 

The large banqueting hall of the Charlesion Hotel was 



:j yy 



22G A2)pcndix in Year Bool'. 

thled with a brilliant asscml.tlage of guests. .A catalogue of 
their naioe's would include sco)'es of men conspicuous for a 
quarter of a century in Soiitb Carolina history, as well as 
man}' more of the most brilliant of the younger generations 
of the State's sons— all of them sons, too, of the Citadel, and 
eacli animated with loyalty to the past record of the college, 
and enthusiasm for the brilliant future which confronts it 
i ' " at the dawn of the second half of its century of life. 

I The hall was arranged with all of the taste and brilliancy 

\ which characterize the banquets of the Charleston Hotel. 

Y Three long tables led from a fourth, at which Gen. Johnson 

I ITagood presiued. The foot of the tables were occupied by 

[ Col. Asbury Coward, Col. C.S. Gadsden and Gen. C Irvine 

[ Walker, respectively. 

I Among the guests of the evening were the Mavor and 

I , Aldermen of the city, and the oflicers of the AVashington 

I . Light Infantry — an organization v\diLOse relations with the 

5 Citadel have always been of the warmest nature. The com- 

1 pany had been given a prominent position in the day's. 

;• proceedings, and were represented in tlie banqueting hall 

1. by Maj. Alex. W. ^larshall, Capt, J. E. Cogswell, Capt. W. 

i - M. Muckenfuss and Adjt. A. L. Bristol. The assemblage 

I ' was not only a brilliant one, but one typical and represen- 
\ tative of Carolina. 

f ' , THE DAY "WE CELEBEATE. 

j The speeches were appropriate, eloquent and full of en- 

\ ■ thusiasm for the Citadel — its past, present and future. When 

the coffee had been brought and fragrant cigars lighted, 
Col, C. S. Gadsden arose and .said, that he had the honor to 
announce the first regular toast of the evening, which w^as 
as they all had reason to know : 

''Thj: Day we Celebrate— 

Distinguished as the birthday of the most illustrious man 
knov;n in modern history ; it fitly mai-ks in the current year 
the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of our Alma Mater, 
wdrose invaluable influence in developing and conserving 



■i U-r}- 



famous." 



Tlic South Carolina Miliiary Academy. 227 

iilr;rc:t3 of our State has already rendered lier 



It was not, he said, inappropriate that this toast had 
been assigned to the Chairman of the Board of Visitors of 
the Citadel Academy and President of the Association of 
Graduates. 

Gen. Johnson Hagood spoke as follows in response : 

The sentiment you have announced, Mr. Chairman, 
couples the name of Washington with the South Carolina 
Military Academy. It was an accident that inaugurated 
the Academy upon a recurrence of the birthday of \Vashing- 
ton, but while an accident, it Vv^as a happy coincidence. It 
was he \\ho first brought to the attention of our infant Gov- 
ernment the importance of providing for scientific military 
education. And two days before he died, in a letter to 
Alexander Haniilton upon the subject of the organization 
of West Point, he said : "It has ever been considered by me 
an object of primary importance^ and I have omitted no 
proper opportunity of recommending it in my public 
speeches and otherwise to the attention of live Legislature." 

Washington knew—and no one in his own observation 
had better reasoii to knov\^ — that the sub-stratum upon 
which military success depends is "the thews and sinews of 
brave men." But he also knew that Vv'ar is an art ; it is a 
science. It requires and uses all the machinery which the 
most advanced civilization provides, and the teachings of 
technical schools are essential in any adequate preparation 
for martial conflict. The lessons of such schools must be 
learned Vv'ithin their walls. If left to be acquired in the 
field, all history tells us it is most frequently done amid 
disaster and defeat. No wise Government, no patriotic 
statesman, can aiTord to neglect such schools. The poet 
may dream of a time 

"When the war drum tlirobs no longer 
And the battle flaj^s are furled ;" 



22S Apjyendix to Year Book. 

hv.\ y^''^^'',? ?i^^n nrc wba^ ^^'^0' ^-''^ > v^iiilc injuries can be in- 
ii.ic'led or insults offered ; while riglits are wortli njaintai]!- 
ing, freedoTii keeping, or life living, war will be. And in 
its fiery furnace victor and vanquished, alike purged of the 
- ' dangerous humors bred m long-continued peace, wdll renew 

their manhood. If a people show themselves ftnable to 
stand the ordeal, it must yield to the great law of animate 
and inanimate nature — the survival of the fittest. This is 
not sentiment — it is fact ; it is the providence of God. It 
has been so from the beginning; it will be so to the end. 

While such is the necessity of militar^^ training to 
nations, and such the effect upon them of v/ar — the inevita- 
ble, the result of this training and the exercise of its teach- 
ings are no less marked upon the individual. Battle is the 
culmination and paroxysm of v;ar, and skill as well a& 
courage decides the issue ; but battle is not all, and in point 
of time is but a small part of soldier life. Denial of self, 
r devotion to duty, tenacity of purpose, patriotism must be 

: -there to sustain the toilsome march, the noisome trench, or 

t. . the hospital, with its long array of cots on which are 

1 stretched pallid forms, and the air perhaps tainted with 

{ pestilence. It is these high qualities, gilded by the valor 

F * which shows itself amid "battle's magnificently stern 

i arra.y," that make the soldier character the admiration of 

^ men and the love of women. It is the seed of these same 

i., . 

I high qualities, Mr. Chairman, that our Alma Meiter sows. 

\ Some may fall where there is not much earth ; some may 

^ fall among thorns; but her history shows that others bring 

I forth fruit, some am hundred fold, some sixty fold, some 

\ thirty fold. 

\ Fifty years of the life of the Military Academy are passed. 

t- But few Vv'ho were present at her birth or have guided her 

[ earlier fortunes, survive. They point to her record, and 

lovingly commit her destinies to those who come after 
them — to men in whom devotion to the honor and welfare 
of South Carolina is an inheritance of their blood. 



The Soidh Carolina Military Academy. 229 

General T. A. Hiiguenin introduced the next regular 

toasc : 

t The State of South CAEOLrN-f — 

j. Wise mother of great institutions ! Eealizing at an early 

I day in her history that '''all upward impulses come first from 

\ above/' and that the education of the many is always de- 

I pendent upon the higher education of the few, she has with 

steadfast wisdom and liberal hand nurtured her higher in- 
stitutions of learning. May their light ever shine more 
and more unto the full enlightenment of all her people. 

In the unavoidable absence of Governor B. R. Tillman, 
this toast was eloquently responded to by the gallant Adju- 
tant General, II. L. Farley, who is ahways ready to answer 
for the good name and worthy deeds of grand old South 
Carolina. 

Genl. C. Irvine Walker eloquently introduced the third 
regular toast : 

The United States oe Amekica — . 

Glorious Union, in v/hose strength and greatness each con- 
stituent State grows great and strong. 

Which v/as most happily answered by Capt. F. V. Abbott, 

of the Engineer Corps of the U. S. Army, who as Genl. 

Walker said, has devoted the best efforts of his life to the 

" important task of throwing open Charleston's portals to the 

commerce of the world. 

Col. Asbury Coward, Superintendent South Carolina 
Military Academy, introduced the next regular toast : 

The City of Charleston — 

Intrusted by the State with the home guardianship of the 
Military Academy, she has constantly surrounded her ward 
with the ailluence of her refinement, her hospitality and her 

tcndeicst solicitude: Every graduate of the Academy bears 



230 Appendix to Year Book 

with him tbrongh life the impress and grateful memories 
of tl^eso ennobling influences. 

^ Mayor Ficken's response was in the nature of a tribute to 

f the Citadel, and provoked genuine enthusiasm among the 

Alumni, He said : 

'r, 

t In responding to the toast which has just been read, we 

i. . shall not attempt to do more than acknowledge the compli- 

V ment paid to the City of Charleston in giving her a kindly 

I" remembrance on this historic occasion. In the name of Ijer 

I people permit us to say that this action is fully appreciated 

I and valued. There is indeed a fitting bond between this 

; city and the noble institution which you so proudly and 3^et 

■ so lovin.gly claim as your Alma Alater That bond becomes 

I only the stronger with the lapye of time. Your successes 

are ours, and in your trials and disappointments we too 

must ever participate. 

It is our pleasant dut}' to bring to you on this joyous 

anniversary the heartfelt greetings of the City of Charleston. 
f- . Anions the numerous congratulations received by the South 

i; . Carolina Military Acad-emy on this auspicious day, none 

l can be more earnest and more profound than those which 

{ come from the Metropolis of the State. Closely allied as 

f this city has ever been with the Academy, it can never fail 

r to manifest the deepest interest in the welfare and con- 

i tinned success of an institution, whose useful and honorable 

1' • ■ ' 

' career is the proud boast of the whole State. The history 
of the Academy is intimatel}^ blended and interwoven v;ith 

^ that of Charleston. . What affects the interest and aspira- 

; tions of ihe one must, to a greater or less degree, affect the 

I' other. 

[ The mission of the South Carolina ^lilitary Academy, al- 

l ■ though somewhat unique and peculiar to itself, is a high 

[: and a glorious one. To train the mind and develop the 

I body, to instil a lofty appreciation of honor and of duty, to 

I cultivate the highest instincts of patriotism, to teach self- 

i control and the subordination of the individual to the dis- 



M / . ' I ,. I .i'. 



/i:iJJ^ 



The South Carolwa Military Academy. 231 

cipline of recognized law, are the promiiiciit features of tlje 
cnn-iciilum of the institution. What a holy charge is this ! 
What a responsibility to bear ! Eight nobly Ijas it been ujcl ! 
In every walk of Jife and in all parts of the State do v/e find 
the evidence of a faitliful management of the high trust. 
The sons of the Academy have borne their part in life's 
work with honor to themselves and with credi-t to their 
Alma Mater. In war and in peace, in adversity and in pros- 
perity, they have acquitted themselves well. 

You have reached your Senji-Centennial day, and you 
have closely scanned and studied your glorious record of a 
half century. You have gleaned lessons of wisdom through 
the experience of the past. Our prayer is that they Avill 
prove lessons of profit. i\Iay the Academy enlarge and ex- 
tend its career. !vlay it grow in influence and usefulness. 
May it continue to stretch out its sheltering arms over the 
youth of our State, and teach thern the noble and elevating 
doctrines which characterize the institution. The City of 
Charleston wishes continued prosperity and a more ex- 
tended influence and power to the South Carolina Military 
Academy. 

Mr. J. H. Swift, the oldest Graduate present, introduced 
the Fifth Eegular Toast. . " 

The Associatthx of Gkaduatkb— ■ 

The representative type of State citizenship. * The past 
guarantees the future. 

Y/hich was responded to by the Rev. Thos. II. Law, D. D. 

The next Regular Toast was announced by the Chairman. 
Gen. Johnson Hogood, and received in silence, the entire 
audience rising. 

The Dead of the Roll of Gkaduates— 

Some have fallen in the jiaths of Peace; many upon the 
fields of Battle; but wherever Death claimed them they 
were found illustrating the teachings of Alma Mater by loyal 
devotion to State and to Duty. 



'l' • . -■ {;i : i" . . ',]> ;^J ;/. 



232 AppcucUx to Year Book. 

The Seventh Eegular Toast was proposed by Major J. B. 

White, wlio is ail Ex-Superinteiidont of the Citadel, and 
Tvas jnuch beloved by the boys ho cominanded, and elo- 
quently responded to by Hon. Robt. Aldrich. 

The ]>[umerous Body of Ex-Cadets — 

Although for various eauses they were untimely, weaned, 
yet they imbibed enough of the spirit of Alma Mater to im- 
pel them all to lives of usefulness, and many to the attain- 
ment of disti notion. 

Capt. Jas. G. Holmes proposed the eighth regular toast. 

Our Friends, the W. L. I. . . 

Th?*ougliout Dig half eentury now closing, closely identi- 
fied with the Baii;aiion of Citadel Cadets. In peace and 
war devoted friends, trusted allies. Only gracious memo- 
ries are recalled for all the years that are passed ; only joy- 
ous hopes spring up for the future which opens up to-day, 
in the bonds of arenevved and continuing friendship. Esto 
perpeiiLO. 

Which was most ably answered by the Hon- W. A. Conrte- 
nay. 

Dr. F. L. Parker introduced in glowing words the ninth 
regular toast. - , 

The Lady Friends of the Cadjlts,— 

"Lo what geutillesse these women have, •> ' 

If we could know it for our rudenesse ; . 

How busy they be us to keepe and save . • ■ 

Both in hole and also in silkenesse ! " ■"•'■ ''■' ' 

And always right sorrie for our distresse 

In every manner ; thus shew thy routhe, 

That in hem is al goodnesse and trouthe."—( CAauc^r.) 

Capt. John G. Capers, a prominent young lawyer and the 
editor of the C'olurabia Journal, responded to this toast to 
"The Tadv Friends of the Cadets." 



Pif«y> ;. «yyy w i >w;.y ' V>y « iig| l>^ 



The South Oarolina Military Academy. 233 • 

After this toast Col. Gadsden, Cliairiiian of the Conimit- 
toe, .said that no man had contributed more to the success 
of the day than CoL J. P. Thomas, to whom he had sent the 
following telegram : 

Charleston S. C, February 22, 1893. 

To CoL J. P. Thomas, Columbia, S. C: The Association 
of Graduates extends to you its hearty thanks on this semi- 
centennial festival for your valuable contribution of the 
address and history of the South Carolina Military Academy, 
and deeply sympathizes with you in your untimely acci- 
dent. C. S. Gadsden, for the Association. 

The following response from Col. Thomas was read by 
Mr. G. C. Wells \ 

" Extend to the Association of Graduates my appreci- 
ation of the thanks and sympathy tendered me. God bless 
our Alma Mater and all her sons. . 

The telegram was heartily applauded and a toast was 
given for the speedy recovery of Col. Thomas. 

The tenth regular toast w^as ably offered by Col. J. J. 
Lucas. _ • \ ; ;. ,-^ 

Ma J, St. James Cummings: ■' ,•.....'..„-', 

Who has woven so gracefully the garland of Poesy 
around the ever memorable incidents of this golden day in 
the history of the Academy. 

Major St. James Cummings, the last regular speaker, in 
response to a toast to himself, said that he felt like a child, 
and even the youngest child, of the family into which he 
had been brought. Devotion of brain, devotion of soul, 
devotion of resources, on the part of the sons of the Cita- 
del, said he, were my material for the work I have done for 
you to-day. It is a privilege to come in ev-en at the eleventh 
hour to share in such a noble undertaking. If the oppor- 
tunities of the coming years are seized with the same devo- 
id 



234 Appendix to Year Jhok. 

tiou ;i.s of old, the future} history of the Citadc] is cortaiu to 
be oven more olorious than its })ast. I feel proud that you 
liave made me your lyric liistorian ; and your praise for iny 
efforts is indeed precious and sweet. You luivc opened to 
me tlie secrets of your council chamber, and led me to 
your festal board, and I have forgotten that I \yas ever a 
strariger. Henceforth wo are brothers in hope- '' I^ong live 
the Citadel/'' 



ACADEMIC BOARD, 



- Col. ASBIJRY COWAED, Sujjeriiitendent, and' Frofessor 

\ of Moral and Political Science. 

i *3xD Lieut. J. A. TOWEES, 1st Artillery, U. S. A., Com- 

\ mamlant of Cadets and Professor of Miliia/nj Science and 

\ 'Tactics, " ' " 

Maj. St. JA]^IES CUMMIXGS, Professor of Pnglish Lit- 
i erature and History. 

\ ': Islu. C. L. EEESE, Prrjfessor of Chemistry and Physics. 

I • Maj. E. G. THOMAS, Prcfes^or of MathermUics and En~ 

gineeriny, 

Capt. E. E. :N[AZYCK, Assistant Prrfessor, in Charge of 
Mfjdern Lancjuages. 

2x1) Lieut. O. J. EOiSD, Assistant Prcfef^sor of Mialie^ 
rnaiics^ and in Charge of Draioing and. Booh-Keejnng. 

. 2]SD Lieut. J. T. COLEMATs", Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry and Physics. 

2xD Lieut. C. E. ^OYDsEOls^ Assistant Professor of Eng-. 
lisht Literature and History. 

F. L. EAEKEE, M. D., Surgeon. 

1st. Lieut. W. ^. WHITE, Quarterynaster. 

* Died March, 1893. Succeeded by detail of 2d Lieut. JNO. M. 
JENKINS, 6th Cav. U. S. A. 



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